Tuesday, October 19, 2021
Tuesday, October 19, 2021
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How Do I Know If I Have Parkinson’s Disease

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Changes In Sleeping Patterns

What are the important things to know if I have Parkinson’s Disease?

As Parkinsons progresses, you can also develop problems with sleep patterns. These may not happen in the early stages, but can be noticeable later. You might wake up often in the middle of the night or sleep more during the day than you do at night.

Another common sleep disturbance for people with Parkinsons is rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This is when you start acting out your dreams in your sleep, such as verbally and physically, which can get uncomfortable if someone is sharing your bed. Dr. Rundle-Gonzalez says many times a bed partner will be the one to notice sleep problems.

REM sleep behavior disorder can also happen in people who dont have Parkinsons. However, if this isnt something youve dealt with before, its likely related to your disease. There are medications your doctor can prescribe to help you sleep comfortably through the night.

What It Feels Like To Have Parkinsons Disease

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In 1985, science journalist Jon Palfreman investigated a group of drug addicts who were struck with Parkinsons-like symptoms after taking tainted heroin.

Thirty years later, Palfreman was diagnosed with Parkinsons disease himself. His book, “Brain Storms,” describes his journey with the disease and new treatments for patients.

Initially I denied and sought second opinions. I got pretty angry. I tried to keep it secret for a while, just like Michael J. Fox did, Palfreman says, It took me, Id say, about a year before I really processed it properly and then I realized that I had a destiny to use my training as a science journalist and my insights as a patient to explore this malady, which was now going to be part of my life.

About 60,000 people each year in the US alone are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Palfreman says the malady means many things that he used to do automatically, now come with much more difficulty.

It is very much like getting on a plane and going to London and renting a car. You can drive on the left-hand side of the road, but you have to use your conscious brain to pay attention. Everything’s a bit harder. When I walk, I have to sort of consciously move my arms back and forth. Whereas, when a healthy person does it, it’s automatic. And so a lot of things that you got for free you have to work at, Palfreman says.

Palfreman says there are other things people with Parkinsons can do to control the disease.

What Is Canine Parkinsons Disease In Dogs

Canine Parkinsons disease is defined as a progressive neurological condition that dramatically affects motor function. In the simplest of terms, the nervous system is deteriorating which is causing issues with the patients movement.

Progressive means that it gets worse and worse as time goes on.

Whilst you might think it is more common for old dogs to get Parkinsons disease, the truth is actually different as I will explain later.

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What Are Signs And Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

Early diagnosis can greatly increase the effectiveness of Parkinsons treatment. However, Parkinsons symptoms are easy to dismiss as normal signs of aging or other conditions such as stroke or head trauma. For these reasons, people may ignore symptoms or doctors may have a harder time with diagnosis.

What Does Parkinson’s Do To The Brain

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Deep down in your brain, there’s an area called the substantia nigra, which is in the basal ganglia. Some of its cells make dopamine, a chemical that carries messages around your brain. When you need to scratch an itch or kick a ball, dopamine quickly carries a message to the nerve cell that controls that movement.

When that system is working well, your body moves smoothly and evenly. But when you have Parkinson’s, the cells of your substantia nigra start to die. There’s no replacing them, so your dopamine levels drop and you can’t fire off as many messages to control smooth body movements.

Early on, you won’t notice anything different. But as more and more cells die, you reach a tipping point where you start to have symptoms.

That may not be until 80% of the cells are gone, which is why you can have Parkinson’s for quite a while before you realize it.

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Elimination Of Other Conditions

Although no test can diagnose Parkinson’s disease itself, your doctor may order blood tests or imaging studies to rule out other causes of your symptoms.

Your doctor will want to know about any medication or recreational drugs you take, since some drugs can cause symptoms similar to those of Parkinson’s.

Parkinson’s disease doesn’t show up on radiological studies like X-ray, MRI , or CT scans.

Doctors sometimes order dopamine transporter SPECT imaging to determine whether a person with suspected Parkinson’s has a different disorder called essential tremor.

How Is Constipation An Early Warning Sign Of Parkinson’s It’s Such A Common Problem

A: It’s not as specific as other prodromal symptoms, like anosmia. The rate at which people with chronic and unexplained problems with constipation develop Parkinson’s disease is not as easy to pin down. But if someone has unexplained, persistent constipation, it should at least be noted, as it could be considered prodromal.

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Depression And Anxiety Are Also Early Warning Signs Of Parkinson’s How So

A: Like the other symptoms discussed here, late-onset depression and anxiety are nonmotor prodromal manifestations of the condition. It’s not that everyone who is depressed will get Parkinson’s, and the numbers are lower than they are for symptoms like anosmia and REM behavior disorder. But the link is important to explore, and we are doing more research on it all the time.

Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease And Essential Tremor

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The differences between Parkinsons and an essential tremor include:

  • Tremors are mostly seen when the body is at rest in Parkinsons disease.
  • Tremors occur at a higher frequency and when trying to reach things in essential tremor.
  • Both start on one side of the body, commonly in the hands. Some Parkinson plus syndrome starts on both hands.
  • Essential tremors can be seen in other family members 50% of the time.
  • Tremors in head and voice are more common in essential tremor.
  • Other symptoms can be seen in Parkinsons patients including stiffness, balance issues, gait issues, and slowed movements.
  • Parkinsons patients often experience a change in handwriting which makes the letters very small, while essential tremor handwriting gets large and quivery.

There are also other causes for tremors, such as: medication induced tremors, vascular tremors, and metabolic associated tremors. The diagnosis is made based on a complete medical history and physical exam, sometimes with the help of lab and imaging tests, by a neurologist. It is important to write down the symptoms you are having and be as specific as possible so you can share the details with your doctor.

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Its Time To Redefine Early Stage Parkinsons

The Parkinsons Foundation has shared 10 early signs of PD, including tremor, small handwriting, and loss of smell.

While younger people with early-onset PD may have some of the same signs and symptoms as older individuals, the onset may look different, so their issues may not be attributed to PD.

The American Parkinson Disease Association notes that, Because the majority of people who get Parkinsons disease are over the age of 60, the disease is often overlooked in younger people, leading many to go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed for extended periods of time.

My sister was finally referred to a neurologist at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Neurological Restoration in Ohio, as her symptoms slowly but consistently progressed. After multiple tests, including an MRI, cognitive testing, and a movement and balance analysis, she was diagnosed with PD.

One of Bevs early signs was weakness in her left hand, which she attributed to carpal tunnel syndrome. She regularly conducted echocardiograms and electrocardiograms, which required a lot of constant hand movement. She did not have stiffness or balance issues initially, but she did have a slight head tremor.

As Bevs PD progressed, she noticed that her writing was changing. She now has stage 3 PD and said, Sometimes I cant read my own writing. I feel like it looks like chicken scratch!

Bev also has cognitive issues, mostly related to her short-term memory.

Single And Living With Pd

Living alone when you have Parkinsons disease can be very difficult and lonely. Searching for someone with whom to share your life with PD can be even more difficult and lonely. If you have a close friend, co-worker or therapist who is willing to do some role-playing with you, it can help you to identify how and when to tell a date or potential mate/partner.

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What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

Each person with Parkinsons disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinsons disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

Early stage

Early symptoms of Parkinsons disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

Mid stage

Mid-late stage

Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

Advanced stage

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If you’ve been diagnosed with Parkinson’s, your doctor will first prescribe medication. There are many drugs available that improve symptoms, but they have many side effects, including nausea, hallucinations and impulsive behavior. Some patients respond well to medications for years before seeing side effects. In these patients, the drugs may start to wear off quickly, or they may become extremely sensitive to the drugs and experience too much movement

Deep brain stimulation is a surgical option available to patients who are intolerant of medications or who experience serious side effects. This procedure involves implanting electrodes, or wires, deep inside the brain to change irregular brain activity. As a result, it improves motor function in patients with Parkinson’s disease. It is used more often to treat Parkinson’s disease than any other movement disorder.

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How Does Parkinson’s Affect The Body

The telltale symptoms all have to do with the way you move. You usually notice problems like:

Rigid muscles. It can happen on just about any part of your body. Doctors sometimes mistake early Parkinson’s for arthritis.

Slow movements. You may find that even simple acts, like buttoning a shirt, take much longer than usual.

Tremors. Your hands, arms, legs, lips, jaw, or tongue are shaky when you’re not using them.

Walking and balance problems. You may notice your arms aren’t swinging as freely when you walk. Or you can’t take long steps, so you have to shuffle instead.

Parkinson’s can also cause a range of other issues, from depression to bladder problems to acting out dreams. It may be a while before abnormal movements start.

Telling Family About The Diagnosis

Article written by Jackie Hunt Christensen.

There will come a time when you will want to let others know about your diagnosis. Deciding when and how to break the news to your spouse, children, friends and neighbors can be a source of immense stress and worry. While it is impossible to make these conversations pain-free, an important thing to remember is that timing and preparation can help minimize the impact on everyone involved.

To start, you probably do not want to discuss all the details of your illness, but giving those closest to you accurate information about your Parkinsons diagnosis and how you are handling it is essential. This way they are prepared for what could happen down the road and how it will affect them. Think of these interactions as the beginning of a conversation that will hopefully continue as you learn to cope with your illness.

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Severe Headaches Are A Main Symptom Of Parkinson’s Disease

There are several common symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, though severe headaches are not one of them. PD is diagnosed when a person has one or more of the four most common motor symptoms of the disease that include resting tremor, slow movement , rigidity, and difficulty balancing when standing . There are other secondary motor and non-motor symptoms that also occur with PD. Symptoms may be experienced differently by each person and the progression of the disease is different for everyone as well. For example, some people may have tremor as a primary symptom, while another may not have tremors but may have postural instability.

Living With A Dog With Parkinsons Disease

My Experience with how you get diagnosed with Early, Young Onset Parkinson’s Disease?

Living with a dog with any kind of degenerative disease can be challenging. Your dog is likely very confused about what is going on with their body. A dog with Parkinsons disease will feel out of control and betrayed by their body almost.

Its important to be gentle with your dog during this time.

Though Parkinsons disease is incurable and progressive, there are some things your vet may recommend that will help with your dogs quality of life for as long as possible.

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What Is Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons disease is a nervous system disease that affects your ability to control movement. The disease usually starts out slowly and worsens over time. If you have Parkinsons disease, you may shake, have muscle stiffness, and have trouble walking and maintaining your balance and coordination. As the disease worsens, you may have trouble talking, sleeping, have mental and memory problems, experience behavioral changes and have other symptoms.

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What Medications Are Used To Treat Parkinsons Disease

Medications are the main treatment method for patients with Parkinsons disease. Your doctor will work closely with you to develop a treatment plan best suited for you based on the severity of your disease at the time of diagnosis, side effects of the drug class and success or failure of symptom control of the medications you try.

Medications combat Parkinsons disease by:

  • Helping nerve cells in the brain make dopamine.
  • Mimicking the effects of dopamine in the brain.
  • Blocking an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain.
  • Reducing some specific symptoms of Parkinsons disease.

Levodopa: Levodopa is a main treatment for the slowness of movement, tremor, and stiffness symptoms of Parkinsons disease. Nerve cells use levodopa to make dopamine, which replenishes the low amount found in the brain of persons with Parkinsons disease. Levodopa is usually taken with carbidopa to allow more levodopa to reach the brain and to prevent or reduce the nausea and vomiting, low blood pressure and other side effects of levodopa. Sinemet® is available in an immediate release formula and a long-acting, controlled release formula. Rytary® is a newer version of levodopa/carbidopa that is a longer-acting capsule. The newest addition is Inbrija®, which is inhaled levodopa. It is used by people already taking regular carbidopa/levodopa for when they have off episodes .

What Lifestyle Changes Can I Make To Ease Parkinsons Symptoms

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Exercise: Exercise helps improve muscle strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, and tremor. It is also strongly believed to improve memory, thinking and reduce the risk of falls and decrease anxiety and depression. One study in persons with Parkinsons disease showed that 2.5 hours of exercise per week resulted in improved ability to move and a slower decline in quality of life compared to those who didnt exercise or didnt start until later in the course of their disease. Some exercises to consider include strengthening or resistance training, stretching exercises or aerobics . All types of exercise are helpful.

Eat a healthy, balanced diet: This is not only good for your general health but can ease some of the non-movement related symptoms of Parkinsons, such as constipation. Eating foods high in fiber in particular can relieve constipation. The Mediterranean diet is one example of a healthy diet.

Preventing falls and maintaining balance: Falls are a frequent complication of Parkinson’s. While you can do many things to reduce your risk of falling, the two most important are: 1) to work with your doctor to ensure that your treatments whether medicines or deep brain stimulation are optimal and 2) to consult with a physical therapist who can assess your walking and balance. The physical therapist is the expert when it comes to recommending assistive devices or exercise to improve safety and preventing falls.

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