Friday, January 28, 2022
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What Prevents Parkinson’s Disease



What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

How to Prevent Parkinson

The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease include tremors or trembling ; difficulty maintaining balance and coordination; trouble standing or walking; stiffness; and general slowness.

Over time, a person with Parkinson’s may have trouble smiling, talking, or swallowing. Their faces may appear flat and without expression, but people with Parkinson’s continue to have feelings — even though their faces don’t always show it. Sometimes people with the disease can have trouble with thinking and remembering too.

Because of problems with balance, some people with Parkinson’s fall down a lot, which can result in broken bones. Some people with Parkinson’s may also feel sad or and lose interest in the things they used to do.

The symptoms of Parkinson’s disease appear gradually and get worse over time. But because Parkinson’s disease usually develops slowly, most people who have it can live a long and relatively healthy life.

What Is The Outlook For Persons With Parkinsons Disease

Although there is no cure or absolute evidence of ways to prevent Parkinson’s disease, scientists are working hard to learn more about the disease and find innovative ways to better manage it, prevent it from progressing and ultimately curing it.

Currently, you and your healthcare team’s efforts are focused on medical management of your symptoms along with general health and lifestyle improvement recommendations . By identifying individual symptoms and adjusting the course of action based on changes in symptoms, most people with Parkinson’s disease can live fulfilling lives.

The future is hopeful. Some of the research underway includes:

  • Using stem cells to produce new neurons, which would produce dopamine.
  • Producing a dopamine-producing enzyme that is delivered to a gene in the brain that controls movement.
  • Using a naturally occurring human protein – glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, GDNF – to protect dopamine-releasing nerve cells.

Many other investigations are underway too. Much has been learned, much progress has been made and additional discoveries are likely to come.

In Summary Reduce Your Stress

The most important thing we can do for our long-term health, both physical and cognitive, is to reduce the stress in our bodies. All stress – physical, emotional and chemical – causes inflammation and long-term damage throughout the body.

Whether you’re seeking Parkinson’s prevention techniques or ways to alleviate symptoms, any of the above dietary and lifestyle practices can have long-term health benefits. Drinking green tea, eating organic, local vegetables, and regular aerobic exercise all significantly reduce the long-term cumulative damage done by stress.

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Combine Exercise With Diet

Dr. Gostkowski says if you want to feel your best, combine a healthy diet with . Research has shown that regular exercise can improve PD symptoms.

“Do exercise that raises your heart rate,” Dr. Gostkowski says. “Aim for about 30 minutes a day, five days a week.” Don’t worry about specific exercises. Do an activity you enjoy, as long as it gets your heart rate up. Try brisk walking or biking or more advanced exercise for veteran athletes. “I recommend seeing an occupational therapist. They can tailor an exercise program to your needs.”

Try The Ketogenic Diet

Best Life: How to prevent Parkinson

The ketogenic diet is characterized by a high fat intake—typically 80 to 90 percent of total calories—moderate protein intake, and a very low carbohydrate intake. Originally developed as a treatment for refractory epilepsy in children, the ketogenic diet has exploded in popularity in recent years.

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A growing body of clinical research shows the health benefits of the ketogenic diet, including weight loss and improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors. However, some of the most exciting findings related to the ketogenic diet deals with its impact on neurological diseases like Parkinson’s. In animal models of PD, the ketogenic diet reduces mitochondrial damage and improves motor function. In humans, the diet improves both motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. There are two primary ways the ketogenic diet alleviates symptoms of PD:

  • Ketones are an alternative fuel source for the brain. The human brain typically relies on glucose for energy. In PD, part of the process required to produce energy from glucose is impaired, making glucose an inefficient fuel source. Ketones bypass that process and are readily taken up by the brain, so they serve as an efficient alternative energy source for neurons.
  • Ketone metabolism decreases oxidative stress in the brain and reduces neuroinflammation, thus alleviating two of the underlying causes of PD.

eating this way three to four times per year can protect against PD

Natural Remedies And Treatments For Parkinsons Disease That Get Powerful Results

To successfully treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s, andeven reverse this disorder, there are 4 things you must do…

a)  Increase your natural dopamine levels 

b)  Detox your body of all heavy metals andpollutants 

c)  Reduce all inflammation in the body,especially the brain

d) Repair the neuro pathways 

These 10 natural treatments and remedies do all four. Solet’s not waste any more time then. Here they are in order of importance…

Scientifically Backed Ways To Prevent Parkinsons Disease

Dopamine plays a major role in a variety of mental and physical functions, including:

  • Voluntary movement
  • Memory
  • General behavior

Parkinson’s now afflicts roughly 1.5 million people in the United States alone, with primary symptoms being body tremors, slow movement, rigid limbs, reduced memory, a shuffling gait and speech impairment. So we have to ask:

1.) What causes it?

2.) How do we prevent it?

Currently there isn’t a known cure, and it’s not fully understood what causes the dip in dopamine; however, we know that aging is the single most important risk factor for PD, with inflammation and stress contributing to cell damage. And we now know enough about the disease to understand the preventative measures that counter the aging and death of the neurons under attack.

Because there is no known cure, it’s critical that we prevent the disease before symptoms arise. Granted, thanks to recent advancements in modern surgical procedures, there are some safe surgeries that can mitigate some of the more severe symptoms associated with PD. The most common one now is deep brain stimulation, in which they implant an electrode into the brain that can stop some of the more severe symptoms of Parkinson’s.

But this article will try to keep it from getting to that point. The less drugs and surgery we can have in our lives, the better.

Natural Remedies And Treatments For Parkinsons Finalnote

So there you have our top 10 natural remedies andtreatments for reversing Parkinson’s disease. We believe this is one of the most informative andthorough health articles on this disease you’ll find anywhere on the internet. Ifyou follow these 10 tips to-the-letter and continue to use them consistently,we guarantee that in 3-6 months’ time you will be truly astounded at themiraculous level of improvement you’ll see. In 12 months’ time you will scarcely recognize yourself! . But of course, you must stickwith them and follow through with each remedy every day if you want them towork. We sincerely hope you do.

Good luck and best wishes.

P.S. Because Parkinson’s is closely linked to Alzheimer’s disease and actually goes under the “dementia umbrella”, we recommend you take the time to read our “Powerful Natural Remedies for Dementia and Alzheimer’s” article for a more complete and comprehensive understanding on the causes and treatments for these diseases. You can click on the link below to go there…

Black Americans And Parkinsons Disease

Most research suggests that Parkinson’s disease is more likely to affect whites and Hispanics.

But, some studies have shown that Black patients may be less likely to receive proper care for the disease. 

A review published in 2018 in  found there are racial disparities when it comes to managing Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers identified one study that showed Black patients were 4 times less likely than whites to be started on treatment for Parkinson’s.

Another study found an average seven-year delay in diagnosis among Black patients.

How Is Parkinsons Diagnosed

Doctors use your medical history and physical examination to diagnose Parkinson’s disease . No blood test, brain scan or other test can be used to make a definitive diagnosis of PD.

Researchers believe that in most people, Parkinson’s is caused by a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Certain environmental exposures, such as pesticides and head injury, are associated with an increased risk of PD. Still, most people have no clear exposure that doctors can point to as a straightforward cause. The same goes for genetics. Certain genetic mutations are linked to an increased risk of PD. But in the vast majority of people, Parkinson’s is not directly related to a single genetic mutation. Learning more about the genetics of Parkinson’s is one of our best chances to understand more about the disease and discover how to slow or stop its progression.

Aging is the greatest risk factor for Parkinson’s, and the average age at diagnosis is 60. Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

Men are diagnosed with Parkinson’s at a higher rate than women and whites more than other races. Researchers are studying these disparities to understand more about the disease and health care access and to improve inclusivity across care and research. 

Aging is the greatest risk factor for Parkinson’s, and the average age at diagnosis is 60. Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

The Michael J. Fox Foundation has made finding a test for Parkinson’s disease one of our top priorities.

What Is Parkinsons Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by a gradual loss of neurons in the brain that produce the crucial neurotransmitter dopamine; mitochondrial dysfunction; neuroinflammation; oxidative stress; and an accumulation of “misfolded” proteins in neurons. Together, these factors damage the central nervous system and impair motor function, causing the hallmark symptoms of PD:

  • Stiff muscles
  • Difficulty with standing, walking, and other bodily movements
  • Involuntary movements
  • Reduced or lost sense of smell
  • Reduced facial expression
  • Constipation

Parkinson’s disease is increasingly common, but it doesn’t have to be. Here are the most common causes of the disease and 11 ways you can prevent it through diet, exercise, and lifestyle. #optimalhealth #healthylifestyle #chriskresser

What Causes Parkinson’s Disease

In the very deep parts of the brain, there is a collection of nerve cells that help control movement, known as the basal ganglia . In a person with Parkinson’s disease, these nerve cells are damaged and do not work as well as they should.

These nerve cells make and use a brain chemical called dopamine  to send messages to other parts of the brain to coordinate body movements. When someone has Parkinson’s disease, dopamine levels are low. So, the body doesn’t get the right messages it needs to move normally.

Experts agree that low dopamine levels in the brain cause the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, but no one really knows why the nerve cells that produce dopamine get damaged and die.

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Natural Remedy For Parkinsons #4 Chlorella And Borax:

These vitamins may help prevent Parkinson’s disease

If you have a neurological disease such as Parkinson’s orAlzheimer’s, the importance of removing heavy metals from the body – especiallyfrom the brain and nervous system – cannot be overstated. Heavy metalsaccumulate in the brain and nervous system at a rapid rate and cause damage tothe neurological pathways and “brain inflammation”. Fluoride is one ofthe worst, however, mercury, lead, aluminium and cadmium are also extremely dangerous.Chlorella and borax not only remove these heavy metals completely, theycontinue to prevent further toxic build-ups.

Chlorella is a miracle blue-green algae and one of themost powerful detoxifiers and chelators yet discovered. Whenit’s combined with cilantro, its benefits are enhancedsignificantly. A Russian study found that chlorella, combined with cilantro,was able to remove all heavy metals from the body, including fluoride and mercury,with no adverse or harmful side effects. You can purchase chlorellain powdered form online or from most health food stores. Just make sure you buythe Broken Cell Wall Chlorella as this is the strongest and most bio-available.For dosage recommendations, simply follow the directions on the container.

How Is Parkinson’s Disease Diagnosed

Someone with the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease may be sent to see a , a doctor who specializes in the brain, nerves, and muscles. The neurologist may do some tests, including a brain scan and blood tests. These tests will not make the diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease, but the doctor will want to make sure that there is no other problem causing the symptoms. To diagnose Parkinson’s disease, the doctor relies on a person’s medical history, symptoms, and a physical exam.

No One Definitive Cause Of Parkinsons

There are no biomarkers or objective screening tests that indicate one has Parkinson’s. That said, medical experts have shown that a constellation of factors are linked to it.

Parkinson’s causes are likely a blend of genetics and environmental or other unknown factors. “About 10 to 20 percent of Parkinson’s disease cases are linked to a genetic cause,” says Ted Dawson, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Institute for Cell Engineering at Johns Hopkins. The types are either autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive .

But that leaves the majority of Parkinson’s cases as idiopathic, which means unknown. “We think it’s probably a combination of environmental exposure — to toxins or pesticides — and your genetic makeup,” says Dawson.

Age. The biggest risk factor for developing Parkinson’s is advancing age. The average age of onset is 60.

Gender. Men are more likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than women.

Genetics. Individuals with a parent or sibling who is affected have approximately two times the chance of developing Parkinson’s. “There’s been an enormous amount of new information about genetics and new genes identified over the past 10 or 15 years that have opened up a greater understanding of the disease,” says Dawson.

First Hints Parkinson’s Can Be Stopped

It may be possible to stop the progression of Parkinson’s disease with a drug normally used in type 2 diabetes, a clinical trial suggests.

Current drugs help manage the symptoms, but do not prevent brain cells dying.

The trial on 62 patients, published in the Lancet, hints the medicine halted the progression of the disease.

The University College London team is “excited”, but it urges caution as any long-term benefit is uncertain and the drug needs more testing.

“There’s absolutely no doubt the most important unmet need in Parkinson’s is a drug to slow down disease progression, it’s unarguable,” Prof Tom Foltynie, one of the researchers, told the BBC.

In Parkinson’s, the brain is progressively damaged and the cells that produce the hormone dopamine are lost.

It leads to a tremor, difficulty moving and eventually memory problems.

Therapies help manage symptoms by boosting dopamine levels, but the death of the brain continues and the disease gets worse.

No drug stops that happening.

Make Sure You Get Enough Vitamin D And Omega

Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease, whereas vitamin D supplementation and sunlight exposure are associated with a reduced risk. How does vitamin D combat neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease? A high density of vitamin D receptors reside in the part of the brain most affected by Parkinson’s disease; this finding suggests that vitamin D regulates the function of neurons.

Vitamin D also lessens the severity of autoimmunity and regulates neurotrophins, proteins that induce the survival, development, and function of neurons. Vitamin D is one nutrient you won’t want to skimp on if your goal is to prevent Parkinson’s disease!Safe sun exposure is the best method for boosting vitamin D levels. However, full-body sun exposure is not possible for most people year-round; in this case, I recommend you take cod liver oil and eat fatty cold-water fish, beef liver, and egg yolks to obtain dietary vitamin D.

Omega-3 fatty acids, like EPA and DHA, are critical for normal brain development and function across the lifespan. Low levels of EPA and DHA increase the risk of neurodegeneration, whereas omega-3 supplementation can help reduce neuron death in the brain, alleviate neuroinflammation, boost antioxidant enzymes, and relieve motor symptoms in PD. EPA and DHA are abundant in seafood, so I recommend consuming two to three servings of seafood per week to achieve a healthy intake of these neuroprotective fatty acids.

What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

Each person with Parkinson’s disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms; others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

Early stage

Early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

Mid stage

Mid-late stage

Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

Advanced stage

Naturalremedy For Parkinsons #7 Omega

Animal based omega-3 fatty acids are a powerful weapon inthe fight against Parkinson’s disease. One of the main fatty acids, DHA, is oneof the essential building blocks for the human brain. Half of your brain andeyes are made up of fat – and a large proportion of this is DHA fat.

Omega-3 fatty acids have the unique ability to cross theblood-brain barrier, something most conventional drugs cannot do. They helpincrease dopamine levels and reduce neuroinflammation in the brain, while atthe same time, stimulating neuron growth. So basically, EPA and DHA help preventbrain cell damage and keep the nervous system in tip top working order!   

Best sources of animal based omega-3’s are either fishoil, cod liver oil or krill oil. High strength krill oil is the preferred option as thiscontains a substance called Astaxanthin. Astaxanthin is a potent “brain food” nutrientthat has been shown to prevent neurodegeneration and inflammation of the brain.For dosages, take AT LEAST the highest recommended amount listed on the bottle– the same goes with fish oil or cod liver oil. You can’t “overdose” on thesesupplements so there’s nothing to be concerned about. In fact, the more omega-3’syou can get into you the better the results!

In addition to this, try and eat some cold water fattyfish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel, sardines or herring 3-4 times a week foran extra supply of DHA and EPA. 

How Is Parkinsons Disease Treated

There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease. However, medications and other treatments can help relieve some of your symptoms. Exercise can help your Parkinson’s symptoms significantly. In addition, physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language therapy can help with walking and balance problems, eating and swallowing challenges and speech problems. Surgery is an option for some patients.

Physical Activity Can Reduce The Risks Of Parkinson’s Disease

5 Nutritional Hacks To Prevent Parkinson

Physical activity plays an active role in the prevention and treatment of PD. The relationship between physical activity and risk of PD was first reported in the Nurses’ Health Study and HPFS, and later in five other longitudinal studies . The results of prospective epidemiological studies suggest that active physical activity reduces the risk of PD in men, but the mechanism is uncertain . There is no strong supporting evidence for the hypothesis that physical activity can prevent male PD in the Harvard Alumni Health Study. Nevertheless, a smaller sample size study shows a negative and nonsignificant association between physical activity and PD . A study of 143,325 participants from CPS-II-N has found that vigorous activity was associated with PD in men and women, while a reduction in PD risk through moderate to vigorous activity . The study of 213,701 participants of NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study cohort also confirmed this view that higher levels of moderate to vigorous activities at ages 35-39 or in the past ten years as reported in 1996-1997 were associated with low PD incidence after 2000, which was with a significant dose-response relationship. Compared to individuals who were inactive during the two periods, the risk of PD reduced by approximately 40% in the further analysis . Another study from the Swedish National March cohort showed that the total amount of daily activity was associated with a lower risk of PD, but women’s correlation was not apparent to men .

Eat Organic Whenever Possible

More research needs to be done on this subject, but many experts now believe pesticides can increase the risk of Parkinson’s disease. Researchers have found high levels of pesticides inside the brains of people with Parkinson’s, and those chemicals can suppress the production of dopamine. Products that are certified organic aren’t supposed to contain any chemical pesticides or herbicides.

History Of Parkinsons Disease

Symptoms and possible treatments for Parkinson’s were discussed in texts related to Ayurveda, an ancient Indian medical practice that’s been around since as early as 5,000 B.C. A Parkinson’s-like condition was also mentioned in the first Chinese medical text, Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen, more than 2,500 years ago.

Parkinson’s disease was formally recognized in an 1817 paper, “An Essay on the Shaking Palsy,” by James Parkinson, MD, a London doctor and member of the Royal College of Surgeons.

Dr. Parkinson observed what are now known as the classic symptoms of Parkinsons disease, including tremors, rigidity, and postural instability. He theorized that the disease developed because of a problem in the brain’s medulla region.

Parkinson’s essay received little attention until 1861, when French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot and his colleagues distinguished the disease from other neurological conditions and termed it “’s disease.”

Adopt A Regular Sleep Rhythm

Optimizing your circadian rhythm and improving your sleep promotes brain health and may reduce your risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. To optimize your rhythm, create a regular sleep–wake schedule and sleep in a room that is completely dark and free of light pollution from electronic devices. Avoid using blue light-emitting devices, such as computers and cell phones, several hours before bed. If you must use these devices, wear a pair of blue light-blocking glasses while doing so; the glasses prevent blue light from disrupting your sleep rhythm.

How Do I Prevent Falls From Common Hazards

  • Floors: Remove all loose wires, cords, and throw rugs. Minimize clutter. Make sure rugs are anchored and smooth. Keep furniture in its usual place.
  • Bathroom: Install grab bars and non-skid tape in the tub or shower. Use non-skid bath mats on the floor or install wall-to-wall carpeting.
  • Lighting: Make sure halls, stairways, and entrances are well-lit. Install a night light in your bathroom or hallway and staircase. Turn lights on if you get up in the middle of the night. Make sure lamps or light switches are within reach of the bed if you have to get up during the night.
  • Kitchen: Install non-skid rubber mats near the sink and stove. Clean spills immediately.
  • Stairs: Make sure treads, rails, and rugs are secure. Install a rail on both sides of the stairs. If stairs are a threat, it might be helpful to arrange most of your activities on the lower level to reduce the number of times you must climb the stairs.
  • Entrances and doorways: Install metal handles on the walls adjacent to the doorknobs of all doors to make it more secure as you travel through the doorway.

When Getting Dressed

  • Allow yourself plenty of time to get ready. Avoid rushing.
  • Select clothes that are easy to put on and take off.
  • Try using items with Velcro instead of buttons.
  • Try wearing pants and skirts with elastic waist bands. These may be easier than buttons and zippers.

Yoga uses targeted muscle movement to build muscle, increase mobility, and improve flexibility. People with Parkinson’s may notice yoga even helps manage tremors in some affected limbs. Try these 10 yoga poses to help ease symptoms of Parkinson’s.


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