Thursday, June 16, 2022
Thursday, June 16, 2022
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Do I Have Parkinson’s

Diagnosis Of Parkinsons Disease

What are the important things to know if I have Parkinson’s Disease?

A number of disorders can cause symptoms similar to those of Parkinson’s disease. People with Parkinson’s-like symptoms that result from other causes are sometimes said to have parkinsonism. While these disorders initially may be misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s, certain medical tests, as well as response to drug treatment, may help to distinguish them from Parkinson’s. Since many other diseases have similar features but require different treatments, it is important to make an exact diagnosis as soon as possible.

There are currently no blood or laboratory tests to diagnose nongenetic cases of Parkinson’s disease. Diagnosis is based on a person’s medical history and a neurological examination. Improvement after initiating medication is another important hallmark of Parkinson’s disease.

Who Gets Parkinson’s Disease

About 1 million people in the United States have Parkinson’s disease, and both men and women can get it. Symptoms usually appear when someone is older than 50 and it becomes more common as people get older.

Many people wonder if you’re more likely to get Parkinson’s disease if you have a relative who has it. Although the role that heredity plays isn’t completely understood, we do know that if a close relative like a parent, brother, or sister has Parkinson’s, there is a greater chance of developing the disease. But Parkinson’s disease is not contagious. You can’t get it by simply being around someone who has it.

What Are The Primary Motor Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

There are four primary motor symptoms of Parkinsons disease: tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural instability . Observing two or more of these symptoms is the main way that physicians diagnose Parkinsons.

It is important to know that not all of these symptoms must be present for a diagnosis of Parkinsons disease to be considered. In fact, younger people may only notice one or two of these motor symptoms, especially in the early stages of the disease. Not everyone with Parkinsons disease has a tremor, nor is a tremor proof of Parkinsons. If you suspect Parkinsons, see a neurologist or movement disorders specialist.

Tremors

Rigidity

Bradykinesia

Postural Instability

Walking or Gait Difficulties

Dystonia

Vocal Symptoms

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Who Are More Likely To Develop Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease affects both men and women, though about 50% more men are affected than women. The reasons for this are unclear but there are theories that estrogen may cause women to develop the disease less frequently, and when they do, they seem to get a milder form of it. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke estimates about 50,000 people are diagnosed with PD each year in the U.S. However, this number may be higher due to the fact that many people in the early stages of PD assume their symptoms are due to aging and do not seek medical attention. Complicating the diagnosis is that symptoms of Parkinson’s resemble other diseases and there is no one definitive test to diagnose it.

Apda In Your Community

One Surprising Thing You Should Know About Parkinson

APDAUncategorizedUnderstanding Weakness in Parkinsons disease

It is common for Parkinsons Disease patients to feel weak. They frequently describe their legs as feeling, like theyre made out of lead,like theyre in concrete. But they will also feel weak all over, or describe weakness in their hands or arms. In fact, when Parkinsons Disease patients are tested for strength they are normal but they do fatigue easier. That is, with repeated muscle contractions they do lose force, so it is more difficult for a Parkinsons Disease patient to do repetitive tasks.

When patients think about weakness in Parkinsons Disease they should recall that the original name for this disease was, The Shaking Palsy.Shaking refers to the tremor, of course, but palsy means weakness. James Parkinson called his monograph on the disease, The Shaking Palsy. Thus Parkinson, himself, called this disorder weakness and tremor, but substituted the technical terminology of his day. The coding book used for billing insurance companies calls Parkinsons Disease Paralysis agitans, meaning paralysis with tremor .

Although patients feel the weakness in their limbs, the problem is in the brain. Studies have shown that the actual, objectively measurable muscle weakness that occurs with repeated tasks improves with treatment of the dopamine deficit in the brain with Parkinsons Disease medications.

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Determine Projects Value And Importance

If you want someone to be efficient , they need to be aware of the projects value and importance. Its hard to be motivated to finish a project with no particular significance.

So, always paint a bigger picture. Explain not only how the current task helps with reaching a bigger goal, but also what will come next. Sometimes, people procrastinate because they dont know what to do after they finish what theyre working on at the moment. Because of that, there should be a schedule and a plan for the project.

What Medications Are Used To Treat Parkinsons Disease

Medications are the main treatment method for patients with Parkinsons disease. Your doctor will work closely with you to develop a treatment plan best suited for you based on the severity of your disease at the time of diagnosis, side effects of the drug class and success or failure of symptom control of the medications you try.

Medications combat Parkinsons disease by:

  • Helping nerve cells in the brain make dopamine.
  • Mimicking the effects of dopamine in the brain.
  • Blocking an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain.
  • Reducing some specific symptoms of Parkinsons disease.

Levodopa: Levodopa is a main treatment for the slowness of movement, tremor, and stiffness symptoms of Parkinsons disease. Nerve cells use levodopa to make dopamine, which replenishes the low amount found in the brain of persons with Parkinsons disease. Levodopa is usually taken with carbidopa to allow more levodopa to reach the brain and to prevent or reduce the nausea and vomiting, low blood pressure and other side effects of levodopa. Sinemet® is available in an immediate release formula and a long-acting, controlled release formula. Rytary® is a newer version of levodopa/carbidopa that is a longer-acting capsule. The newest addition is Inbrija®, which is inhaled levodopa. It is used by people already taking regular carbidopa/levodopa for when they have off episodes .

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Tremor In Other Conditions

While tremor is a common symptom of Parkinsons, it can also be a symptom of other conditions, most notably essential tremor. The main difference between Parkinsons tremor and most other types of tremor is that in Parkinsons resting tremor is most common. Other conditions are usually characterized by action tremor, which tends to lessen at rest and increase when youre doing something, like trying to make a phone call or take a drink.

Tremors of the head and voice are also common in essential tremor but rare in Parkinsons.

Changes In Sleeping Patterns

How much should I eat with Parkinsons?

As Parkinsons progresses, you can also develop problems with sleep patterns. These may not happen in the early stages, but can be noticeable later. You might wake up often in the middle of the night or sleep more during the day than you do at night.

Another common sleep disturbance for people with Parkinsons is rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder. This is when you start acting out your dreams in your sleep, such as verbally and physically, which can get uncomfortable if someone is sharing your bed. Dr. Rundle-Gonzalez says many times a bed partner will be the one to notice sleep problems.

REM sleep behavior disorder can also happen in people who dont have Parkinsons. However, if this isnt something youve dealt with before, its likely related to your disease. There are medications your doctor can prescribe to help you sleep comfortably through the night.

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Stooping Or Hunching Over

Are you not standing up as straight as you used to? If you or your family or friends notice that you seem to be stooping, leaning or slouching when you stand, it could be a sign of Parkinson’s disease .

What is normal?If you have pain from an injury or if you are sick, it might cause you to stand crookedly. Also, a problem with your bones can make you hunch over.

What If You Have Parkinson’s

After Parkinson’s is diagnosed, your doctor will help you develop an individualized plan to address the symptoms that have the biggest impact on your everyday life and help slow down the progression of the disease. The first step is getting a referral to a neurologist for expert care especially one who is trained in movement disorders.

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What Are The Surgical Treatments For Parkinsons Disease

Most patients with Parkinsons disease can maintain a good quality of life with medications. However, as the disease worsens, medications may no longer be effective in some patients. In these patients, the effectiveness of medications becomes unpredictable reducing symptoms during on periods and no longer controlling symptoms during off periods, which usually occur when the medication is wearing off and just before the next dose is to be taken. Sometimes these variations can be managed with changes in medications. However, sometimes they cant. Based on the type and severity of your symptoms, the failure of adjustments in your medications, the decline in your quality of life and your overall health, your doctor may discuss some of the available surgical options.

Its Time To Redefine Early Stage Parkinsons

Our plan to cure Parkinson

The Parkinsons Foundation has shared 10 early signs of PD, including tremor, small handwriting, and loss of smell.

While younger people with early-onset PD may have some of the same signs and symptoms as older individuals, the onset may look different, so their issues may not be attributed to PD.

The American Parkinson Disease Association notes that, Because the majority of people who get Parkinsons disease are over the age of 60, the disease is often overlooked in younger people, leading many to go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed for extended periods of time.

My sister was finally referred to a neurologist at the Cleveland Clinic Center for Neurological Restoration in Ohio, as her symptoms slowly but consistently progressed. After multiple tests, including an MRI, cognitive testing, and a movement and balance analysis, she was diagnosed with PD.

One of Bevs early signs was weakness in her left hand, which she attributed to carpal tunnel syndrome. She regularly conducted echocardiograms and electrocardiograms, which required a lot of constant hand movement. She did not have stiffness or balance issues initially, but she did have a slight head tremor.

As Bevs PD progressed, she noticed that her writing was changing. She now has stage 3 PD and said, Sometimes I cant read my own writing. I feel like it looks like chicken scratch!

Bev also has cognitive issues, mostly related to her short-term memory.

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Drug Therapy And Research

If the disease progresses beyond minor symptoms, drug treatment may be indicated. Drug therapy for Parkinsonâs typically provides relief for 10â15 years or more. The most commonly prescribed medication is L-dopa , and this helps replenish some of the depleted dopamine in the brain. Sinemet, a combination of levodopa and carbidopa, is the drug most doctors use to treat Parkinsonâs disease. Recent clinical studies have suggested, in the younger person, the class of drugs called âdopamine agonistsâ should be used prior to levodopa-carpidopa except in patients with cognitive problems or hallucinations. In those older than 75, dopamine agonists should be used cautiously because of an added risk of hallucinations.

Other drugs are also used, and new drugs are continually being tested. It is common for multiple drugs to be prescribed because many of them work well together to control symptoms and reduce side effects. Contrary to past beliefs, starting Sinemet in newly diagnosed people does not lead to early symptoms of dyskinesia . Current knowledge is that the disease progression causes dyskinesias, not a âresistanceâ to the drug.

Quality of life studies show that early treatment with dopaminergic medications improves daily functioning, prevents falls, and improves a personâs sense of well-being.

What Is An Example Of Parkinsons Law

In his work, Parkinson gave an example of an old lady who spends the whole day writing a postcard to her niece. He wrote: An hour will be spent in finding the postcard, another in hunting for spectacles, half-an-hour in a search for the address, an hour and a quarter in composition, and twenty minutes in deciding whether or not to take an umbrella when going to the pillar-box in the next street. In short, it took her the whole day to do a simple activity that a busy person would finish in a couple of minutes.

Another common example is a student who procrastinates and then crams everything in 2 days and 2 nights before the exam.

Theres even a phenomenon called the Student Syndrome, where people delay doing the task until right before the deadline. Its believed that the term was introduced by Eliyahu M. Goldratt in his novel Critical Chain; he drew a parallel between students who wait until the last minute to study and employees who do the same with their project tasks because they think they have enough time to do everything.

As the Stock-Stanford Corollary to Parkinsons law states, If you wait until last minute, it only takes a minute to do.

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Why Is Expert Care Important

Early expert care can help reduce PD complications. Findings show that 60 percent of people with Parkinson’s fall short of getting the expert care they need. The National Parkinson Foundation has estimated that about 6,400 people with Parkinson’s die;unnecessarily;;each year due to poor care.

Trained neurologists will help you recognize, treat and manage the disease. Common approaches include medication, surgical treatment, lifestyle modifications , physical therapy, support groups, occupational therapy and speech therapy. The best approach is interdisciplinary care, where you are seen by multiple specialists on a regular basis and all of the specialists talk and arrange the best possible coordinated care. This is what is referred to as a patient-centric approach to Parkinson’s care.

Parkinson’s Disease Is Only Seen In People Of Advanced Age

Why Do I Have Parkinson’s? – Tremors stop during visit

Parkinson’s disease isn’t just seen in people of advanced age. While it does tend to affect people over age 60 more often, in about 5% to 10% of cases, “early onset” PD can begin in people as young as age 40. The progression of PD is different for everyone, however, those who develop it at earlier ages seem to have a more severe progression. Life expectancy for people with Parkinson’s disease is about the same as the average population, but complications from the disease in the later stages can lead to fatal outcomes from choking, pneumonia, and falling.

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What Is The Treatment For Parkinson’s Disease

    There is currently no treatment to cure Parkinson’s disease. Several therapies are available to delay the onset of motor symptoms and to ameliorate motor symptoms. All of these therapies are designed to increase the amount of dopamine in the brain either by replacing dopamine, mimicking dopamine, or prolonging the effect of dopamine by inhibiting its breakdown. Studies have shown that early therapy in the non-motor stage can delay the onset of motor symptoms, thereby extending quality of life.

    The most effective therapy for Parkinson’s disease is levodopa , which is converted to dopamine in the brain. However, because long-term treatment with levodopa can lead to unpleasant side effects , its use is often delayed until motor impairment is more severe. Levodopa is frequently prescribed together with carbidopa , which prevents levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. Co-treatment with carbidopa allows for a lower levodopa dose, thereby reducing side effects.

    In earlier stages of Parkinson’s disease, substances that mimic the action of dopamine , and substances that reduce the breakdown of dopamine inhibitors) can be very efficacious in relieving motor symptoms. Unpleasant side effects of these preparations are quite common, including swelling caused by fluid accumulation in body tissues, drowsiness, constipation, dizziness, hallucinations, and nausea.

    How Is Daytime Sleepiness Treated

    Consider making certain lifestyle modifications, such as:

    • Establish good sleep hygiene, including a set bedtime and wake-up time.
    • Get exposure to adequate light during the day and darkness at night.
    • Remember indoor lighting may not be sufficient to promote a normal circadian rhythm.
    • Avoid sedentary activities during the day.
    • Participate in activities outside the home. They may help provide stimulation to prevent daytime dozing.
    • Get physical exercise appropriate to your level of functioning, which may also promote daytime wakefulness. Strenuous exercise, however, should be avoided six hours before sleep.
    • Do NOT drive while sleepy if you experience excessive daytime sleepiness. Motor vehicle accidents increase during periods of drowsiness and may be associated with sudden onset of sleep .
    • Talk to your doctor about possibly decreasing the dosage of dopamine agonists if you experience daytime sleepiness or sleep attacks.
    • Talk to your doctor about decreasing stimulants like caffeine, modafinil and methylphenidate .

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    Tips For Better Sleep

    • Keep a regular sleep schedule go to bed at the same time and get up at the same time.
    • Choose your bedtime based on when you want to get up. Plan to spend seven to eight hours a night in bed.
    • Make a bedtime routine for example, snack, bath, tooth-brushing, toileting and follow it every evening.
    • Spend time outdoors and exercise every day, in the morning if possible. Avoid exercise after 8:00 p.m.
    • If you cant get outdoors, consider light therapy sitting or working near a light therapy box, available at drug stores and department stores.
    • If you nap, try to do so at the same time every day, for no more than an hour, and not after 3:00 p.m.
    • Sleep in a cool dark place and use the bed only for sleeping and sexual activity.
    • Do not read or watch television in bed.
    • Use satin sheets and pajamas to make moving in bed easier.
    • Minimize drinking liquids for three hours before bedtime to avoid frequent nighttime urination.
    • Go to the bathroom immediately before retiring.
    • Place a commode next to the bed, to minimize the effort, and light to get up during the night.
    • Avoid:
    • Alcohol, caffeine and other stimulants such as nicotine
    • Heavy late-night meals
    • Heavy exercise within six hours of bedtime
    • Thoughts or discussions before bedtime about topics that cause anxiety, anger or frustration
    • Clock watching
    • Screen time television, phones, tablets one or two hours before bed.

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