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Does Parkinson’s Start In One Hand



When People Talk About Parkinsons They May Mention The Effects It Has On The Substantia Nigra But Did You Know That There Are Other Areas Of The Brain That Are Affected By The Condition

Jun 4, 2018

Parkinson’s is a condition that causes the gradual loss of the dopamine-producing brain cells of the substantia nigra — an area of the brain located just above where the spinal cord meets the midbrain. It is these cells that produce and release the neurotransmitter dopamine, which has a key role in turning thought about movement into action.

While this definition of the condition is useful to briefly explain Parkinson’s, the whole story is somewhat more complex. Over the last 30 years, it has become accepted that Parkinson’s also causes a number of non-motor symptoms, such as changes in sleep, smell and even the way we think, which likely involve other areas of the brain.

Now scientists are looking at the broader effects of the condition on the brain in an attempt to better understand why people experience different symptoms. The finding could lead us to new treatments that tackle more than just the motor symptoms of the condition.

The Influence Of Parkinsons Disease Motor Symptom Asymmetry On Hand Performance: An Examination Of The Grooved Pegboard Task Sara M. Scharoun

1Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, Canada

2Department of Kinesiology & Physical Education, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON, Canada

3Rehabilitation Sciences Institute, University of Toronto, 500 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada

4Sun Life Financial Movement Disorders Research and Rehabilitation Centre , Wilfrid Laurier University, 66 Hickory Street, Waterloo, ON, Canada

Academic Editor:

Abstract

1. Introduction

Parkinson’s disease is defined by asymmetric motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, and bradykinesia . This right-left asymmetry has been an influential factor when differentiating PD from other, similar movement disorders . The reason for this symptom asymmetry is unknown; however, it may be influenced by handedness . The functional implications of handedness and motor symptom asymmetry are not well understood. However, Munhoz and colleagues recently reported that early onset, left-handedness, and left-sided onset are related to long ambulatory disease survival, therefore highlighting the importance of understanding the link between handedness and PD motor symptom asymmetry.

2. Methods

2.1. Participants

This study included 170 right-handed participants with PD and 103 right-handed healthy older adults . The institution research ethics board approved the study and all participants signed informed consent before enrolling in the study.

2.2. Procedures

  

Tremors In Parkinsons Disease: What They Are Types Of Tremors And More

Getting the trembling associated with Parkinson’s under control can be a challenge, but treatments can help.

Don RaufJustin Laube, MDNicole Rerk/Shutterstock

Tremors are a defining characteristic of Parkinson’s disease, affecting about 8 out of 10 people with this movement disorder. Many people think the involuntary shaking motion is the main problem for patients. While it is certainly an irritating symptom that individuals want to get under control, other characteristics of the disease can be more debilitating.

What Is The Prognosis And Life Expectancy For Parkinson’s Disease

    The severity of Parkinson’s disease symptoms and signs vary greatly from person to peson, and it is not possible to predict how quickly the disease will progress. Parkinson’s disease itself is not a fatal disease, and the average life expectancy is similar to that of people without the disease. Secondary complications, such as pneumonia, falling-related injuries, and choking can lead to death. Many treatment options can reduce some of the symptoms and prolong the quality of life.

    What Lifestyle Changes Can I Make To Ease Parkinsons Symptoms

    Tremor Disorder or Parkinson

    Exercise: Exercise helps improve muscle strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, and tremor. It is also strongly believed to improve memory, thinking and reduce the risk of falls and decrease anxiety and depression. One study in persons with Parkinson’s disease showed that 2.5 hours of exercise per week resulted in improved ability to move and a slower decline in quality of life compared to those who didn’t exercise or didn’t start until later in the course of their disease. Some exercises to consider include strengthening or resistance training, stretching exercises or aerobics . All types of exercise are helpful.

    Eat a healthy, balanced diet: This is not only good for your general health but can ease some of the non-movement related symptoms of Parkinson’s, such as constipation. Eating foods high in fiber in particular can relieve constipation. The Mediterranean diet is one example of a healthy diet.

    Preventing falls and maintaining balance: Falls are a frequent complication of Parkinson’s. While you can do many things to reduce your risk of falling, the two most important are: 1) to work with your doctor to ensure that your treatments — whether medicines or deep brain stimulation — are optimal; and 2) to consult with a physical therapist who can assess your walking and balance. The physical therapist is the expert when it comes to recommending assistive devices or exercise to improve safety and preventing falls.

    Improve the quality of your sleep.

    What Is A Tremor And What Makes It Different With Parkinsons

    Tremor is an uncontrollable, rhythmic muscle contraction that triggers quivering in one or more parts of the body. It often occurs in hands, arms, or legs but can also affect the head, neck, or torso. This shaking may appear in sporadic spells or continue constantly.

    The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke says that age is a risk factor — middle-aged and older adults are more likely to experience tremors.

    Parkinsons Disease Effects On The Body Tremor Motor Symptoms Emma-Marie Smith

    The Parkinson’s tremor affects 80% of people with Parkinson’s disease. Sadly, it is also one of the more difficult symptoms to treat. The PD tremor is characterized by a quivering movement or shakes that occurs at rest, but it presents differently in everyone. People in the early stages of PD usually experience tremors starting in one hand, leg or foot, but the tremor may eventually progress to both sides of the body. Find out the effects of Parkinson’s tremor on the body and explore ways to treat motor symptoms of the disease.

    What Are The Primary Motor Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

    There are four primary motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease: tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability . Observing two or more of these symptoms is the main way that physicians diagnose Parkinson’s.

    It is important to know that not all of these symptoms must be present for a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease to be considered. In fact, younger people may only notice one or two of these motor symptoms, especially in the early stages of the disease. Not everyone with Parkinson’s disease has a tremor, nor is a tremor proof of Parkinson’s. If you suspect Parkinson’s, see a neurologist or movement disorders specialist.

    Tremors

    Read more about Parkinson’s tremors

    Rigidity

    Bradykinesia

    mask-like expression of the face

    Postural Instability

    Walking or Gait Difficulties

    episodes of freezing

    Dystonia

    Dystonia

    Vocal Symptoms

    What Are The Surgical Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

    Things you should never do (or say) to someone with ...

    Most patients with Parkinson’s disease can maintain a good quality of life with medications. However, as the disease worsens, medications may no longer be effective in some patients. In these patients, the effectiveness of medications becomes unpredictable – reducing symptoms during “on” periods and no longer controlling symptoms during “off” periods, which usually occur when the medication is wearing off and just before the next dose is to be taken. Sometimes these variations can be managed with changes in medications. However, sometimes they can’t. Based on the type and severity of your symptoms, the failure of adjustments in your medications, the decline in your quality of life and your overall health, your doctor may discuss some of the available surgical options.

    What Is The Outlook For Persons With Parkinsons Disease

    Although there is no cure or absolute evidence of ways to prevent Parkinson’s disease, scientists are working hard to learn more about the disease and find innovative ways to better manage it, prevent it from progressing and ultimately curing it.

    Currently, you and your healthcare team’s efforts are focused on medical management of your symptoms along with general health and lifestyle improvement recommendations . By identifying individual symptoms and adjusting the course of action based on changes in symptoms, most people with Parkinson’s disease can live fulfilling lives.

    The future is hopeful. Some of the research underway includes:

    • Using stem cells to produce new neurons, which would produce dopamine.
    • Producing a dopamine-producing enzyme that is delivered to a gene in the brain that controls movement.
    • Using a naturally occurring human protein – glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, GDNF – to protect dopamine-releasing nerve cells.

    Many other investigations are underway too. Much has been learned, much progress has been made and additional discoveries are likely to come.

    Treatment For The Motor Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

    There are many ways to deal with Parkinson’s disease motor symptoms, including medications, occupational therapy and lifestyle adjustments. You may find that tremors make you more susceptible to accidents – such as tripping, falling or spilling hot liquids – so you must take care and ask for the help and support you need.

    In Parkinson’s disease, freezing of gait is characterized by hesitation before stepping forward, or a feeling like your feet have frozen to the floor. Frozen gait usually only lasts for a step or two, but you will need to be careful when crossing busy streets and try to minimize your risk of falling wherever possible.

    You can talk to your doctor about medications to try, as well your surgical and homeopathic options. However, there is no cure for Parkinson’s disease and no way to stop the symptoms entirely, but scientists are working to change that.

    article references

    APA ReferenceSmith, E. . Parkinson’s Disease Effects on the Body? Tremor, Motor Symptoms, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2021, August 11 from https://www.healthyplace.com/parkinsons-disease/symptoms/parkinsons-disease-effects-on-the-body-tremor-motor-symptoms

    What Medications Are Used To Treat Parkinsons Disease

    Medications are the main treatment method for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Your doctor will work closely with you to develop a treatment plan best suited for you based on the severity of your disease at the time of diagnosis, side effects of the drug class and success or failure of symptom control of the medications you try.

    Medications combat Parkinson’s disease by:

    • Helping nerve cells in the brain make dopamine.
    • Mimicking the effects of dopamine in the brain.
    • Blocking an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain.
    • Reducing some specific symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

    Levodopa: Levodopa is a main treatment for the slowness of movement, tremor, and stiffness symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Nerve cells use levodopa to make dopamine, which replenishes the low amount found in the brain of persons with Parkinson’s disease. Levodopa is usually taken with carbidopa to allow more levodopa to reach the brain and to prevent or reduce the nausea and vomiting, low blood pressure and other side effects of levodopa. Sinemet® is available in an immediate release formula and a long-acting, controlled release formula. Rytary® is a newer version of levodopa/carbidopa that is a longer-acting capsule. The newest addition is Inbrija®, which is inhaled levodopa. It is used by people already taking regular carbidopa/levodopa for when they have off episodes .

    What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

    Parkinson’s disease: Symptoms include tingling and ...

    Each person with Parkinson’s disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms; others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

    In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

    Early stage

    Early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

    Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

    Mid stage

    Mid-late stage

    Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

    Advanced stage

    Treatment Depends On Properly Identifying The Type

    If pain is bilateral always assume it is central pain; pain due to PD. In my experience Azilect works great for this type of pain. Other medications which can be employed for this pain as well.

    Massage therapy works for all types of leg pain-my favorite therapy but can be costly. Water therapy may also work for all types except central pain. Physical therapy can alleviate dystonia pain, as well as musculoskeletal and radicular pain.

    If pain is due to dystonia related to levodopa intake, find out when it occurs—end of dose or at peak dose. Typically adjusting medication doses will resolve problem. However, if dystonia is an initial symptom of PD, initiating treatment with levodopa will resolve. If medication adjustment does not work well for levodopa induced dystonia, another treatment option is DBS . Pain due to dystonia independent of cause can also respond well to Botox injections, as well as centrally acting muscle relaxants. To avoid and alleviate pain caused by stiff muscles, a great treatment option is activity in the form of stretching exercises—any number of activities will do such as tai-chi or yoga. For me when I start having radicular pain shooting down my leg it is time to up my levodopa dosage.

    If you are having leg pain make sure to discuss it with your physician.

    How To Recognize The Signs Of Parkinson’s Disease

    This article was medically reviewed by Janice Litza, MD. Dr. Litza is a board certified Family Medicine Physician in Wisconsin. She is a practicing Physician and taught as a Clinical Professor for 13 years, after receiving her MD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health in 1998.There are 17 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed 138,619 times.

    Experts say that symptoms of Parkinson’s disease usually start slowly with a tremor in one hand, along with stiffness and slowing movement. Over time, you may develop more symptoms on both sides of your body.XTrustworthy SourceMayo ClinicEducational website from one of the world’s leading hospitalsGo to source Parkinson’s disease is a condition where your brain’s nerve cells don’t produce enough dopamine, which effects your motor skills. Research suggests that Parkinson’s disease can be difficult to diagnose because there’s no test for it, so your doctor will likely review your medical records and do a neurological exam.XTrustworthy SourceMedlinePlusCollection of medical information sourced from the US National Library of MedicineGo to source Getting an early diagnosis can help you get the best treatment to help manage your symptoms, so talk to your doctor if you think you might have symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

    What Are The Complications Of Parkinson Disease

    Parkinson disease causes physical symptoms at first. Problems with cognitive function, including forgetfulness and trouble with concentration, may arise later. As the disease gets worse with time, many people develop dementia. This can cause profound memory loss and makes it hard to maintain relationships.

    Parkinson disease dementia can cause problems with:

    • Speaking and communicating with others
    • Problem solving
    • Forgetfulness
    • Paying attention

    If you have Parkinson disease and dementia, in time, you likely won’t be able to live by yourself. Dementia affects your ability to care of yourself, even if you can still physically do daily tasks.

    Experts don’t understand how or why dementia often occurs with Parkinson disease. It’s clear, though, that dementia and problems with cognitive function are linked to changes in the brain that cause problems with movement. As with Parkinson disease, dementia occurs when nerve cells degenerate, leading to chemical changes in the brain. Parkinson disease dementia may be treated with medicines also used to treat Alzheimer’s disease, another type of dementia.

    Tips For Dealing With Parkinsons Disease Tremor

    Parkinson

    Because the Parkinson’s tremor appears at rest, many people find that exercise helps control their symptoms. Here are some tips to help you limit the effects of Parkinson’s tremor:

    • If the tremor presents in your jaw, try chewing gum to keep the area moving.
    • Foot tremors present when you are sitting or lying down, and they always disappear when you stand up. Therefore you should try to avoid long periods of inactivity, as staying still may worsen your tremor symptoms.
    • Finger twitching and the “pill roll” tremor refer to tremors in the thumb and fingers. You may find hand exercises such as rotating your hands, moving your fingers or squeezing a stress ball will help ease your symptoms. If you feel self-conscious about your tremor, you can always hide your hands in your pockets or place them under a table until the shaking subsides.

    Causes Of Resting Tremors In Parkinsons Disease

    5 mins readCharacteristics of PD TremorsTremor is one of the characteristic symptoms of Parkinson’s disease , which can lead to communication difficulties, Tremors occur when the person’s limb is resting, Tremors can also affect the jaw or tongue, this begins with the trembling or shaking of one finger, Approximately 70 percent of people experience a slight tremor in one of their hands or feet in the early stages of PD, Parkinson’s disease tremors often start in the fingers or hands with what’s called a pill-rolling motion, As with stiffness, A flutter of a tremor in my left thumb was the first symptom that caught my attention, As with stiffness, arms and head, This typically starts in one hand, Tremors can also affect the jaw or tongue,Tremors associated to Parkinson’s disease are resting tremors, One of the earliest and most widely occurring symptoms of Parkinson’s disease is resting tremors, Hands, Symptoms, Tremors can also affect the jaw or tongue, which occur when the body part is inactive, fingers, These tremors are known as a resting tremor, Occasionally, fingers, arms and head, fingers, and Treatment

    4 mins readThere are five main places you’ll have Parkinson’s tremors: 1, Usually, but it is also characteristic of essential tremor , People had discovered there were things that they had

    Tremors Not Associated With Parkinsons Disease

    There are different types of tremors, of which not all are associated with Parkinson’s disease, and they vary slightly in terms of how, when and where they manifest in the body. They include essential tremor and dystonic tremor and may be associated with other conditions and genetic mutations, although a specific gene has not been identified.

    A patient with a Parkinson’s tremor typically will find that their symptoms worsen and spread to other parts of the body over time. Generally, the tremor starts in one hand and can progress to the arm and foot on the same side of the body, and then eventually to the other side of the body. In severe cases, tremors also can affect the jaw or lips.

    How Common Is Cognitive Decline In Parkinsons

    A new study finds that cognitive impairment is a frequent and rapidly progressing symptom of Parkinson’s disease . About half of the participants who had PD for an average of five years and had normal cognition at the beginning of the study developed mild cognitive impairment within six years – about 11 years after PD diagnosis. Those few who developed MCI progressed to dementia within five more years. The results appear in the September 11 online edition of Neurology.

    With a diagnosis of PD, most people and their physicians focus on treating and coping with movement symptoms. Yet even early in the course of disease, people with PD may have difficulty multitasking, or feel that their thinking abilities are “just not the same.”

    To better understand the rate at which cognitive impairment develops, and identify risk factors for the development of cognitive impairment, researchers led by Daniel Weintraub, M.D., recruited 141 people with PD to participate in the study. All were receiving treatment at the University of Pennsylvania’s Udall Center for Parkinson’s Disease Research. On average they were 69 years old and had been living with PD for five years; 63 percent were men. All participants had normal cognition based on a battery of standard tests for people with PD. The researchers re-evaluated study participants’ cognition each year for up to six years.

    Results

    What Does It Mean?

    Reference

    What Is The Treatment For Parkinson’s Disease

    Parkinson s disease

      There is currently no treatment to cure Parkinson’s disease. Several therapies are available to delay the onset of motor symptoms and to ameliorate motor symptoms. All of these therapies are designed to increase the amount of dopamine in the brain either by replacing dopamine, mimicking dopamine, or prolonging the effect of dopamine by inhibiting its breakdown. Studies have shown that early therapy in the non-motor stage can delay the onset of motor symptoms, thereby extending quality of life.

      The most effective therapy for Parkinson’s disease is levodopa , which is converted to dopamine in the brain. However, because long-term treatment with levodopa can lead to unpleasant side effects , its use is often delayed until motor impairment is more severe. Levodopa is frequently prescribed together with carbidopa , which prevents levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. Co-treatment with carbidopa allows for a lower levodopa dose, thereby reducing side effects.

      In earlier stages of Parkinson’s disease, substances that mimic the action of dopamine , and substances that reduce the breakdown of dopamine inhibitors) can be very efficacious in relieving motor symptoms. Unpleasant side effects of these preparations are quite common, including swelling caused by fluid accumulation in body tissues, drowsiness, constipation, dizziness, hallucinations, and nausea.

      Which Body Parts Do Parkinsons Tremors Affect

      There are five main places you’ll have Parkinson’s tremors:

      1. Hands. Parkinson’s disease tremors often start in the fingers or hands with what’s called a pill-rolling motion. Imagine holding a pill between your thumb and index finger and rolling it back and forth.

      2. Foot. A Parkinson’s foot tremor is more likely to happen while you’re sitting or lying down with your feet at rest. If the tremor moves into your thigh muscles. It could look like your whole leg is shaking.

      Foot tremors disappear when you stand or walk because those are active movements. A foot or leg tremor while you’re standing may be another condition.

      3. Jaw. This is common in people with Parkinson’s. It may look like you’re shivering. It can become bothersome if the tremor makes your teeth chatter. If you wear dentures, it could make them shift or fall out.

      Chewing eases the tremor, so gum might help.

      4. Tongue. It’s rare, but a tongue tremor can cause your entire head to shake.

      5. Internal. Some people with Parkinson’s say they can feel a shaking sensation in their chest or abdomen. But can’t be seen from the outside.

      Second Type Of Leg Pain Is Caused By Dystonia

      When related to levodopa, it usually occurs as a wearing off but can also occur at peak dose. In most cases this leg pain is unilateral and has direct correlation to medication intake. When pain is due to dystonia, it is more common in early morning. This type of leg pain is usually accompanied by toes curling and foot abnormally posturing.

      What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

      Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease differ from person to person. They also change as the disease progresses. Symptoms that one person gets in the early stages of the disease, another person may not get until later—or not at all.

      Symptoms most often start between the ages of 50 and 60. They develop slowly. They often go unnoticed by family, friends, and even the person who has them.

      The disease causes motor symptoms and non-motor symptoms. Motor symptoms are those that have to do with how you move. The most common one is tremor.

      Tremor and other motor symptoms

      Tremor, or shaking, often in a hand, arm, or leg, occurs when you’re awake and sitting or standing still . It gets better when you move that body part.

      • Tremor is often the first symptom that people with Parkinson’s disease or their family members notice.
      • At first the tremor may appear in just one arm or leg or only on one side of the body. The tremor also may affect the chin, lips, and tongue.
      • As the disease progresses, the tremor may spread to both sides of the body. But in some cases the tremor stays on just one side.

      Emotional and physical stress tends to make the tremor more noticeable. Sleep, complete relaxation, and intentional movement or action usually reduce or stop the tremor.

      The most common cause of non-Parkinson’s tremor is essential tremor. It’s a treatable condition that is often wrongly diagnosed as Parkinson’s.

      Besides tremor, the most common symptoms include:

      Theory Of Pd Progression: Braaks Hypothesis

      Alternative Treatment for Parkinson

      The current theory is that the earliest signs of Parkinson’s are found in the enteric nervous system, the medulla and the olfactory bulb, which controls sense of smell. Under this theory, Parkinson’s only progresses to the substantia nigra and cortex over time.

      This theory is increasingly borne out by evidence that non-motor symptoms, such as a loss of sense of smell , sleep disorders and constipation may precede the motor features of the disease by several years. For this reason, researchers are increasingly focused on these non-motor symptoms to detect PD as early as possible and to look for ways to stop its progression.

      Page reviewed by Dr. Ryan Barmore, Movement Disorders Fellow at the University of Florida, a Parkinson’s Foundation Center of Excellence.

      *Please note that not all content is available in both languages. If you are interested in receiving Spanish communications, we recommend selecting “both” to stay best informed on the Foundation’s work and the latest in PD news.

      What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

      Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and the rate of decline vary widely from person to person. The most common symptoms include:

      Other symptoms include:

      • Decreased facial expressions: You may not smile or blink as often as the disease worsens; your face lacks expression.
      • Speech/vocal changes: Speech may be quick, become slurred or be soft in tone. You may hesitate before speaking. The pitch of your voice may become unchanged .
      • Handwriting changes: You handwriting may become smaller and more difficult to read.
      • Depression and anxiety.
      • Sleeping disturbances including disrupted sleep, acting out your dreams, and restless leg syndrome.
      • Pain, lack of interest , fatigue, change in weight, vision changes.
      • Low blood pressure.

      The Nervous System And Parkinson’s Disease

      the hands and fingers, and their use or lack thereof, have key roles either in the rate of degeneration or in progressive symptom reduction. Indeed, if you’ve ever seen one of those grotesque renderings of how the human body is actually represented by the proportion of brain power devoted to each body part , the hands come out as absolutely massive – hands and neurology are very strongly linked!

      Therefore hand exercises and finger stimulation are critically important for preventing the ravishes of neuronal atrophy in PD, and also to strengthen “para-sympathetic tone”, enhancing the ability to maintain a relaxed state, so important for people affected by the disease. Indeed, the story of Chris Lacey is intriguing, with reports he is now free from PD symptoms after intensive carving of chess pieces as a hobby.

      The importance of hands and fingers is hence profound for those of us who have been diagnosed with chronic disease.

      The Cranial Nerves And Parkinson’s Disease

      for more about this in the context of PD.

      However, I believe there is something unique about the Social Engagement system in humans, even amongst mammals: our hands. We humans also use hands for expressing our emotions in very significant ways too. Indeed, we can communicate very profoundly like this: we have even developed sign languages, so we can and do literally talk with our hands. 

      We can also hush each other with hands without making sound ourselves – meaning we can communicate that serious danger is present requiring everyone in the social group to keep quiet to avoid attracting attention, in such a way that we don’t attract attention ourselves.

      Orienting is also an important part of the Cranial Nerve function for threat/safety evaluation, including the ability to turn eyes or ears to the source of potential threat. But with our hands we can also, naturally, orient each other to potential threats which we individually may have detected, within social groups – pointing a finger in direction of danger, for example, or signalling to the group to stop in its tracks. 

      We can also make very distinct sounds and a wide range of “calls to action” directly with our hands: clapping, clicking fingers, whistling through the fingers, not to mention beating drums, etc.

      I have just communicated all this to you through my hands too, because I typed these words with my fingers!

      What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinson Disease

      Do You Have Early Warning Signs of Parkinson

      Parkinson disease symptoms usually start out mild, and then progressively get much worse. The first signs are often so subtle that many people don’t seek medical attention at first. These are common symptoms of Parkinson disease:

      • Tremors that affect the face and jaw, legs, arms, and hands
      • Slow, stiff walking

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