Thursday, September 22, 2022
Thursday, September 22, 2022
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Seated Exercises For Parkinson’s Patients

About Dr Sarah King Pt Dpt

Parkinson Seated Exercise

Sarah is a passionate Parkinsons advocate who founded Invigorate Physical Therapy & Wellness, an online wellness practice 100% specialized in Parkinsons disease, to help her clients get out of overwhelm and into action by connecting them with the tools and support they need to thrive over the course of their Parkinsons journey. She lives in Austin, Texas with her husband , Matt.

Download the PDFs from this Parkinsons Core Strength Exercise Mini-Series for free here.

Brian Grant Foundation Exercise Videos

Cost: Free

Cost: Free for 9 videos $29/month or $290/year for online streaming

The nine free classes include boxing fundamentals, HIIT , chair fit, tai chi, core, yoga, stretching/mobility. The free classes are 13 to 30 minutes. Classes are led by a physical therapist with Parkinsons specific certifications.

Paid classes incorporate PWR! Moves, cognitive dual task training, balance training, intensity training, and flexibility. For subscribers, new 20-25 minute videos are released weekly.

Cost: Free

Dance exercise class videos on YouTube. Each is fewer than 10 minutes long. Nearly 30 videos as of October 28, 2020.

Rachelle was featured at the Davis Phinney Foundation Victory Summit Albany in October, 2020. Watch an interview with Rachelle here, and Rachelle’s 25 minute Dance Beyond Parkinson’s Summit presentation here.

Cost: Free

Six seated dance exercise class videos on YouTube. Each is about one hour long. All are with the same instructor.

Cost: Free for 16 videos $50 for 100+ videos

Sixteen archived exercise classes are available for free viewing. Classes are designed to increase coordination, balance, flexibility, and strength through music and movement from a broad range of dance styles. 100+ archived classes and additional benefits are available for a $50 membership.

Try Seated Exercises If You Have Limited Mobility

Performing strength and flexibility exercises while sitting can help you stay fit and improve your range of motion all with minimal stress and wear and tear on your muscles and joints.

An example of a seated stretching routine recommended by the Parkinsons Foundation is the hamstring stretch. To do this stretch:

  • Sit tall in a chair and place one leg straight out on another chair.
  • Keep your toes pointed upward, your knee flat, and your back straight.
  • Gently reach for your toes with both arms.
  • Only reach as far forward as you can without bending your knee and without feeling strain.
  • Switch legs and repeat.
  • An example of a strength exercise you can perform while sitting down is the shoulder blade squeeze. To perform this exercise:

  • Sit with your back straight and your buttocks forward on the edge of a chair.
  • Open your arms out to the sides, with your fingers spread.
  • Pull your arms back and squeeze shoulder blades together.
  • Your physical therapist can recommend additional seated exercises.

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    Exercise 4 : Pwr Step* Kneeling

    STARTING POSITION: Kneeling in front of a chair.

  • Kneeling in front of a sturdy chair, stack your hips on top of your knees and shoulders on top of your hips. Gaze forward and place your hands on the chair for balance. Slightly squeeze your hips and pull your shoulders back.
  • Shift your weight to into your right knee and powerfully step your left leg to the side of the chair. Keep an upright posture.
  • Once you find your balance, open your arms out to your sides, squeezing your shoulders back and pressing your hips forward. Keep your fingers spread wide.
  • Return to the starting position.Repeat on the other side.Repeat 10 times per side.Rest and perform a second round.

    Parkinson Society British Columbia Exercise Recordings

    Seated Exercises for Patients With Parkinsons Disease

    Cost: Free

    Purchase Info:

    Cost: Free

    Features thirteen men and women with PD of different ages demonstrating both standard and advanced workout routines with twice-weekly variations. Intro reviews benefits of exercise and keys to success. Exercises were developed by physical therapist expert.

    Cost: Free

    Archived classes from March 2020 to the present include yoga, shadow boxing, multi-tasking/cognition, strength and coordination cardio, bigger and stronger.

    Cost: Free

    Four of the videos posted to the PASF YouTube channel are exercise videos. Each is 25 minutes long. Focus of the videos include strength and mobility, balance skills, seated and mat exercises.

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    Live Large With Parkinson’s At The Countryside Y

    Cost: Free

    These two 25-minute exercise classes are designed for people with Parkinson’s. The exercises may be done seated or standing, supported by a chair. These videos were created in March/April 2020.

    Purchase Info: www.lsvtglobal.com or email

    Cost: $28 for DVD or download $15/year streaming

    Videos are designed for people with PD to use as an adjunct to LSVT BIG treatment delivered by an LSVT BIG certified clinician. The videos can also be used during the month of therapy and after therapy as a motivation to practice and keep moving. Volume 1 contains standard exercises while standing. Volume 2 contains exercises adapted to seated and supine positions, plus a chapter for caregivers. Available in English, German and Japanese.

    Purchase Info: Ohana Pacific Rehab Services, 808-262-1118, online

    Cost: $24.50 for DVD $19.50 for book $40 for DVD and book

    This program focuses on exercises, flexibility, and pragmatic solutions for walking, moving, falling, and getting up off the floor. Adaptive equipment is reviewed. Demonstrators have PD. Three levels of exercise shown. Designed by a physical therapist.

    How Does Exercise Change The Brain

    What happens in the brain to produce these benefits? A study conducted by Beth Fisher and her team at the University of Southern California found that on a day-to-day basis, people with PD who exercised moved more normally than those who did not.

    The study also found that in looking at mice that had exercised under conditions parallel to a human treadmill:

  • Exercising did not affect the amount of dopamine in the brain, but the mice that exercised the brain cells were using dopamine more efficiently and their dopamine signals lasted longer.
  • Exercise improves efficiency by modifying the areas of the brain where dopamine signals are received the substantia nigra and basal ganglia.
  • Based on these findings, the research team believes exercise may help the brain maintain old connections, form new ones and restore lost ones. In certain situations, the neuroplasticity created from exercise in people with PD may outweigh the effects of neurodegeneration.

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    Every Day You Should Be Aiming To:

    Learn something new

    That could be reading various newspapers, listening to radio shows, listening to audio books, or joining a book club. Also investigate the various memory training puzzles that are available.

    Challenge yourself

    Volunteer, perhaps with a Parkinsons NSW Support Group or community service organisation, or even in a knitting or sewing group. Make sure you go out each day, even if you feel a little unsteady on your feet. By using a cane or walker, you will gain greater confidence.

    Practice writing by making big sweeping movements

    A pen grip may help with control and make it easier to grasp your pen lightly and decrease the force required to move it across the page.

    Exercise your voice

    The Basic Elements Of Exercising With Parkinsons

    Daily Seated Parkinsons Exercises

    There are four core elements of exercise that are important for people with PD:

  • Aerobic e.g. brisk walking, stationary cycling activities that get the heart pumping
  • Strengthening e.g. using weights or resistance bands to improve muscle strength
  • Balance e.g. tai chi, dance to help you be more steady on your feet
  • Stretching e.g. mat exercises, yoga to provide flexibility
  • Including all four of these elements in your exercise regimen is ideal .

    Aerobic activity or high-intensity exercise may be particularly important for Parkinsons and general health

    High-intensity exercise has been formally studied in PD with impressive results. The Study in Parkinson Disease of Exercise Phase 2 enrolled 128 people with early PD, who were not yet on dopaminergic medication into three groups:

    • a high-intensity treadmill exercise group, in which people exercised at 80-85% of their maximum heart rate
    • a moderate-intensity treadmill exercise group, in which people exercised at 60-65% of their maximum heart rate
    • a wait-list control group

    After six months, the high-intensity group had essentially no change in their motor scores, whereas the control group had a three-point worsening of their motor scores.

    Currently, the SPARX3 trial is enrolling participants and underway. This trial is similar to SPARX2, but with a goal of studying many more participants.

    Forced exercise

    Cognitive challenges in exercise

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    Physical Therapy For Parkinsons Disease

    Its well-known that exercise of all kinds is beneficial for patients with Parkinsons disease. But physical therapy, in particular, is key. Why? A professional can guide you through the right moves to increase mobility, strength and balance, and help you remain independent, says Denise Padilla-Davidson, a Johns Hopkins physical therapist who works with patients who have Parkinsons. Here are things a therapist may work on:

    Note: Please discuss any exercise program with your physician/neurologist and get a referral to a physical therapist or trainer with expertise in Parkinsons disease before starting any specific program.

    Exercise Tips For Parkinsons

    Exercise is a vital part of the daily routine for anyone living with Parkinsons.

    It doesnt have to be repetitive or boring. It can be as fun and as imaginative as you allow it to be. The keys are consistency, force and complexity. Firstly, lets have a look at how your symptoms can be improved with specific exercises.

    If you have difficulty in these areas Focus on these exercises

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    Tips For Exercising Safely

    Before starting an exercise program, consult with your neurologist and primary care doctor about any health concerns and ask for recommendations, the Parkinsons Foundation advises.

    Ask your doctor to refer you to a physical therapist who knows about Parkinsons together, the two of you can identify any concerns and physical limitations you may have. Your exercise regimen should be targeted to address your symptoms and physical limitations.

    You should stop any exercise or stretch that causes pain, and take steps to prevent falls while exercising, such as:

    • If indoors, remove area or throw rugs
    • Work out in well-lit areas
    • Dont use rolling chairs
    • Work out with friends or buddies, particularly when performing outdoor activities
    • Stay hydrated
    • Avoid overexertion

    Adverse Side Effects Of The Training

    PWR!Moves for Parkinsons

    Two patients of the NW group and one patient of the walking group experienced exercise-induced hypotension after intense walking uphill in hot weather. Patients felt dizzy but did not lose consciousness and recovered after fluid intake within 10min.

    During the supervised 6-month training period, four patients of the NW group fell due to obstacles. The falls did not lead to severe injuries. Five patients twisted their ankles during cross-country walking, but only one patient complained of pain and missed three training sessions. Two patients of the NW group developed shoulder pain which required medical treatment with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Both patients abstained from sports activities for one week.

    Four patients of the walking group had falls during the supervised 6-month training period. Two patients tripped over roots and two patients slipped on wet ground while walking downhill. There was one fall in the flexibility and relaxation group during an attempt to stand up from the floor.

    Muscle soreness was reported in all groups by 15% of the patients during the first three weeks of exercising.

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    What Type Of Exercise Should I Do If I Have Parkinson’s Disease

    Exercise is a planned, structured, repetitive activity that is intended to improve physical fitness. There is no right exercise for people with Parkinsons. Everyones regimen will differ, depending on overall health, symptoms and previous level of activity. Any exercise helps, and a variety of exercise types may provide well-rounded benefits.

    Aerobic exercise

    Aerobic exercise involves activities that challenge your cardiorespiratory system such as walking, biking, running, and activities in the pool. Participating in aerobic exercise at least three days a week for 30-40 minutes may slow Parkinsons decline.

    Strength training

    Strength training involves using your body weight or other tools to build muscle mass and strength. Strength training two days per week, starting with low repetition and weight, may be beneficial in Parkinsons disease. A focus on extensor muscles, or muscles in the back of the body, can help with posture.

    Flexibility training

    Stretching two or more days per week can be beneficial to maintain range of motion and posture. Holding each stretch of major muscle groups for 30 to 60 seconds can improve muscle length.

    Balance and agility training

    This type of training often combines aerobic exercise, strength training, and flexibility training. Examples include:

    • Dancing.
    • Tai chi, yoga or Pilates.

    Choosing The Right Exercise Class For Parkinsons

    When trying to find an exercise class to join, it can be hard to know which ones to try because there are many different types of classes that are marketed to people with PD. When you are evaluating a class, it is important to remember the following:

    • It is the components of the exercise class that are important . You do not need to specifically do boxing or dance if you can achieve these elements of exercise in other ways.
    • The instructor should have expertise in PD. APDA offers a training for fitness professionals which helps them better understand how to create exercise programs best suited for people with PD.
    • The ratio of class members to instructors should be low enough to maintain safety.
    • The class should be adaptable for people of different abilities and mobility. Many classes will offer seated options or other modifications.

    It may take a few tries to find the types of exercise that suits you best so dont give up! Feel free to try different classes in your area to see what types of exercise appeal to you. It can also be motivating to take classes together with a friend or family member. You can hold each other accountable, and also have some fun together. As you find classes you enjoy, you can incorporate those modalities into your exercise schedule. For help in finding classes in your area, you can contact one of our Chapters or Information & Referral Centers. There are also many virtual classes that you can join from home.

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    Are There Any Risks Of Exercising With Parkinsons Disease

    Some symptoms, like Parkinsons tremors, may seem worse during exercise. But exercise generally improves tremors and other symptoms in the long run.

    Reduce challenges by stretching before and after exercise. Use good form to prevent injury. And avoid slippery floors, poor lighting and tripping hazards. If you have pain, stop and rest.

    Pushing yourself too hard during exercise can lead to injury. Start slowly and increase intensity and duration over time. Keep a log to track your exercise choices and how you feel. Eventually, youll learn what works best for you.

    How Hard Should I Exercise If I Have Parkinson’s Disease

    Parkinsons Disease Exercises: Seated Workout

    A rating of perceived exertion is a good way to measure intensity. On a scale from 0 to 10, 0 would be how you feel while sitting or lying down, while 10 would be the maximum effort you can give. Building up to an effort between 5 to 8 means you are exercising at a high intensity. A good gauge is, if you can have a conversation with someone while exercising, you should probably increase your intensity.

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    What Types Of Exercise Are Best For People With Parkinsons Disease

    In last weeks blog, we addressed the reasons why it is vital for people with Parkinsons disease to exercise, including improving particular motor and non-motor symptoms such as impaired balance, gait disorders, depression, and cognition.

    Today, we will tackle another important question what types of exercise are most beneficial to help people with Parkinsons disease improve their quality of life? Well also address several specific types of exercise designed for people with PD and some tips on how to get started with an exercise program.

    How Exercise Helps With Parkinsons Symptom Management

    In general, the Parkinsons Foundation says, exercise helps improve gait, balance, flexibility, and grip strength while reducing tremors. A review of existing research published in the August 2016 edition of the journal Frontiers in Medicine found that exercise may also improve cognition, while reducing depression and fatigue.

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    Day 3 Focus: Abdominal Lumbar And Hip Strength

    Remember: Your core is made up of 35+ muscles and a majority of them arent on your stomach!

    There are a lot of muscles that go into moving your pelvis, spine, and rib cage and if youre only using crunches to train your core, youre missing a few big pieces of the puzzle.

    Perform these exercises 3-4 times per week for best results.

    Does kneeling hurt your knees? Try putting a towel under them for additional support.

    New Types Of Exercise For Parkinsons

    Balance Exercises: Parkinson

    Researchers are continually studying different types of exercise for PD and APDA works to keep you informed about these new findings.

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    How To Stay Motivated

    Make exercise a regular part of your day

    Set a consistent time to exercise every day. Keep it the same time so that you know how it works in around your medication and is timed when you are typically feeling at your best.

    If you are really busy, you might find breaking your programme down into several manageable 10minute chunks suits you better. There is good evidence to show that this is still effective to receive a cardiovascular and strength training. For amplitude and motor output training this is sufficient as well. Perhaps you might schedule a few exercises for when you wake up in the morning, another round at midmorning, lunch, midafternoon, and then evening. See what works best for you with your lifestyle and medication schedule, but make sure you plan it, do it and record it.

    If you are particularly short of time, avoid the temptation to throw in the towel completely. Do what you have time to do. Something is better than nothing at all. Even five minutes of targeted exercises done well may yield results when done consistently.

    Stay Motivated with Goal Setting
    Start Recording and Charting in Your Diary

    Record each of your sessions in the back of this booklet. Even if it is only a 10-minute session. It is important that you can add up the total number of minutes spent exercising at the end of each week.

    Workout with a buddy
    Building a Strong Foundation
  • Start Simple Set yourself up for success and start with 10 minutes each day and build up!
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