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Does Parkinson’s Affect Your Mind



When People Talk About Parkinsons They May Mention The Effects It Has On The Substantia Nigra But Did You Know That There Are Other Areas Of The Brain That Are Affected By The Condition

How Effective Is CBD Oil for Parkinson

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Parkinson’s is a condition that causes the gradual loss of the dopamine-producing brain cells of the substantia nigra — an area of the brain located just above where the spinal cord meets the midbrain. It is these cells that produce and release the neurotransmitter dopamine, which has a key role in turning thought about movement into action.

While this definition of the condition is useful to briefly explain Parkinson’s, the whole story is somewhat more complex. Over the last 30 years, it has become accepted that Parkinson’s also causes a number of non-motor symptoms, such as changes in sleep, smell and even the way we think, which likely involve other areas of the brain.

Now scientists are looking at the broader effects of the condition on the brain in an attempt to better understand why people experience different symptoms. The finding could lead us to new treatments that tackle more than just the motor symptoms of the condition.

Have You Ever Thought How Challenging Drinking A Glass Of Water Can Be For Someone Suffering From Parkinsons Disease

On World Health Day, you’ll likely read about how healthy habits like exercising or drinking more water, can improve your health. While these are helpful tips and important topics to cover, we decided to take things a step further. What if you couldn’t drink that glass of water by yourself? It can be daunting to consider, but this scenario can become all-too-real for a person suffering from Parkinson’s disease. There are 10 million people in the world suffering from this disorder; which is why, today, we decided to share with you how Parkinson’s Disease can affect mobility and balance, and what can be done when the disorder is detected in its early stages. That is why raising awareness for this degenerative disease is important, and, while there is still much research to be done, we have high hopes that researchers will find a way to reduce the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, and eventually find a cure. This is becoming more and more urgent, given the fact that life expectancy is rising and the number of individuals with Parkinson’s disease will only increase in the future. But is there another solution in sight?

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Perspectives On Cognitive Impairment From People With Parkinsons Disease And Care Partners In The Working Group

Quotes from people with PD:

“Sometimes my brain ‘freezes up,’ kind of like my legs sometimes do. Finding the words I want to say is very hard, and my thoughts seem like they are blank.”

“I wish that the doctor had told me that cognitive changes could be one of the results of the disease. My clinic visits have focused much more on physical signs and symptoms. The few times cognition has been addressed, the comments were very brief.”

Quotes from PD care partners:

“The most bothersome is attention, which we call ‘chasing rabbits’ at our house. Early on this manifested as flitting from task to task without completion. However, cognitive symptoms have started to affect communication, which in turn affects our relationship. My husband’s frustration in turn sparks irritation in both of us. I sometimes wonder if the same is not occurring with friends, and they are too polite to tell me.”

“My husband has lost his initiative in social situations. He listens but rarely contributes and may get confused in the conversation. I miss the social interactions that we used to have with friends with little planning. With just a suggestion, it used to happen.”

Table 1 Questions for working group members

Want To Learn More About The Latest Research In Parkinsons Disease Ask Your Questions In Our Research Forum

Cognitive impairment can occur due to stress, particularly if the patient feels they are a burden to their caregiver, are experiencing a decline in daily functioning, have a worsening quality of life, are dealing with rising medical costs, or are concerned about their mortality.

According to the National Parkinson Foundation, some of the common cognitive issues people living with Parkinson’s disease face include:

  • Slowness of thinking
  • Struggling to find the right words in conversations
  • Declining visual perception
  • Lack of reasoning skills
  • Declining general intelligence

Some Parkinson’s disease medications can help with areas such as motivation and concentration, but there are no medications that can improve memory function.

MORE:How does Parkinson’s disease affect the brain?

Parkinsons’s News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Production Of Dopamine Neurons From Stem Cells: Could We Be One Step Closer To The Cure

Parkinson

As the disease progresses, people may experience reduced quality of life, if normal functions such as swallowing, start to be affected. Currently, there is no known cure for Parkinson’s disease. Once Parkinson’s is diagnosed, the symptoms can often be treated with medications and therapies, especially in the early stages. However, the scientific community is making every effort to find a way to cure or at the very least find more effective ways to lessen the symptoms of this physically impairing disease.

As we mentioned before, the disease primarily affects dopamine-producing brain cells or neurons. The good news is, scientists in Sweden have identified some insights and a set of markers that should help control the quality of stem cells engineered for clinical use to treat Parkinson’s disease. As the disease progresses and dopamine-producing brain cells malfunction and die, it leads to lower levels of dopamine, which is a chemical messenger essential for controlling movement. These findings should help fine-tune stem cell engineering to produce pure populations of high-quality dopamine neurons. Then, a pool of progenitor cells can be transplanted into the brains of patients, so they can make new supplies of dopamine cells.

But while this exciting new research is still in the lab, what else can we hope for to delay the symptoms of Parkinson’s and improve the quality of life of those suffering from the disease?

What Do People With Parkinsons Need To Bring With Them For Their Vaccine Appointment

Dr. Okun: Take your personal information and medication list. If you are prone to fainting, let the nurse know. For the second shot, bring the card issued to you on the first shot, so that the vaccine administration can be documented. Take a picture of the card once you have both shots so that you always have a copy.

What Other Conditions Have Similar Symptoms And Signs Of Parkinsons Disease

Other neurological diseases may cause symptoms similar to Parkinson’s disease. The term Parkinsonism refers to a patient that has symptoms similar to Parkinson’s.

Early in the disease process, it can be tough to make an assertive diagnosis and difference between Parkinson’s and Parkinson-like diseases.

Often the correct diagnosis is made after further symptoms develop, and the physician can monitor the course of the disease.

The development of additional symptoms and the course of the illness generally points towards the correct diagnosis. These are the most common neurological diseases that can produce Parkinson-like symptoms.

  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
  • Lewy Body disease or Dementia with Lewy bodies
  • Corticobasal degeneration or corticobasal ganglionic degeneration

Nonetheless, doctors should think of other causes rather than Parkinson’s disease when events like this happen.

  • Poor response to dopamine
  • Early loss of balance or vision problems
  • Prominent intellectual decline – dementia
  • Rapid onset or progression of the disease

Difficulties With Memory And Thinking May Develop In Some People With Parkinson’s

January 7, 2011

Dear Mayo Clinic:

Does Parkinson’s disease affect memory and thinking? My 70-year-old husband has this condition and is showing signs of cognitive impairment.

Answer:Unfortunately, Parkinson’s disease is not simply a problem of tremor, walking and movement. With advancing age, and the longer a person has the disease, difficulties with memory and thinking may surface. Typically, these problems are subtle at first, but may become progressively worse in some people with Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system that develops gradually over time. The development of cognitive problems reflects the progressive nature of the disease process. Early in the course of the disease, most symptoms — such as tremor, muscle rigidity and difficulty with movement — are usually mild and can often be effectively managed with medications.

After many years of Parkinson’s disease, though, symptoms may become less responsive to medication, and new problems can develop. New symptoms can include additional movement problems and cognitive difficulties, as well as bladder and bowel issues and, in some people, low blood pressure.

Physicians should also review patients’ drug lists, as medications for other health problems may sometimes compromise mental clarity. Finally, adequate sleep is important to sound thinking, and occasionally treating sleep disorders, such as sleep apnea, can improve cognition.

Researchers Trace Clues To The Disease’s Effects On Patients’ Mental Ability

Patients with Parkinson’s disease are known to exhibit slowed movements and tremors, but one aspect of their condition is often overlooked: cognitive impairment.

Unlike with Alzheimer’s and other dementias, patients with Parkinson’s don’t lose their memory. Instead, they may develop trouble with planning, making decisions and controlling their emotions, and often exhibit changes in personality as a result. About one-third to one-half of Parkinson’s sufferers exhibit some signs of cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, but over time virtually all patients will experience substantial cognitive decline.

With Alzheimer’s disease, the patient often stops recognizing family. “With Parkinson’s, it’s like the family doesn’t recognize anymore,” says Thomas Montine, a neuropathologist who heads the Parkinson’s disease research center at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Researchers like Dr. Montine and his colleagues at the university are investigating why the impairment occurs in hopes of better understanding the disease and improving current diagnostic and treatment methods.

Some 500,000 people in the U.S. are thought to have Parkinson’s and the numbers are expected to grow as the population gets older, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in Bethesda, Md. The disease begins on average around age 60 and the risk of Parkinson’s increases with age.

How Can We Reduce Mobility Constraints In People With Parkinsons Disease

Over the last few decades, neuroscience has been providing us with exciting new findings regarding the effects of physical exercise on neuroplasticity , neuroprotection and slowing of neural degeneration. In fact, it has been proven that physical exercise can improve brain function in people with neurological disorders.

Aerobic exercise, such as treadmill training and walking programs, have been tested on individuals with Parkinson’s Disease and has been shown to improve gait and quality of life in general. However, the type of exercise chosen should take into account a specific program provided by a specialist. The exercise shouldn’t, by any means, put the patient’s physical integrity at risk, especially if the patient is a senior. In order to address complex mobility issues in people with Parkinson’s Disease, a therapist could incorporate tasks such as balance training into the patient’s rehabilitation. These are exercises that challenge sensorimotor control of dynamic balance and gait to improve mobility.

According to a study by Dr. Ergun Y. Uc, of the University of Iowa, the results suggest that

“walking may provide a safe and easily accessible way of improving the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease and quality of life.”

One Of The Most Difficult Neurological Disorder Symptoms Of Parkinsons

Why might this be important to families challenged by PD? Because the biggest source of conflict in families occurs when loved ones fail to recognize that a person with brain changes is not the same person who existed at an earlier time in life. Human beings greatly value continuity in personality but by expecting the person to be the same as they once were, loved ones are unfair to the person with brain insult. This person could no more return to an earlier personality state than he or she can will away tremors or rigidity. Energy expended in any way other than coming to terms with this “new” person is fruitless. There is actually some fascinating research in this area and it is likely to be a topic for a great deal more discussion in future blogs.

Because of the greater likelihood for executive dysfunction and dementia, personality change is easier to see among individuals with more advanced PD. Motivation is frequently affected, resulting in apathy that diminishes how actively an individual interacts with other people and with the world . Thinking or cognition changes can cause the person to process information more slowly and with less focus and concentration . A previously methodical, consistent individual often becomes increasingly chaotic in their response to their environment . One easily becomes less interested and hopeful about the future .

Conversations From People With Parkinsons About Their Mental Health

Recently, I talked about mental health with two thoughtful people who are living with PD, to get their perspectives on the issues that they deal with and the strategies that work for them. Their approaches are by no means the only ones. There are as many different ways to maximize your mental health as there are people with PD. But hearing how other people deal with their challenges can help you craft ways to deal with yours.

How Can Parkinsons Disease Affect Mobility And Sense Of Balance

The neurophysiology of Parkinson’s Disease proves that it affects balance, gait, movement and can actually cause constraints on mobility. But what do we mean by mobility?

Mobility is a person’s ability to move safely in a variety of environments in order to accomplish functional tasks.

Functional tasks like drinking a glass of water or eating can become a problem. And if we think about it, mobility is something we take for granted most of the time. We don’t expect to lose it, and we don’t expect to get a degenerative disease, such as Parkinson’s. Therefore, being able to maintain good mobility is something of utmost importance as we age, and we must take preventive measures to delay mobility impairment as much as possible.

Mobility requires dynamic neural control, a sense of balance, and enough agility to be able to adapt to postural transitions as quickly as possible. What also concerns us today is the several types of mobility deficits caused by the progression of Parkinson’s Disease. We need to understand what preventive exercises and preventative measures can be taken to minimize the risk of falls and injury.

Parkinson’s Disease and fall prevention

While Parkinson’s is not life-threatening, people may experience life-threatening complications, such as choking on food or falling over. We must help our elderly loved ones prevent falls at any cost so that suggested exercise programs can work effectively in combatting the effects of Parkinson’s Disease.

What Is The Main Cause Of Death In Parkinsons Disease Patients

8 Ways Parkinson’s Disease Affects Your Movement

Parkinson’s is often referred to as a “bespoke” disease because it affects each patient differently. Another factor worth considering is that Parkinson’s disease generally affects people in their 60s, most of whom die of unrelated conditions such as cancer, heart disease or stroke. However, the most common cause of death in those with Parkinson’s disease is pneumonia. This is because the disease can impair your ability to swallow in the later stages, putting you at risk for aspirating food or liquid into the lungs.

Know The Causes Symptoms And Treatment Of This Nerve Disorder

Parkinson’s disease, a chronic and progressive nerve disorder, affects as many as one million Americans, with 60,000 people diagnosed each year. You might have questions like: What is Parkinson’s disease? Who gets it, what are the symptoms, and is there a cure? Here’s what you need to know.

Who Is At Risk?

Age is one of the biggest risk factors for Parkinson’s. The disease develops most often after age 60 and occurs more often in men than in women. Early-onset Parkinson’s can strike people under age 50. In very rare cases, symptoms may even appear at age 20 or younger. 

Causes

What Lifestyle Changes Can I Make To Ease Parkinsons Symptoms

Improve the quality of your sleep.

Is Parkinsons Disease Fatal Life Expectancy For ParkinsonsEmma-Marie Smith

What Are The Mental And Physical Effects Of Parkinsons Disease

Parkinson’s disease  is a disease that affects the way the bodies substantia nigra, also known as the dopamine in the brain and nerves, communicates with the brain and nervous system. When the chemical messenger is not doing its job properly, an individual starts to feel the impacts of Parkinson’s on their body and their psyche. When an individual has Parkinson’s, he or she will experience various side effects and symptoms from the disease that will impact their quality of life and their every day routines.

 

What Lifestyle Changes Can I Make To Ease Parkinsons Symptoms

Exercise: Exercise helps improve muscle strength, balance, coordination, flexibility, and tremor. It is also strongly believed to improve memory, thinking and reduce the risk of falls and decrease anxiety and depression. One study in persons with Parkinson’s disease showed that 2.5 hours of exercise per week resulted in improved ability to move and a slower decline in quality of life compared to those who didn’t exercise or didn’t start until later in the course of their disease. Some exercises to consider include strengthening or resistance training, stretching exercises or aerobics . All types of exercise are helpful.

Eat a healthy, balanced diet: This is not only good for your general health but can ease some of the non-movement related symptoms of Parkinson’s, such as constipation. Eating foods high in fiber in particular can relieve constipation. The Mediterranean diet is one example of a healthy diet.

Preventing falls and maintaining balance: Falls are a frequent complication of Parkinson’s. While you can do many things to reduce your risk of falling, the two most important are: 1) to work with your doctor to ensure that your treatments — whether medicines or deep brain stimulation — are optimal; and 2) to consult with a physical therapist who can assess your walking and balance. The physical therapist is the expert when it comes to recommending assistive devices or exercise to improve safety and preventing falls.

Improve the quality of your sleep.

Kathy: On Anxiety Going It Alone And Being Kind To Yourself

Anxiety is also the biggest mental health challenge for Kathy , a 72 year old woman with PD diagnosed 4 years ago. Her mental health concerns are deeply influenced by a major external stressor, namely an adult child who is facing an illness of her own. Kathy was always a very active and capable person, and remains so, but PD is starting to cause some physical limitations for her. She wants to help her daughter as much as she can, but has begun to realize that she can’t do everything she used to be able to do. This is extremely frustrating, because not only must she accept her limitations, but others around her must do so as well.

She often feels very lonely. She is not married and finds herself shouldering her own physical and mental struggles, as well as those of her daughter, by herself. She is lucky to have some close friends, but they have health challenges of their own to deal with and can’t always be there for her. She finds it mildly exasperating to constantly read how important it is for PD patients to surround themselves with supportive family – what if you are alone?

She also finds it irritating to read articles about PD that are relentlessly “perky” about PD. Yes, exercise can be very helpful and can sometimes help keep symptoms at bay. But “there is a down-side to PD as well. You should be allowed to feel that and express that”. It is also not your fault if your PD worsens – it does not mean that you did not do enough.

Parkinson’s Disease Brain Vs Normal Brain: What’s Different

It’s not yet possible to spot the difference between a brain with Parkinson’s and a normal, “healthy” brain on an MRI scan. However, since Lewy bodies were first found in the substantia nigra in 1927, doctors have known they are a feature of Parkinson’s disease. The presence of these Lewy bodies is thought to be what separates people with Parkinson’s disease from the general population. However, Lewy bodies can only be diagnosed with certainty during a brain autopsy after death.

Do People With Parkinsons Get Priority Access To The Covid

Each state has its own process for rolling out the vaccine to different population groups. If you would like to advocate for people with Parkinson’s to be part of a priority group, we encourage you to contact your elected officials. We have created a letter that you can personalize and send them either by mail or electronically. 

How Can Falls Resulting From Parkinsons Disease Be Fatal

Patients with Parkinson’s disease are seen to be at an increased risk of bad falls which can lead to death. Generally it is seen that death results from hip fractures that require hospitalization because surgery would be required. Hip surgery is a major operation which carries the risk of infection, heart failure and blood clots. Such clots become dangerous if they reach the lungs. Sometimes fall may even lead to fatal brain injuries if not taken care properly.

Janet Reno’s Death: How Does A Person Die Of Parkinson’s

Former U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno has died at age 78 from complications of Parkinson’s disease, her family announced today. But how do people die from this disease?

In patients with Parkinson’s disease, the brain cells that produce a chemical called dopamine start to die off. It’s not clear what triggers the death of these cells, but researchers do know that dopamine is important for the control of muscle movement. Parkinson’s patients experience symptoms such as tremors, slowed movements, muscle stiffness and impaired balance.

Parkinsons Disease Brain Vs Normal Brain: Whats Different

It’s not yet possible to spot the difference between a brain with Parkinson’s and a normal, “healthy” brain on an MRI scan. However, since Lewy bodies were first found in the substantia nigra in 1927, doctors have known they are a feature of Parkinson’s disease. The presence of these Lewy bodies is thought to be what separates people with Parkinson’s disease from the general population. However, Lewy bodies can only be diagnosed with certainty during a brain autopsy after death.

The Preponderance Of Injury In The Past Of People With Pd

Complications Related To Parkinson’s Can Affect SurvivalClaudia Chaves, MD

Claudia Chaves, MD, is board-certified in cerebrovascular disease and neurology with a subspecialty certification in vascular neurology.

Parkinson’s is a common neurodegenerative disease, and although it is not fatal, research suggests it may influence life expectancy.

A 2012 study in Archives of Neurology examined the six-year survival of nearly 140,000 Medicare beneficiaries with Parkinson’s disease in the United States. During the six-year period, 64% of the participants with Parkinson’s disease passed away.

The risk of death of those with Parkinson’s was then compared to Medicare beneficiaries who did not have Parkinson’s or any other common diseases, including:

What Are The Surgical Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons Disease And Low Blood Pressure Whats The Link

Low blood pressure is one of the most common non-motor signs of Parkinson’s disease that affects one in 5 people with the disease . Although the problem can appear at any stage, people with mid and late-stage of Parkinson’s disease are generally more affected.

For most patients, drop in the blood pressure happens early in the morning or after taking medication. For others, it can occur at any time of the day.

Research shows that lower blood pressure appears many years before the development of motor symptoms . Therefore, it is now being considered as one of the development.

Physical Exercise Programs: Can They Help Cognition In Pd

Back Conditions

Studies in healthy older adults suggest that physical exercise improves cognitive function. A meta-analysis of 29 randomized controlled trials including 2049 participants revealed statistically significant, but clinically modest, improvements in attention, processing speed, executive function, and memory following 6 weeks to 18 months of aerobic exercise .60 In older adults at risk for cognitive decline, significant improvements in global cognition occurred with at least 150?min of moderate-intensity physical activity per week over 6 months, with benefits persisting after 18 months.61 However, among sedentary older adults in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study, a 24-month moderate-intensity exercise program compared to a health education program did not improve global or domain-specific cognitive function. Participants in the physical activity group who were 80 years or older or had worse baseline physical performance, however, had greater changes in executive function composite scores compared to the health education group.62

Nutritional Interventions: Can They Help Cognition In Pd

Good nutrition is essential for living well in general and with PD, not only playing a role in optimizing general health and motor strength but also potentially cognitive function. The relationship between nutrition and cognition is an area of growing interest to the PD community. In a large cross-sectional survey conducted by the Parkinson Alliance , 93% of participants reported that they believed that diet/nutrition was important in managing their PD symptoms.87 Yet, only 11% of participants reported that a healthcare professional offered specific dietary recommendations to them. The majority of participants who followed a specific diet “designed” their meal plans based on information obtained from self-help resources , family, and friends. Moreover, while 63% of respondents perceived themselves as eating a “healthy” diet most of the time, there is a lack of consensus as to what comprises a healthy diet for people with PD. Discussions regarding nutrition in PD have typically focused on topics such as protein and medication absorption, weight loss, dysphagia, and gastrointestinal issues. However, there are growing investigations of nutrients that may be associated with increased or decreased risk of PD. Increased consumption of dairy products88 and lower serum urate levels may be risk factors for PD,89 whereas high intake of fruits, vegetables, and fish or use of nicotine and caffeine may confer a lower risk of PD.90,91

Complications Related To Parkinsons Can Affect Survival

Claudia Chaves, MD

Claudia Chaves, MD, is board-certified in cerebrovascular disease and neurology with a subspecialty certification in vascular neurology.

Parkinson’s is a common neurodegenerative disease, and although it is not fatal, research suggests it may influence life expectancy.

A 2012 study in Archives of Neurology examined the six-year survival of nearly 140,000 Medicare beneficiaries with Parkinson’s disease in the United States. During the six-year period, 64% of the participants with Parkinson’s disease passed away.

The risk of death of those with Parkinson’s was then compared to Medicare beneficiaries who did not have Parkinson’s or any other common diseases, including:

When controlling for variables like age, race, and gender, the six-year risk of death among people with Parkinson’s was found to be nearly four times greater than those Medicare beneficiaries without the disease or other common diseases.

At the same time, the rate of death among those with Parkinson’s disease was similar to those with hip fracture, Alzheimer’s dementia, or a recent heart attack—although it was higher than those who had been newly diagnosed with either colorectal cancer, stroke, ischemic heart disease, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

What Are The Surgical Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

What Is The Outlook For Persons With Parkinsons Disease

The future is hopeful. Some of the research underway includes:

What Are The Surgical Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

Most patients with Parkinson’s disease can maintain a good quality of life with medications. However, as the disease worsens, medications may no longer be effective in some patients. In these patients, the effectiveness of medications becomes unpredictable – reducing symptoms during “on” periods and no longer controlling symptoms during “off” periods, which usually occur when the medication is wearing off and just before the next dose is to be taken. Sometimes these variations can be managed with changes in medications. However, sometimes they can’t. Based on the type and severity of your symptoms, the failure of adjustments in your medications, the decline in your quality of life and your overall health, your doctor may discuss some of the available surgical options.

What Is The Outlook For Persons With Parkinsons Disease

Although there is no cure or absolute evidence of ways to prevent Parkinson’s disease, scientists are working hard to learn more about the disease and find innovative ways to better manage it, prevent it from progressing and ultimately curing it.

Currently, you and your healthcare team’s efforts are focused on medical management of your symptoms along with general health and lifestyle improvement recommendations . By identifying individual symptoms and adjusting the course of action based on changes in symptoms, most people with Parkinson’s disease can live fulfilling lives.

The future is hopeful. Some of the research underway includes:

  • Using stem cells to produce new neurons, which would produce dopamine.
  • Producing a dopamine-producing enzyme that is delivered to a gene in the brain that controls movement.
  • Using a naturally occurring human protein – glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, GDNF – to protect dopamine-releasing nerve cells.

Many other investigations are underway too. Much has been learned, much progress has been made and additional discoveries are likely to come.

Myth 6: Deep Brain Stimulation Is Experimental Therapy

Fact: Deep brain stimulation, or DBS, is a procedure in which doctors place electrodes in the brain at the point when medications are less effective in masking motor symptoms, such as tremor, stiffness and slowness of movement.

While it may sound frightening and futuristic, it’s been around and successfully used for decades. DBS works very similarly to a pacemaker, except the wire is in the brain, not in the heart. It’s been a standard procedure for the past two decades.

What Medications Are Used To Treat Parkinsons Disease

Medications are the main treatment method for patients with Parkinson’s disease. Your doctor will work closely with you to develop a treatment plan best suited for you based on the severity of your disease at the time of diagnosis, side effects of the drug class and success or failure of symptom control of the medications you try.

Medications combat Parkinson’s disease by:

  • Helping nerve cells in the brain make dopamine.
  • Mimicking the effects of dopamine in the brain.
  • Blocking an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain.
  • Reducing some specific symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

How To Take Care Of Patients With Parkinsons Disease

The condition of Parkinson’s disease progress with time and demands care from a care giver. The disease affects the motor abilities of the patient and the gradual loss of independence can be disheartening. Care givers should-

Emotional Support: Try maintaining the quality of life of the patient with proper mental support.


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