Thursday, June 16, 2022
Thursday, June 16, 2022
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How Can Someone Get Parkinson’s Disease

Average Age Of Parkinson’s Diagnosis

Why do people get Parkinson’s?

Parkinson’s disease is a brain condition that causes shaking, problems with balance and coordination, and stiffness in your arms and legs. There’s no cure for it, but there are treatments that can help with your symptoms, so an early diagnosis is important.

Doctors believe that most people start to show signs of Parkinson’s disease sometime in middle age. The average age for someone to be diagnosed with Parkinson’s is around 60 years old.

Your odds of developing the condition rise with your age, but only to a certain point it’s more common in people between ages 70 and 80 than it is in people who are between ages 60 and 70. But if you haven’t been diagnosed with Parkinson’s by the time you’re 80 years old, your odds of getting it are small in fact, they’re substantially smaller than they were when you were 60 or 70.

What Is Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons disease is a progressive brain disorder that affects mobility and mental ability. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Parkinsons, you may be wondering about life expectancy.

According to some research, on average, people with Parkinsons can expect to live almost as long as those who dont have the condition.

Parkinsons Disease Symptoms Of Dementia

Up to one-third of people living with Parkinson’s disease experience dementia, according to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation. Problems with dementia may include trouble with memory, attention span, and what is called executive function the process of making decisions, organizing, managing time, and setting priorities.

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What Is Canine Parkinsons Disease In Dogs

Canine Parkinsons disease is defined as a progressive neurological condition that dramatically affects motor function. In the simplest of terms, the nervous system is deteriorating which is causing issues with the patients movement.

Progressive means that it gets worse and worse as time goes on.

Whilst you might think it is more common for old dogs to get Parkinsons disease, the truth is actually different as I will explain later.

How Is Parkinson Disease Diagnosed

people with parkinsons disease at higher risk of dying

Parkinson disease can be hard to diagnose. No single test can identify it. Parkinson can be easily mistaken for another health condition. A healthcare provider will usually take a medical history, including a family history to find out if anyone else in your family has Parkinson’s disease. He or she will also do a neurological exam. Sometimes, an MRI or CT scan, or some other imaging scan of the brain can identify other problems or rule out other diseases.

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What Is The Treatment For Parkinson’s Disease

    There is currently no treatment to cure Parkinson’s disease. Several therapies are available to delay the onset of motor symptoms and to ameliorate motor symptoms. All of these therapies are designed to increase the amount of dopamine in the brain either by replacing dopamine, mimicking dopamine, or prolonging the effect of dopamine by inhibiting its breakdown. Studies have shown that early therapy in the non-motor stage can delay the onset of motor symptoms, thereby extending quality of life.

    The most effective therapy for Parkinson’s disease is levodopa , which is converted to dopamine in the brain. However, because long-term treatment with levodopa can lead to unpleasant side effects , its use is often delayed until motor impairment is more severe. Levodopa is frequently prescribed together with carbidopa , which prevents levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. Co-treatment with carbidopa allows for a lower levodopa dose, thereby reducing side effects.

    In earlier stages of Parkinson’s disease, substances that mimic the action of dopamine , and substances that reduce the breakdown of dopamine inhibitors) can be very efficacious in relieving motor symptoms. Unpleasant side effects of these preparations are quite common, including swelling caused by fluid accumulation in body tissues, drowsiness, constipation, dizziness, hallucinations, and nausea.

    Living With Parkinson Disease

    These measures can help you live well with Parkinson disease:

    • An exercise routine can help keep muscles flexible and mobile. Exercise also releases natural brain chemicals that can improve emotional well-being.
    • High protein meals can benefit your brain chemistry
    • Physical, occupational, and speech therapy can help your ability to care for yourself and communicate with others
    • If you or your family has questions about Parkinson disease, want information about treatment, or need to find support, you can contact the American Parkinson Disease Association.

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    Should You Put Your Dog Down If Their Parkinsons Is Bad

    I cannot answer that question for you. Your decision to euthanize a dog with Parkinsons disease is highly personal. If your dogs quality of life is truly poor, with no independence at all, the kinder thing may be to put them down.

    Its a decision we never want to make, but sometimes it really is the best thing for them.

    Consult your veterinarian for advice on how long your dog can expect to remain mobile and when euthanasia may be the sole solution.

    Parkinson’s Disease Risk Factors

    How can changes to diet help people with Parkinson’s?

    Although a primary cause for Parkinson’s disease is yet to be identified, a number of risk factors are clearly evident.

    Advancing age– Although there is the occasional case of the disease being developed as a young adult, it generally manifests itself in the middle to late years of life. The risk continues to increase the older one gets. Some researchers assume that people with Parkinson’s have neural damage from genetic or environmental factors that get worse as they age.

    Sex- Males are more likely to get Parkinson’s than females. Possible reasons for this may be that males have greater exposure to other risk factors such as toxin exposure or head trauma. It has been theorised that oestrogen may have neuro-protective effects. Or, in the case of genetic predisposition, a gene predisposing someone to Parkinson’s may be linked to the X chromosome.

    Family history– Having one or more close relatives with the disease increases the likelihood that you will get it, but to a minimal degree. This lends support to the idea that there is a genetic link in developing Parkinson’s.

    – Post menopausal who do not use hormone replacement therapy are at greater risk, as are those who have had hysterectomies.

    Low levels of B vitamin folate– Researchers discovered that mice with a deficiency of this vitamin developed severe Parkinson’s symptoms, while those with normal levels did not.

    Read Also: Why Is Parkinson’s Disease More Common In Males

    Possible Risk Reduction Factors

    While age, genetics, and being a man make it more likely you’ll develop Parkinson’s disease, some factors make it less likely. It is generally believed that Asian-Americans and African-Americans seem to have a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s as compared to Caucasians. Drinking coffee may lower risk, as a 30-year study of Japanese-American men found the greater amount of coffee they drank, the lower their risk of Parkinson’s disease became.

    What Causes Parkinson’s Disease

    Parkinson’s disease occurs when nerve cells, or neurons, in an area of the brain that controls movement become impaired and/or die. Normally, these neurons produce an important brain chemical known as dopamine. When the neurons die or become impaired, they produce less dopamine, which causes the movement problems of Parkinson’s. Scientists still do not know what causes cells that produce dopamine to die.

    People with Parkinson’s also lose the nerve endings that produce norepinephrine, the main chemical messenger of the sympathetic nervous system, which controls many functions of the body, such as heart rate and blood pressure. The loss of norepinephrine might help explain some of the non-movement features of Parkinson’s, such as fatigue, irregular blood pressure, decreased movement of food through the digestive tract, and sudden drop in blood pressure when a person stands up from a sitting or lying-down position.

    Many brain cells of people with Parkinson’s contain Lewy bodies, unusual clumps of the protein alpha-synuclein. Scientists are trying to better understand the normal and abnormal functions of alpha-synuclein and its relationship to genetic mutations that impact Parkinsons disease and Lewy body dementia.

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    Can Dogs Get Parkinsons Disease + What Are The Signs

    Parkinsons is an unfortunate part of many peoples lives. On average, 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinsons disease every year. As people get older, they become more susceptible to neurological disease. But did you know that dogs can also suffer with neurological disorders?

    Can dogs get Parkinsons disease? Just like humans, dogs can get Parkinsons disease. Whilst canine Parkinsons is similar to the human disease in many ways, there are difference in the ways in which Parkinsons disease affects dogs.

    How To Prevent Parkinsons Disease

    Series on Parkinsons Disease  Neurology &  Sleep Centre

    There is no definite way to prevent Parkinson’s disease. However, research suggests that the following lifestyle factors can make a difference:

    Eating turmeric: Turmeric is an antioxidant, so it can help to prevent Lewy bodies in the brain, according to a laboratory study. Berries, apples and red grapes can also have the same effect.

    Avoiding aldehydes: Some scientists have linked aldehydes to increase the risk of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease and dementia.

    Banishing toxic chemicals: Exposure to pesticides, herbicides and other toxins can increase the risk of neurological diseases. You should try to avoid these chemicals and make sure you wear the appropriate protective clothing if you do have to make contact.

    The causes of Parkinsons disease are largely unknown. However, these recent findings do help to shed light on the condition. Many people with Parkinsons find that information helps them feel reassured and in control.

    If you still have questions concerning Parkinsons disease causes and treatment, its best to consult your doctor or contact a reputable organization for support, such as the National Parkinsons Foundation Helpline .

    APA ReferenceSmith, E. . Parkinsons Causes: How Do You Get Parkinsons Disease?, HealthyPlace. Retrieved on 2021, September 7 from https://www.healthyplace.com/parkinsons-disease/parkinsons-causes-how-do-you-get-parkinsons-disease

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    What Else Do We Know

    As scientists try to learn what’s at the root of Parkinson’s, they’re looking far and wide to pick up clues where they can.

    They’ve found that people with Parkinson’s tend to have something called Lewy bodies in their brain. These are unusual clumps of a protein called alpha-synuclein. The protein itself is normal, but the clumps are not. And they’re found in parts of the brain that affect sleep and sense of smell, which could explain some symptoms of Parkinson’s not related to movement.

    Your gut may also have a part in it, as some of its cells make dopamine, too. Some doctors think that this might be where the earliest signs of Parkinson’s show up, but that idea needs more research.

    How Similar Is Canine Parkinsons Disease To The Human Condition

    Parkinsons disease in dogs is very similar to how it affects humans.

    Firstly, both unpredictably affect your movement. Both dogs and humans with this disease can expect to have sudden moments of stiffness. This could be any limb but also the face.

    Equally, both can expect surprise tremors and shakes. This is often one of the first things owners notice in their dogs a Parkinson like tremor in dogs or the dog shaking his head like Parkinsons

    The core of the disease is the same in both dogs and humans.

    However, it is important to recognize the different ways Parkinsons presents in dogs and humans.

    A huge reason why Parkinsons disease is difficult to spot in dogs in the early stages is because they dont speak. Their faces also dont express the same ways that ours do.

    The first signs of Parkinsons in humans are mostly not being able to move the face in the same way or slurred speech.

    Unless you have a real-life Scooby-Doo in your life that is linguistically gifted, its most likely you wont spot the signs of Parkinsons in your dog until their limbs are affected with those Parkinsons tremors I mentioned a moment ago.

    Another critical difference is with the age groups that Parkinsons most affects. As I said in the intro, it is usually the over 50s that are affected by this pervasive disease in the human world.

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    Learn Everything You Can About The Disease

    Parkinsons disease is a movement disorder. If youre a caregiver for someone living with Parkinsons, youre likely familiar with some of the symptoms of the disease. But do you know what causes its symptoms, how the condition progresses, or what treatments can help manage it? Also, Parkinsons doesnt manifest the same way in everyone.

    To be the best ally for your loved one, learn as much as you can about Parkinsons disease. Do research on reputable websites like the Parkinsons Foundation, or read books about the condition. Tag along for medical appointments and ask the doctor questions. If youre well informed, youll have a better idea of what to expect and how to be the most help.

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    Stooping Or Hunching Over

    Are you not standing up as straight as you used to? If you or your family or friends notice that you seem to be stooping, leaning or slouching when you stand, it could be a sign of Parkinson’s disease .

    What is normal?If you have pain from an injury or if you are sick, it might cause you to stand crookedly. Also, a problem with your bones can make you hunch over.

    Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms: Life Expectancy

    Even though Parkinson’s disease is a serious, progressive condition, it is not considered a fatal illness. People who have Parkinson’s disease usually have the same average life expectancy as people without the disease.

    But when the disease is in its advanced stages, Parkinson’s symptoms can lead to life-threatening complications, including:

    • Falls that lead to fractured bones
    • Pneumonia
    • Choking

    Thinking about the progression of Parkinson’s disease can be frightening. But proper treatments can help you live a full, productive life for years to come. And researchers hope to one day find ways to halt the progression of Parkinson’s and restore lost functioning.

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    Parkinsons Disease In Dogs

    Canine Parkinsons disease manifests in many similar symptoms to humans, such as tremors and a loss of balance. However, there are some key differences too.

    In this guide, Ill break down the differences between Parkinsons disease in humans and dogs and the signs you should look out for. There are also some tips on how to care for your dog if they have unfortunately been diagnosed with Parkinsons disease and neurological disorders.

    Before we get into it, its important I stress that I am not a veterinarian. I am just a dog owner and lover. Please consult your professional veterinarian to verify any and all information in this article.

    What Raises Someone’s Risk For Parkinson’s

    Parkinson

    It’s a complex picture, but you may be more likely to get Parkinson’s based on:

    Age. Since it mostly affects people 60 and older, your risk goes up as the years go by.

    Family history. If your parent, brother, or sister has it, you’re a little more likely to get it.

    Job. Some types of work, like farming or factory jobs, can cause you to have contact with chemicals linked to Parkinson’s.

    Race. It shows up more often in white people than other groups.

    Serious head injury. If you hit your head hard enough to lose consciousness or forget things as a result of it, you may be more likely to get Parkinson’s later in life.

    Gender. Men get it more than women. Doctors aren’t sure why.

    Where you live. People in rural areas seem to get it more often, which may be tied to chemicals used in farming.

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    Do Only Old People Get Parkinson’s Disease

    Although Parkinson’s disease is much more common in people who are older than age 50, it can affect people of all ages, including even children and teenagers.

    Also, just because you’re older, it doesn’t mean you’ll get Parkinson’s most people never get it. Your age is only one factor in your risks for the condition.

    Living With A Dog With Parkinsons Disease

    Living with a dog with any kind of degenerative disease can be challenging. Your dog is likely very confused about what is going on with their body. A dog with Parkinsons disease will feel out of control and betrayed by their body almost.

    Its important to be gentle with your dog during this time.

    Though Parkinsons disease is incurable and progressive, there are some things your vet may recommend that will help with your dogs quality of life for as long as possible.

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    Making A Diagnosis For Canine Parkinsons Disease

    Youll need to be diligent about recording your dogs symptoms. Your vet will definitely be relying on your reports to see if their diagnosis is accurate. They will also test your dogs motor function by having them do certain physical exercises.

    They may also have full blood work and x-ray scans done to rule out any other potential ailments.

    Your vet may encourage that you get a second opinion too. Neurological diseases in dogs are somewhat difficult to diagnose.

    Diagnosis Of Parkinsons Disease

    Handwriting of a person who has a Parkinson’s disease

    A number of disorders can cause symptoms similar to those of Parkinson’s disease. People with Parkinson’s-like symptoms that result from other causes are sometimes said to have parkinsonism. While these disorders initially may be misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s, certain medical tests, as well as response to drug treatment, may help to distinguish them from Parkinson’s. Since many other diseases have similar features but require different treatments, it is important to make an exact diagnosis as soon as possible.

    There are currently no blood or laboratory tests to diagnose nongenetic cases of Parkinson’s disease. Diagnosis is based on a person’s medical history and a neurological examination. Improvement after initiating medication is another important hallmark of Parkinson’s disease.

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