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What Are The Early Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease



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3. Loss of SmellMany people temporarily lose their sense of smell due to colds or the flu, but if the loss is sustained over a length of time without any noticeable congestion, then it could be an early sign of Parkinson’s disease.

4. Sleeping DisordersTrouble sleeping can be attributed to many illnesses and Parkinson’s disease is one of them. Waking due to sudden body movements, or thrashing your legs in your sleep could be a warning sign of the condition.

5. Stiffness in Walking and MovingGeneral stiffness that can’t be attributed to exercise aches and pains and doesn’t ease up when moving around could be an early warning sign of Parkinson’s disease. Many patients complain that it feels like their feet are literally stuck to the floor.

MORE: Did you know that Parkinson’s disease patients may benefit from dancing?

6. ConstipationUnable to move your bowels is also a common early sign of Parkinson’s disease. Although this is a common enough problem in healthy people, Parkinson’s patients are more susceptible to constipation. If you suddenly find you’re constipated and consider your diet normal then you should have a doctor check you out.

7. Low or Soft VoiceA sore throat or a cold can change the way you speak, but if you have been experiencing a sudden softness to the tone of your voice and are now speaking in a quieter or hoarser tone, this could be an early symptom of Parkinson’s disease.

MORE: Check some seated exercises for patients with Parkinson’s disease

How Is Constipation An Early Warning Sign Of Parkinson’s It’s Such A Common Problem

A: It’s not as specific as other prodromal symptoms, like anosmia. The rate at which people with chronic and unexplained problems with constipation develop Parkinson’s disease is not as easy to pin down. But if someone has unexplained, persistent constipation, it should at least be noted, as it could be considered prodromal.

You Could Have Parkinsons Disease Symptoms In Your 30s Or 40s And Not Know It

Blog post | 11 Apr 2019

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You’d be forgiven for thinking that Parkinson’s is only an older person’s disease.

Many people with Parkinson’s, a progressive disease of the nervous system, are indeed at retirement age. So the world was shocked when Back to The Future actor Michael J. Fox revealed he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at only 29 years old.

But Fox’s case isn’t unique. It’s believed that 1 in 10 people with Parkinson’s develop the disease some time before their 40th birthday. About 1 in 5 Australians with Parkinson’s are at ‘working age’ .

And a person can live with symptoms for many years before a diagnosis of Parkinson’s is made.

To mark World Parkinson’s Day, Thursday April 11, here’s what you need to know about the early signs of this insidious neurological disease.

Depression And Anxiety Are Also Early Warning Signs Of Parkinson’s How So

A: Like the other symptoms discussed here, late-onset depression and anxiety are nonmotor prodromal manifestations of the condition. It’s not that everyone who is depressed will get Parkinson’s, and the numbers are lower than they are for symptoms like anosmia and REM behavior disorder. But the link is important to explore, and we are doing more research on it all the time.

What Is Rem Behavior Disorder And How Is It Connected To Parkinson’s

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A: REM behavior disorder is different than other sleep problems, like insomnia. People who have it may jerk or kick — it’s as though they are acting out their dreams. In a similar pattern to anosmia, people with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder have at least a 50 percent chance of eventually developing Parkinson’s disease.

What Is The Prognosis And Life Expectancy For Parkinson’s Disease

The severity of Parkinson’s disease symptoms and signs vary greatly from person to peson, and it is not possible to predict how quickly the disease will progress. Parkinson’s disease itself is not a fatal disease, and the average life expectancy is similar to that of people without the disease. Secondary complications, such as pneumonia, falling-related injuries, and choking can lead to death. Many treatment options can reduce some of the symptoms and prolong the quality of life.

Do People Actually Lose Their Sense Of Smell With Parkinson’s

A: Yes. It’s a condition called anosmia, and if you have it with no other disease , you have at least a 50 percent chance of developing Parkinson’s disease in the next five to 10 years. What happens is that alpha-synuclein, the protein that clumps in the part of the brain that regulates dopamine and leads to Parkinson’s disease, also aggregates in the olfactory bulb, the part of the brain responsible for your sense of smell. This happens well before the protein accumulations cause motor symptoms.

What Lifestyle Changes Can I Make To Ease Parkinsons Symptoms

Exercise: Exercise helps improve muscle strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, and tremor. It is also strongly believed to improve memory, thinking and reduce the risk of falls and decrease anxiety and depression. One study in persons with Parkinson’s disease showed that 2.5 hours of exercise per week resulted in improved ability to move and a slower decline in quality of life compared to those who didn’t exercise or didn’t start until later in the course of their disease. Some exercises to consider include strengthening or resistance training, stretching exercises or aerobics . All types of exercise are helpful.

Eat a healthy, balanced diet: This is not only good for your general health but can ease some of the non-movement related symptoms of Parkinson’s, such as constipation. Eating foods high in fiber in particular can relieve constipation. The Mediterranean diet is one example of a healthy diet.

Preventing falls and maintaining balance: Falls are a frequent complication of Parkinson’s. While you can do many things to reduce your risk of falling, the two most important are: 1) to work with your doctor to ensure that your treatments — whether medicines or deep brain stimulation — are optimal; and 2) to consult with a physical therapist who can assess your walking and balance. The physical therapist is the expert when it comes to recommending assistive devices or exercise to improve safety and preventing falls.

Improve the quality of your sleep.

Parkinsons Disease Signs And Symptoms: Before The Diagnosis

Early Parkinsons — Parkinson

Mindy Bixby

Neurologist, Mindy Bixby, DO, discusses the early signs and symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease, commonly referred to as non-motor symptoms.

Dr. Bixby explains how to identify and differentiate these symptoms from other disorders and when it’s time to visit your doctor for an accurate diagnosis.

She also covers therapy and treatment options if diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease or other movement disorders.

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What Are The Primary Motor Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

There are four primary motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease: tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability . Observing two or more of these symptoms is the main way that physicians diagnose Parkinson’s.

It is important to know that not all of these symptoms must be present for a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease to be considered. In fact, younger people may only notice one or two of these motor symptoms, especially in the early stages of the disease. Not everyone with Parkinson’s disease has a tremor, nor is a tremor proof of Parkinson’s. If you suspect Parkinson’s, see a neurologist or movement disorders specialist.

Tremors

Read more about Parkinson’s tremors

Rigidity

Bradykinesia

mask-like expression of the face

Postural Instability

Walking or Gait Difficulties

episodes of freezing

Dystonia

Dystonia

Vocal Symptoms

What Are The Surgical Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

Most patients with Parkinson’s disease can maintain a good quality of life with medications. However, as the disease worsens, medications may no longer be effective in some patients. In these patients, the effectiveness of medications becomes unpredictable – reducing symptoms during “on” periods and no longer controlling symptoms during “off” periods, which usually occur when the medication is wearing off and just before the next dose is to be taken. Sometimes these variations can be managed with changes in medications. However, sometimes they can’t. Based on the type and severity of your symptoms, the failure of adjustments in your medications, the decline in your quality of life and your overall health, your doctor may discuss some of the available surgical options.

What Is The Outlook For Persons With Parkinsons Disease

Although there is no cure or absolute evidence of ways to prevent Parkinson’s disease, scientists are working hard to learn more about the disease and find innovative ways to better manage it, prevent it from progressing and ultimately curing it.

Currently, you and your healthcare team’s efforts are focused on medical management of your symptoms along with general health and lifestyle improvement recommendations . By identifying individual symptoms and adjusting the course of action based on changes in symptoms, most people with Parkinson’s disease can live fulfilling lives.

The future is hopeful. Some of the research underway includes:

  • Using stem cells to produce new neurons, which would produce dopamine.
  • Producing a dopamine-producing enzyme that is delivered to a gene in the brain that controls movement.
  • Using a naturally occurring human protein – glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, GDNF – to protect dopamine-releasing nerve cells.

Many other investigations are underway too. Much has been learned, much progress has been made and additional discoveries are likely to come.

Can Doctors Miss The Early Signs Of Parkinsons Disease

Parkinson

Yes, doctors are human.

There has been a tremendous increase in human knowledge over recent years. It is not possible for a single person to recognize all the symptoms of all the diseases.

Thus, when a patient only has the early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is often missed.

As noted above, the early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease can be vague.

Even if you have some of these symptoms, your diagnosis needs to be confirmed by a physical examination. This examination detects the early signs of Parkinson’s disease.

Sometimes when the doctor examines you, everything might be perfectly normal. This may be due to one of two things:

  • You don’t have Parkinson’s disease.
  • Your Parkinson’s disease is so mild that treatment is not needed at this stage.
  • The last thing to make sure is that you don’t have a disease that can mimic Parkinson’s disease. This can lead to misdiagnosis.

    If the doctor is not sure, a test called Trodat/F-Dopa scan may help with diagnosis

    What Medications Are Used To Treat Parkinsons Disease

    Medications are the main treatment method for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Your doctor will work closely with you to develop a treatment plan best suited for you based on the severity of your disease at the time of diagnosis, side effects of the drug class and success or failure of symptom control of the medications you try.

    Medications combat Parkinson’s disease by:

    • Helping nerve cells in the brain make dopamine.
    • Mimicking the effects of dopamine in the brain.
    • Blocking an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain.
    • Reducing some specific symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

    Levodopa: Levodopa is a main treatment for the slowness of movement, tremor, and stiffness symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. Nerve cells use levodopa to make dopamine, which replenishes the low amount found in the brain of persons with Parkinson’s disease. Levodopa is usually taken with carbidopa to allow more levodopa to reach the brain and to prevent or reduce the nausea and vomiting, low blood pressure and other side effects of levodopa. Sinemet® is available in an immediate release formula and a long-acting, controlled release formula. Rytary® is a newer version of levodopa/carbidopa that is a longer-acting capsule. The newest addition is Inbrija®, which is inhaled levodopa. It is used by people already taking regular carbidopa/levodopa for when they have off episodes .

    Treatment Options For Early Onset Parkinsons Disease

    Parkinson’s treatment aims to slow the disease’s progression. Medication treatment options may include the following:

    • Levodopa is a chemical that’s converted to dopamine in the brain. People with early onset Parkinson’s may experience more negative side effects, such as involuntary movements.
    • MAO-B inhibitors can help reduce the breakdown of dopamine in the brain.
    • Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors can help extend Levodopa’s effects on the brain.
    • Anticholinergics can help reduce tremors.
    • Amantadine may be used to improve muscle control and relieve stiffness.

    How To Cope With The Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

    The only predictable thing about this disease is that it is unpredictable.— Richard, diagnosed at 36

    Tremors are the first sign noted in about half of all people with Parkinson’s disease. But maybe, like 15 percent of people with the illness, you have never experienced this symptom. That is because Parkinson’s disease affects everyone somewhat differently.

    As you will discover, your symptoms will continue to change, often from day to day, and throughout the course of your life. But even though there is no cure for Parkinson’s, the sooner you can take steps to manage symptoms when they arise, the better chance you will have at maintaining a good quality of life.That is why the first step in coping with the changes that accompany a Parkinson’s diagnosis is to simply increase awareness, to notice new symptoms as well as how your body responds to certain activities, stresses and therapies. A helpful way to do this is by logging your symptom patterns in a daily journal.  It is just a matter of jotting down small changes you notice in your physical and emotional health each day. That way you can discuss these issues promptly with your doctor and receive treatment.

    Tips For Caring For Someone With Parkinsons Disease

    Improving Life for Women with Parkinson

    Caring for a loved one with early onset Parkinson’s can be difficult. If you’re a caregiver for someone with this condition, it’s important that you remember your own emotional and physical health.

    Not only are you dealing with a difficult diagnosis, you’re also managing an increased number of responsibilities. Burnout is common in caregivers, so make sure you’re checking in with your own needs.

    The Michael J. Fox Foundation Center for Parkinson’s Research recommends these tips for caregivers:

    What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

    Each person with Parkinson’s disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms; others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

    In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

    Early stage

    Early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

    Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

    Mid stage

    Mid-late stage

    Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

    Advanced stage

    Defining Populations At Risk For Parkinsons Disease

    One of the areas of research that aims to aid in the early detection and treatment of PD is seeking to identify “biomarkers”—protein or chemicals in the blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid that reliably help diagnose PD, particularly at the early stage. For example, a recent study detected aggregates of alpha-synuclein in the cerebrospinal fluid. These aggregates were found in PD patients but not patients with other neurologic disorders. Many research studies are attempting to identify new biomarkers, particularly those that may even predict whether someone will develop PD over time.5

    What Is Parkinson’s Disease Its A Movement Disorder

    Parkinson’s disease is a progressive brain illness that affects the way you move. In more clinical terms, Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system.

    Normally, there are cells in the brain that produce a chemical called dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the parts of your brain that control movement. When approximately 60-80% of the dopamine-producing brain cells are damaged, symptoms of Parkinson’s disease appear, and you may have trouble moving the way you want.

    Parkinson’s disease is a chronic illness and it slowly progresses over time. While there is no therapy or medicine that cures Parkinson’s disease, there are good treatment options available that can help you live a full life.

    Braaks Hypothesis On How Parkinsons Disease Begins

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    Braak’s hypothesis, named for professor Heiko Braak, MD, who outlined the theory in 2003, suggests that rather than beginning in the brain, Parkinson’s disease begins in the periphery of the body. Braak’s hypothesis proposes that the earliest signs of PD are found in the gut and the olfactory bulb, an area of the brain involved in the sense of smell.2-4

    The accumulation of the protein alpha-synuclein is believed to begin in the gastrointestinal tract or the olfactory bulb before progressing to other areas of the brain. After the aggregates of alpha-synuclein have formed, they appear to be capable of growing and spreading from nerve cell to nerve cell across the brain.2-4

    The appearance of alpha-synuclein aggregates coincides with the appearance of symptoms: alpha-synuclein aggregates in the brainstem correlates with the onset of motor symptoms. Appearance of alpha-synuclein aggregates in the cortex correlates with dementia and cognitive dysfunction.2-4

    Is There A Way To Slow The Progress Of Parkinson’s

    Parkinson’s disease is a progressive disorder, which means its symptoms worsen slowly over time. There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease yet and no known way to slow its progress.

    But there are treatments and medications that can control or reduce the symptoms and help people live productive lives. Some research suggests that regular exercise may slow the progress of Parkinson’s. Physical activity can also alleviate stiffness and other symptoms.

    There are other things a person can do to feel better after a diagnosis of Parkinson’s, such as joining social support groups and learning as much as possible about the disease. It’s also important to make the home safer and less cluttered, since a person with Parkinson’s is more likely to fall.

    While it’s not always easy, neurologists say a positive mindset can also help.

    Learn The First Symptoms And When To Get Treatment

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurological disorder that affects about 1 million people in the United States. It primarily affects neurons in the brain that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine, a chemical messenger that sends signals from the brain to cells throughout the body.

    Parkinson’s is a degenerative illness, meaning it starts with mild symptoms that become worse over time. The early signs of Parkinson’s are usually subtle, but ultimately the disease can cause debilitating symptoms that disrupt both physical and cognitive abilities.

    The cause of Parkinson’s is unknown, but may be a combination of genetics, lifestyle and environmental factors. The risk increases with age, but between 2 and 10 percent of people who develop the disease are diagnosed before age 50.

    Early symptoms of Parkinson’s

    “Parkinson’s does not affect everyone the same way. Symptoms can vary from person to person, and the disease may progress at different rates,” says Melissa Houser, MD, a neurologist at Scripps Clinic Torrey Pines. “In fact, the first signs of Parkinson’s may be vague or associated with other conditions like respiratory infections, making it difficult to know if they are caused by the disease or something else.”

    According to the , the following can be early symptoms. If you or a loved one has more than one of them on a regular basis, it’s a good idea to make an appointment with the doctor. 

     Tremor

     Loss of smell

    Handwriting changes

    Sleeping problems

    Voice changes

    Facial masking

    Alternative Therapies To Treat Parkinsons Disease

    Although no herbs or supplements have been approved by the FDA to treat Parkinson’s, there are a variety of alternative therapies currently being researched.

    • Calcium supplements are often prescribed because dairy makes it harder for the body to absorb levodopa.
    • Coenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant thought to improve mitochondria health. Some researchers believe abnormal function of the mitochondria may play a role in Parkinson’s.
    • Creatine may help increase levels of phosphocreatine, a substance that provides energy to the brain.
    • Folate, aka vitamin B9, is vital to both brain health and the nervous system.
    • Ginger is often recommended to reduce nausea caused by medications.
    • The Mediterranean Diet may help manage symptoms and reduce blood pressure.
    • Vitamin D supplements may be needed to help your body absorb calcium, particularly if you don’t get enough sunshine.
    • Vitamin E may help fight damage to brain cells caused by free radicals, although studies concluded it does nothing to manage symptoms after diagnosis.

    Finally, anecdotal evidence suggests that medical marijuana, now legal in 33 states plus Washington, D.C., may help patients with Parkinson’s disease. The Parkinson’s Foundation has a full page on the research being conducted to determine whether medical marijuana is a viable treatment option for PD patients.

    Depression May Be An Early Symptom Of Parkinsons

    New symptoms of early

    Depression is one of the most common, and most disabling, non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. As many as 50 per cent of people with Parkinson’s experience the symptoms of clinical depression at some stage of the disease. Some people experience depression up to a decade or more before experiencing any motor symptoms of Parkinson’s.

    Clinical depression and anxiety are underdiagnosed symptoms of Parkinson’s. Researchers believe that depression and anxiety in Parkinson’s disease may be due to chemical and physical changes in the area of the brain that affect mood as well as movement. These changes are caused by the disease itself.

    Here are some suggestions to help identify depression in Parkinson’s:

    • Mention changes in mood to your physician if they do not ask you about these conditions.
    • Complete our Geriatric Depression Scale-15 to record your feelings so you can discuss symptoms with your doctor. Download the answer key and compare your responses.
    • delusions and impulse control disorders

    Early Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Can Be Overlooked

    Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are divided into 2 groups: motor symptoms and non-motor symptoms.

    Early non-motor symptoms can be subtle and it’s possible to overlook them as signs of Parkinson’s: for example, anxiety and depression, fatigue, loss of smell, speech problems, difficulty sleeping, erectile dysfunction, incontinence and constipation. Another sign of Parkinson’s is handwriting that becomes smaller.

    Motor symptoms of Parkinson’s can include tremor , slowness of movement , muscle rigidity and instability .

    It’s possible for non-motor symptoms to start occurring up to a decade before any motor symptoms emerge. Years can pass before symptoms are obvious enough to make a person to go to the doctor.

    There’s no ‘one size fits all’ when it comes to Parkinson’s disease — different people will experience different symptoms, and of varying severity. One in 3 people, for example, won’t experience tremor.

    On average, 37 people are diagnosed with Parkinson’s every day in Australia. —Parkinson’s Australia   

    How Early Can Parkinson’s Disease Be Diagnosed

    A: A true determination of Parkinson’s disease is a clinical diagnosis, which means certain motor symptoms have to be present, but we now know more about some early signs of Parkinson’s disease that, while they don’t always lead to the condition, are connected.

    In terms of how early we can detect, we can detect a mutation that is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson’s as early as birth. In the minority of patients who may have a known Parkinson’s-related genetic mutation , that gene could be tested for at any time in life. At the same time, that’s not diagnosing Parkinson’s; it’s just identifying the risk.

    Early warning signs are what we call prodromal, or preclinical, symptoms. Prodromal symptoms are an early warning sign that someone might get Parkinson’s disease. Though some of these symptoms have a very high probability of signaling future Parkinson’s, having one or more of them is still not a 100 percent probability. Some prodromal symptoms are loss of sense of smell, REM behavior disorder, anxiety or depression, and constipation.

    The First Motor Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

    When people ask “what are the early signs and symptoms of PD?” the answer they are typically expecting is one that involves motor symptoms. Early motor symptoms of PD can be a subtle rest tremor of one of the arms or hands . A rest tremor is one that occurs when the limb is completely at rest. If the tremor occurs when the limb is suspended against gravity or actively moving, this may still be a sign of PD, but may also be a sign of essential tremor.

    The initial motor symptom of PD may be a sense of stiffness in one limb, sometimes interpreted as an orthopedic problem . This sense of stiffness may be noted when a person is trying to get on his/her coat for example. A person may also experience a sense of slowness of one hand or a subtle decrease in dexterity of one hand. For example, it may be hard to manipulate a credit card out of a wallet or perform a fast, repetitive motor task such as whisking an egg. A person may notice that one arm does not swing when he/she walks or that one arm is noticeably less active than the other when performing tasks. Another motor sign may be a stoop with walking or a slowing down of walking. A family member may notice that the person blinks infrequently or has less expression in his/her face and voice.

    These motor symptoms may be very subtle. Bottom line – if you are concerned that you may have an early motor or non-motor symptom of Parkinson’s disease, make an appointment with a neurologist for a neurologic exam to discuss your concerns.

    Treatments For Early Onset Parkinson’s Disease

    Parkinson’s Disease: Signs, Risks and Treatme

    The treatments for any case of Parkinson’s disease are the same. Here are the treatments:

    1.       Levodopa- Carbidopa

    Levodopa is one of the first lines of treatments for Parkinson’s disease. The levodopa goes into the brain where it is changed into dopamine. The carbidopa which is combined with Levodopa prevents the levodopa from being changed too soon outside the brain. Carbidopa also helps with some of the side-effects including nausea, dizziness, and low blood pressure. Levodopa effects may wear off with long-term use and cause other side-effects like involuntary movements. This drug is available for oral use and by infusion.

    2.       Dopamine Agonist Medications

    Dopamine agonists act like dopamine inside your brain. They tend to be less effective but the effects last longer. They are often given with levodopa to make it work better. Side-effects includeincreased sexuality, addictive behavior, hallucinations, and lethargy.

    3.       MAO-B Inhibitors

    These stop your brain from breaking down dopamine. They inhibit a chemical in the brain called monoamine oxidase B that reduces the amount of dopamine you have available. Side-effects include inability to sleep and nausea. This medication should not be used with carbidopa-levodopa as this combination can cause hallucinations. They also cannot be taken with anti-depressant medications.

    4.       Catechol-O-methyltransferase Inhibitors

    5.       Anticholinergics

    6.       Amantadine

    7.       Deep Brain Stimulation

    Parkinson Syndrome Symptoms Diagnosis And Test

    Parkinson syndrome is one of the typical diseases in old age. However, diagnosing the disease is often difficult and poses a challenge for medical professionals. If abnormalities occur, many doctors suspect a mental disorder or rheumatism rather than Parkinson’s syndrome.

    In addition to the four typical main symptoms such as muscle tremors, muscle stiffness, sedentary lifestyle and postural disorders, there are also a number of secondary symptoms, we will describe the full spectrum of Parkinson’s symptoms and presents options for early diagnosis through Parkinson’s tests.

    Parkinson Syndrome Symptoms:

    In Parkinson’s syndrome, doctors differentiate between four main and numerous secondary symptoms.

    The four major Parkinson’s symptoms are:

    • Tremor
    • Sedentary lifestyle / slowing down of movements
    • Muscle stiffness
    • Walking and posture disorders

    1 – Tremor

    The hand was just lying quietly in his lap, but when he carefully reached for the coffee cup, it began to tremble violently, the person concerned notices this and is embarrassed, and often tries harder to suppress the tremors, often times that only makes it worse, this tremor, known as tremor, is often the first characteristic sign of Parkinson’s.

    2 – Sedentary Lifestyle

    3 – Muscle Stiffness

    4 – Walking And Posture Disorders

    Quick Tip : See A Doctor Early

    Parkinson Syndrome Side Symptoms

    Changed Facial Expressions And Voice

    Despondency, Loss Of Interest And Drive

    Sleep Disorders

    Circulatory And Digestive Disorders

    • L-Dopa Test

    What Is The Treatment For Parkinson’s Disease

    There is currently no treatment to cure Parkinson’s disease. Several therapies are available to delay the onset of motor symptoms and to ameliorate motor symptoms. All of these therapies are designed to increase the amount of dopamine in the brain either by replacing dopamine, mimicking dopamine, or prolonging the effect of dopamine by inhibiting its breakdown. Studies have shown that early therapy in the non-motor stage can delay the onset of motor symptoms, thereby extending quality of life.

    The most effective therapy for Parkinson’s disease is levodopa , which is converted to dopamine in the brain. However, because long-term treatment with levodopa can lead to unpleasant side effects , its use is often delayed until motor impairment is more severe. Levodopa is frequently prescribed together with carbidopa , which prevents levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. Co-treatment with carbidopa allows for a lower levodopa dose, thereby reducing side effects.

    In earlier stages of Parkinson’s disease, substances that mimic the action of dopamine , and substances that reduce the breakdown of dopamine inhibitors) can be very efficacious in relieving motor symptoms. Unpleasant side effects of these preparations are quite common, including swelling caused by fluid accumulation in body tissues, drowsiness, constipation, dizziness, hallucinations, and nausea.


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