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Sunday, February 25, 2024
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Conditions Similar To Parkinson’s

Parkinsons Disease Symptoms Of Dementia

Covid-19, similar response in the brain can trigger Parkinson’s disease, working allegations

Up to one-third of people living with Parkinsons disease experience dementia, according to the Parkinsons Disease Foundation. Problems with dementia may include trouble with memory, attention span, and what is called executive function the process of making decisions, organizing, managing time, and setting priorities.

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How Is Psp Different From Parkinsons Disease

PSP is often misdiagnosed as Parkinsons disease, especially early in the disorder, as they share many symptoms, including stiffness, movement difficulties, clumsiness, bradykinesia , and rigidity of muscles. The onset of both diseases is in late middle age. However, PSP progresses more rapidly than Parkinsons disease.

  • People with PSP usually stand exceptionally straight or occasionally tilt their heads backward . This is termed axial rigidity. Those with Parkinsons disease usually bend forward.
  • Problems with speech and swallowing are much more common and severe in PSP than in Parkinsons disease and tend to show up earlier in the disease.
  • Eye movements are abnormal in PSP but close to normal in Parkinsons disease.
  • Tremor is rare in PSP but very common in individuals with Parkinsons disease.

Although individuals with Parkinsons disease markedly benefit from the drug levodopa, people with PSP respond minimally and only briefly to this drug.

People with PSP show accumulation of the protein tau in affected brain cells, whereas people with Parkinsons disease show accumulation of a different protein called alpha-synuclein.

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How Are They Alike

MS and Parkinsonâs both affect your central nervous system, which includes your brain and spinal cord. Thatâs why they both can affect how you move, sleep, feel, and talk.

These diseases both affect your nerves. MS can break down the coating, called myelin, that surrounds and protects your nerves. In Parkinsonâs, nerve cells in a part of your brain slowly die off.

Both can start out with mild symptoms, but they get worse over time.

Common symptoms of both diseases include:

  • Shaky fingers, hands, lips, or limbs
  • Slurred speech thatâs hard for others to understand
  • Numb or weak limbs that make your walk unsteady
  • Loss of muscle control that often affects one side of your body at first, then later both
  • Spastic limb movements that are hard to control
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control

Depression is another symptom common to both conditions.

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Understanding Parkinsons & Conditions That Mimic Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons Disease is a complex progressive neurological disease involving the loss of neurons in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra. This results in a reduction in the amount of dopamine, a chemical messenger or neurotransmitter. When this important chemical in the brain is depleted, the symptoms of Parkinsons Disease develop.

However, Parkinsons Disease is far from being the only movement disorder that one can develop. Symptoms such as tremors, muscle rigidity, slow movement, impaired balance, and impaired coordination can all be associated with other conditions as well as Parkinsons. Specialist diagnosis and support is the best route to take if you are struggling with these symptoms. Having a clear view of the specific disease you are experiencing will eventually lead to a more appropriate, and therefore more effective, treatment plan.

Dementech is a private clinic based in London specialising in the treatment of Parkinsons. If you or a family member needs specialist treatment for Parkinsons Disease at any stage of its development, please contact us and we will be happy to provide any support you need.

How Is Parkinson’s Disease Managed

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Your doctors will tailor your treatment based on your individual circumstances. You will manage your condition best if you have the support of a team, which may include a general practitioner, neurologist, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, psychologist, specialist nurse and dietitian.

While there is no cure for Parkinson’s disease, symptoms can be treated with a combination of the following.

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Parkinsons And Huntingtons Vs Alzheimers Disease

As with Huntingtons disease and Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease is a neurodegenerative condition affecting the brain. All three diseases can cause debilitating effects and impact an individuals daily life.

However, Alzheimers disease primarily affects an individuals memory, thoughts, and behavior and does not affect movement as markedly as Huntingtons disease and Parkinsons disease.

Like Alzheimers disease, Huntingtons disease can also cause

How Is Parkinsonism Diagnosed

You should be referred to a Parkinsons specialist for the diagnosis of any parkinsonism. They may wish to explore different things before giving you a diagnosis.

Your specialist will look at your medical history, ask you about your symptoms and do a medical examination.

Telling the difference between types of parkinsonism isnt always easy, for the following reasons:

  • The first symptoms of the different forms of parkinsonism are so similar.
  • In many cases, parkinsonism develops gradually. Symptoms that allow your doctor to make a specific diagnosis may only appear as your condition progresses.
  • Everyone with parkinsonism is different and has different symptoms.

Find out more: see our information on symptoms of Parkinsons, and diagnosing Parkinsons.

One of the most useful tests to find out what sort of parkinsonism you may have is to see how you respond to treatment.

If your specialist thinks you have idiopathic Parkinsons, theyll expect you to have a good response to Parkinsons drugs such as levodopa . A good response means that your symptoms will improve. Sometimes, it will only be clear that youve responded to medication when the drug is reduced or stopped, and your symptoms become more obvious again.

If you dont have any response to Parkinsons medication, your specialist will have to look again at your diagnosis.

Although not routinely available, your specialist may wish to carry out some of the tests below.

Current tests available include:

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The Inflammasome Pathway Sparked A Fire In The Brain

The spike protein of the COVID-19 virus was enough to start the process of brain inflammation and could be further exacerbated when there were already proteins in the brain linked to Parkinsons disease.

Dr Albornoz Balmaceda said triggering the inflammasome pathway sparked a fire in the brain, which begins a chronic and sustained process of killing off neurons. He stated that Its kind of a silent killer, because you dont see any outward symptoms for many years.

Parkinsons Disease Vs Als: Risk Factors And Complications

The significance of glial cells in the pathophysiology of ALS

Risk factors for Parkinsons disease include being over the age of 50, being male, having a family history of Parkinsons disease, carrying gene variations, experiencing a head injury, being exposed to environmental toxins, and taking certain medications such as anti-anxiety medications or sleeping pills.

Complications associated with Parkinsons disease include difficulty thinking, depression, emotional changes, swallowing problems, sleep problems and disorders, bladder issues, constipation, changes in blood pressure, smell dysfunction, fatigue, pain, and sexual dysfunction.

Studies into ALS have revealed some interesting insight. For example, it may just be that some people with this disease are triggered by certain environmental factors. The environmental triggers under investigation include smoking, lead exposure, and military service. Recent research has indicated that people who have served in the military are at a higher risk of getting ALS.

Studies are also looking at the entire human genome, since research has uncovered a number of genetic variations that people with familial ALS and some with non-inherited ALS have in common. These variations might make people more prone to ALS.

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Medicines For Parkinsons Disease

Medicines prescribed for Parkinsons include:

  • Drugs that increase the level of dopamine in the brain
  • Drugs that affect other brain chemicals in the body
  • Drugs that help control nonmotor symptoms

The main therapy for Parkinsons is levodopa, also called L-dopa. Nerve cells use levodopa to make dopamine to replenish the brains dwindling supply. Usually, people take levodopa along with another medication called carbidopa. Carbidopa prevents or reduces some of the side effects of levodopa therapysuch as nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, and restlessnessand reduces the amount of levodopa needed to improve symptoms.

People with Parkinsons should never stop taking levodopa without telling their doctor. Suddenly stopping the drug may have serious side effects, such as being unable to move or having difficulty breathing.

Other medicines used to treat Parkinsons symptoms include:

  • Dopamine agonists to mimic the role of dopamine in the brain
  • MAO-B inhibitors to slow down an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain
  • COMT inhibitors to help break down dopamine
  • Amantadine, an old antiviral drug, to reduce involuntary movements
  • Anticholinergic drugs to reduce tremors and muscle rigidity

What Is The Prognosis

The disease gets progressively worse, with people becoming severely disabled within three to five years of onset. Affected individuals are predisposed to serious complications such as pneumonia, choking, head injury, and fractures. The most common cause of death is pneumonia. With good attention to medical and nutritional needs, it is possible for individuals with PSP to live a decade or more after the first symptoms of the disease appear.

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What Looks Like Parkinsons But Isnt

Dr. Fernandez describes two main Parkinsons mimics:

Essential tremor. Also known as benign essential tremor or familial tremor, this movement disorder causes brief, uncontrollable shaking.

It most often affects your hands, but can also affect your head and neck, larynx and other areas. In rare cases, it affects your lower body as well.

But one clue can help distinguish essential tremor from Parkinsons.

This is not an absolute rule, but if shaking occurs at rest, it often is Parkinsons. And if shaking occurs in action, such as when youre writing or eating, it is essential tremor, Dr. Fernandez says.

About half of those with essential tremor have a family history of the condition.

Unlike Parkinsons, essential tremor is generally not perceived as a progressive disorder, and, if mild, may not require treatment.

Doctors can prescribe medications to reduce shaking, but they are not the same drugs used to treat Parkinsons, he says.

Drug-induced Parkinsons. Along with shaking, this condition may cause many symptoms similar to Parkinsons disease, including stiffness, slow movement, a decrease in facial expression and a change in speech.

As the name suggests, taking certain drugs, most commonly antipsychotics and mood stabilizers, can trigger this condition. How long it takes to develop can vary greatly, depending on which drug youre taking, how long you take it and the dosage.

Your doctor likely will treat drug-induced Parkinsons by adjusting your medication.

What Causes Parkinsons Disease

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Parkinsons disease occurs when nerve cells, or neurons, in an area of the brain that controls movement become impaired and/or die. Normally, these neurons produce an important brain chemical known as dopamine. When the neurons die or become impaired, they produce less dopamine, which causes the movement problems of Parkinsons. Scientists still do not know what causes cells that produce dopamine to die.

People with Parkinsons also lose the nerve endings that produce norepinephrine, the main chemical messenger of the sympathetic nervous system, which controls many functions of the body, such as heart rate and blood pressure. The loss of norepinephrine might help explain some of the non-movement features of Parkinsons, such as fatigue, irregular blood pressure, decreased movement of food through the digestive tract, and sudden drop in blood pressure when a person stands up from a sitting or lying-down position.

Many brain cells of people with Parkinsons contain Lewy bodies, unusual clumps of the protein alpha-synuclein. Scientists are trying to better understand the normal and abnormal functions of alpha-synuclein and its relationship to genetic mutations that impact Parkinsons disease and Lewy body dementia.

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Other Diseases Related To Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons disease is a popular disease, even though it is quite rear. This disease affects roughly 1% of the worlds population. It is predominant in white males. There are a lot of other diseases and disorders related to Parkinsons disease.New studies done on Parkinsons and related diseases have revealed a few connections between this disease and a few other disorders as well. Here is a list of some of the diseases related to Parkinsons Disease:

  • Melanoma :It is suspected that melanoma might be one of the diseases related to Parkinsons disease. Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer.
  • Symptoms: Melanomas symptoms can be observed by checking the skin for any abnormalities. Check for any suspicious moles, pigmentation or any unnatural growth on your skin. They usually occur in areas of thebody that are frequently exposed to the sun, though they do occur in some places that do not get any sun at all. There are some hidden forms of melanoma as well.
  • Causes: Melanoma is usually caused because of problems related to melanin production in the body. The reasons for the problems in the DNA are not really well known. However, over- exposure to the harmful rays of the sun, overuse of tanning machines etc. are known to be causes leading to melanoma.
  • Diagnosis: The only way to diagnose melanoma is through biopsy. The doctor would know what kind of biopsy would be best suited for your situation.
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    How Is Parkinsons Disease Treated

    There is no cure for Parkinsons disease. However, medications and other treatments can help relieve some of your symptoms. Exercise can help your Parkinsons symptoms significantly. In addition, physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language therapy can help with walking and balance problems, eating and swallowing challenges and speech problems. Surgery is an option for some patients.

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    Key Difference Parkinsons Vs Huntingtons Disease

    The key difference between Parkinsons and Huntingtons disease is that Parkinson diseaseis a disorder with rigidity, tremors, slowing of movements, postural instability and gait disturbances usually occurring in old age due to degeneration of the substantia nigra of the midbrain while Huntingtons disease is a familial neurodegenerative disorder usually occurring in a younger population, characterized by emotional problems, loss of thinking ability and abnormal choreiform movements .

    Whats The Difference Between Drug

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    Parkinsons is a progressive disorder, which will become worse over time, while DIP does not. In DIP, Parkinson-like symptoms can begin within four days to one month of starting the medication. However, all the symptoms could completely subside once the effecting medication is stopped, though it may take up to 18 months for all the symptoms to subside.

    For more information on drug-induced parkinsonism, read this journal article and/or information sheet.

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    How Is Parkinsons Diagnosed

    Doctors use your medical history and physical examination to diagnose Parkinsons disease . No blood test, brain scan or other test can be used to make a definitive diagnosis of PD.

    Researchers believe that in most people, Parkinsons is caused by a combination ofenvironmental and geneticfactors. Certain environmental exposures, such as pesticides and head injury, are associated with an increased risk of PD. Still, most people have no clear exposure that doctors can point to as a straightforward cause. The same goes for genetics. Certain genetic mutations are linked to an increased risk of PD. But in the vast majority of people, Parkinsons is not directly related to a single genetic mutation. Learning more about the genetics of Parkinsons is one of our best chances to understand more about the disease and discover how to slow or stop its progression.

    Aging is the greatest risk factor for Parkinsons, and the average age at diagnosis is 60. Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

    Men are diagnosed with Parkinsons at a higher rate than women and whites more than other races. Researchers are studying these disparities to understand more about the disease and health care access and to improve inclusivity across care and research.

    Aging is the greatest risk factor for Parkinsons, and the average age at diagnosis is 60. Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

    The Michael J. Fox Foundation has made finding a test for Parkinsons disease one of our top priorities.

    Sidebar: Morris K Udall Centers Of Excellence For Parkinson’s Disease Research

    The Morris K. Udall Parkinsons Disease Research Act of 1997 authorized the NIH to greatly accelerate and expand PD research efforts by launching the NINDS Udall Centers of Excellence, a network of research centers that provide a collaborative, interdisciplinary framework for PD research. Udall Center investigators, along with many other researchers funded by the NIH, have made substantial progress in understanding PD, including identifying disease-associated genes investigating the neurobiological mechanisms that contribute to PD, developing and improving PD research models, and discovering and testing potential therapeutic targets for developing novel treatment strategies.

    The Udall Centers continue to conduct critical basic, translational, and clinical research on PD including: 1) identifying and characterizing candidate and disease-associated genes, 2) examining neurobiological mechanisms underlying the disease, and 3) developing and testing potential therapies. As part of the program, Udall Center investigators work with local communities of patients and caregivers to identify the challenges of living with PD and to translate scientific discoveries into patient care. The Centers also train the next generation of physicians and scientists who will advance our knowledge of and treatments for PD. See the full list of Udall Centers.

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    Living Well With Parkinson’s

    While medication and DBS surgery are the most effective treatments for PD, individuals often choose to delay these treatments because of their adverse side effects. Until a therapy is developed that can halt the progression of PD, there is a significant need for strategies that provide symptom relief without causing negative side effects.

    Diet, Exercise, and Stress Reduction

    Findings from several studies suggest that exercise has the potential to provide relief from certain PD symptoms. Anecdotally, people with Parkinsons disease who exercise typically do better. However, many questions remain. Among them is whether exercise provides a conditioning effect by strengthening muscles and improving flexibility or whether it has a direct effect on the brain.

    In an NINDS-funded trial comparing the benefits of tai chi, resistance training, and stretching, tai chi was found to reduce balance impairments in people with mild-to-moderate PD. People in the tai chi group also experienced significantly fewer falls and greater improvements in their functional capacity.

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