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What Are The First Signs Of Parkinson’s

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What Is The Treatment For Parkinsons Disease

Recognizing Early Signs of Parkinsons Disease

There is currently no treatment to cure Parkinsons disease. Several therapies are available to delay the onset of motor symptoms and to ameliorate motor symptoms. All of these therapies are designed to increase the amount of dopamine in the brain either by replacing dopamine, mimicking dopamine, or prolonging the effect of dopamine by inhibiting its breakdown. Studies have shown that early therapy in the non-motor stage can delay the onset of motor symptoms, thereby extending quality of life.

The most effective therapy for Parkinsons disease is levodopa , which is converted to dopamine in the brain. However, because long-term treatment with levodopa can lead to unpleasant side effects , its use is often delayed until motor impairment is more severe. Levodopa is frequently prescribed together with , which prevents levodopa from being broken down before it reaches the brain. Co-treatment with carbidopa allows for a lower levodopa dose, thereby reducing side effects.

In earlier stages of Parkinsons disease, substances that mimic the action of dopamine , and substances that reduce the breakdown of dopamine inhibitors) can be very efficacious in relieving motor symptoms. Unpleasant side effects of these preparations are quite common, including swelling caused by fluid accumulation in body tissues, drowsiness, , , hallucinations, and .

The Early Warning Signs Of Parkinsons Disease

    Parkinsons disease is an illness that affects the nervous system and movement. About 10 million people worldwide have the disease, and symptoms typically begin around the age of 60. Early PD warning signs and symptoms can be tough to spot because they start slowly and gradually.

    However, if you or someone you love exhibits one or more of the following signs, consider making an appointment with a specialist or doctor.

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    Alternative Therapies To Treat Parkinsons Disease

    Although no herbs or supplements have been approved by the FDA to treat Parkinsons, there are a variety of alternative therapies currently being researched.

    • Calcium supplements are often prescribed because dairy makes it harder for the body to absorb levodopa.
    • Coenzyme Q10 is an antioxidant thought to improve mitochondria health. Some researchers believe abnormal function of the mitochondria may play a role in Parkinsons.
    • Creatine may help increase levels of phosphocreatine, a substance that provides energy to the brain.
    • Folate, aka vitamin B9, is vital to both brain health and the nervous system.
    • Ginger is often recommended to reduce nausea caused by medications.
    • The Mediterranean Diet may help manage symptoms and reduce blood pressure.
    • Vitamin D supplements may be needed to help your body absorb calcium, particularly if you dont get enough sunshine.
    • Vitamin E may help fight damage to brain cells caused by free radicals, although studies concluded it does nothing to manage symptoms after diagnosis.

    Finally, anecdotal evidence suggests that medical marijuana, now legal in 33 states plus Washington, D.C., may help patients with Parkinsons disease. The Parkinsons Foundation has a full page on the research being conducted to determine whether medical marijuana is a viable treatment option for PD patients.

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    Masked Face Is Not Uncommon For Someone With Parkinsons Disease

    Often a persons face becomes stiff and seems frozen in place. There may appear to be a grouchy or angry look about them. Or they may be staring ahead without blinking or expression. This can cause distress for them and those around them. People who are not aware of their condition may be uncomfortable around them.

    Who Is Affected By Tremor

    Parkinson

    About 70% of people with Parkinsons experience a tremor at some point in the disease. Tremor appears to be slightly less common in younger people with PD, though it is still one of the most troublesome symptoms. People with resting tremor usually have a more slowly progressing course of illness than people without tremor.

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    Is There A Way To Slow The Progress Of Parkinson’s

    Parkinson’s disease is a progressive disorder, which means its symptoms worsen slowly over time. There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease yet and no known way to slow its progress.

    But there are treatments and medications that can control or reduce the symptoms and help people live productive lives. Some research suggests that regular exercise may slow the progress of Parkinson’s. Physical activity can also alleviate stiffness and other symptoms.

    There are other things a person can do to feel better after a diagnosis of Parkinson’s, such as joining social support groups and learning as much as possible about the disease. It’s also important to make the home safer and less cluttered, since a person with Parkinson’s is more likely to fall.

    While it’s not always easy, neurologists say a positive mindset can also help.

    What Is Rem Behavior Disorder And How Is It Connected To Parkinson’s

    A: REM behavior disorder is different than other sleep problems, like insomnia. People who have it may jerk or kick it’s as though they are acting out their dreams. In a similar pattern to anosmia, people with idiopathic REM sleep behavior disorder have at least a 50 percent chance of eventually developing Parkinson’s disease.

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    There Are A Few Factors That Can Contribute To A Shift In Posture

    In addition to the changes to your autonomic nervous system, there are a few other reasons people with Parkinson’s experience stooped or hunched posture. According to the Parkinson’s Foundation, possible contributing factors include being in one position for too long, concentrating on another activity, and muscle stiffness or rigidity

    “Since people affected by Parkinson’s disease lose control over their muscles to a certain degree, they experience uncontrolled stiffening of limbs,” explains family physicianWaqas Ahmad, MBBS. This stiffening can contribute to a hunched posture.

    Other Typical Symptoms Of Parkinson’s

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    Tremor is;an uncontrollable movement that affects a part of the body. A Parkinsons tremor typically starts in the hand before spreading to affect the rest of the arm, or down to the foot on the same side of the body.;

    There is no cure for a tremor, but there are ways to manage the symptom with support from a specialist or Parkinsons nurse.

    Slowness of movement also known as bradykinesia may mean that it takes someone with;Parkinson’s;longer to do things. For example, they might struggle with coordination, walking may become more like a shuffle or;walking speed may slow down.;

    Everyday tasks, such as paying for items at a check-out or walking to a bus stop, might take;longer to do.

    Parkinsons causes stiff muscles, inflexibility and cramps. This can make certain tasks such as writing, doing up buttons or tying shoe laces, hard to do. Rigidity can stop muscles from stretching and relaxing. It can be particularly noticeable, for example, if you;struggle to turn over or get in and out of bed.

    Symptoms and the rate at which they develop will vary from person to person. The most important thing to do if youre worried you have Parkinsons is to speak to your GP.;

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    Medicines For Parkinson’s Disease

    Medicines prescribed for Parkinson’s include:

    • Drugs that increase the level of dopamine in the brain
    • Drugs that affect other brain chemicals in the body
    • Drugs that help control nonmotor symptoms

    The main therapy for Parkinson’s is levodopa, also called L-dopa. Nerve cells use levodopa to make dopamine to replenish the brain’s dwindling supply. Usually, people take levodopa along with another medication called carbidopa. Carbidopa prevents or reduces some of the side effects of levodopa therapysuch as nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, and restlessnessand reduces the amount of levodopa needed to improve symptoms.

    People with Parkinson’s should never stop taking levodopa without telling their doctor. Suddenly stopping the drug may have serious side effects, such as being unable to move or having difficulty breathing.

    Other medicines used to treat Parkinsons symptoms include:

    • Dopamine agonists to mimic the role of dopamine in the brain
    • MAO-B inhibitors to slow down an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain
    • COMT inhibitors to help break down dopamine
    • Amantadine, an old antiviral drug, to reduce involuntary movements
    • Anticholinergic drugs to reduce tremors and muscle rigidity

    Symptoms Of Parkinsons Disease

    Parkinson’s disease has four main symptoms:

    • Tremor in hands, arms, legs, jaw, or head
    • Stiffness of the limbs and trunk
    • Slowness of movement
    • Impaired balance and coordination, sometimes leading to falls

    Other symptoms may include depression and other emotional changes; difficulty swallowing, chewing, and speaking; urinary problems or constipation; skin problems; and sleep disruptions.

    Symptoms of Parkinsons and the rate of progression differ among individuals. Sometimes people dismiss early symptoms of Parkinson’s as the effects of normal aging. In most cases, there are no medical tests to definitively detect the disease, so it can be difficult to diagnose accurately.

    Early symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are subtle and occur gradually. For example, affected people may feel mild tremors or have difficulty getting out of a chair. They may notice that they speak too softly, or that their handwriting is slow and looks cramped or small. Friends or family members may be the first to notice changes in someone with early Parkinson’s. They may see that the person’s face lacks expression and animation, or that the person does not move an arm or leg normally.

    People with Parkinson’s often develop a parkinsonian gait that includes a tendency to lean forward, small quick steps as if hurrying forward, and reduced swinging of the arms. They also may have trouble initiating or continuing movement.

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    Stage Three Of Parkinsons Disease

    Stage three is considered mid-stage and is characterized by loss of and of movement.

    Balance is compromised by the inability to make the rapid, automatic and involuntary adjustments necessary to prevent falling, and falls are common at this stage. All other symptoms of PD are also present at this stage, and generally diagnosis is not in doubt at stage three.

    Often a physician will diagnose impairments in reflexes at this stage by standing behind the patient and gently pulling the shoulders to determine if the patient has trouble maintaining balance and falls backward . An important clarifying factor of stage three is that the patient is still fully independent in their daily living activities, such as dressing, hygiene, and eating.

    What Is Parkinson’s Disease

    10 Early Signs of Parkinson

    Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder and the most common movement disorder. Characteristics of Parkinsons disease are progressive loss of muscle control, which leads to trembling of the limbs and head while at rest, stiffness, slowness, and impaired balance. As symptoms worsen, it may become difficult to walk, talk, and complete simple tasks.

    The progression of Parkinson’s disease and the degree of impairment vary from person to person. Many people with Parkinson’s disease live long productive lives, whereas others become disabled much more quickly. Complications of Parkinsons such as falling-related injuries or pneumonia. However, studies of patent populations with and without Parkinsons Disease suggest the life expectancy for people with the disease is about the same as the general population.

    Most people who develop Parkinson’s disease are 60 years of age or older. Since overall life expectancy is rising, the number of individuals with Parkinson’s disease will increase in the future. Adult-onset Parkinson’s disease is most common, but early-onset Parkinson’s disease , and juvenile-onset Parkinson’s disease can occur.

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      Stooping Or Hunched Posture

      People who have Parkinsons disease may notice changes in their posture due to other symptoms of the disease, such as muscle rigidity.

      People naturally stand so that their weight is evenly distributed over their feet. However, people who have Parkinsons disease may start bending forward, making them appear hunched or stooped over.

      Five Early Signs Of Parkinsons Disease

      In order to help people reach an;appropriate diagnosis and receive suitable Parkinsons care, the National Parkinson Foundation shared some of the most . Paying attention to the following signs could help you consider talking with a health care professional about the possibility of your having Parkinsons disease.;

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      R = Rem Sleep Behavior Disorder

      REM Sleep Behavior Disorder is a problem related to dreams.

      When a person without Parkinsons disease sleeps, the body is paralyzed. Thus, he/she cannot move or act out their dreams. This is a normal process.

      When Parkinsons patients sleep, this does not happen. So, they may act out their dreams.

      Parkinsons patients may start talking when sleeping. They may walk or run while sleeping, and sometimes thrash wildly.

      These movements can be violent. They can hurt the patient or the person sleeping beside them.

      This problem of moving while dreaming is called REM Sleep Behavior Disorder .

      You can read more about sleep problems with Parkinsons here: .

      Also, here is a good website explaining RBD in greater detail.

      Do What You Can While You Can

      10 Early Signs of Parkinson’s Disease

      I have had Parkinsons disease for nearly 20 years. My wife is a teacher, so we travel every summer when she is not working. Since my diagnosis, I have been to China, Nepal, Prague, Paris and many other places. The Parkinsons comes along, too, so our trips require more planning than they used to and we involve my care team. We factor in daily naps and take it slow. My balance isnt as good as it used to be and too much walking wears me out so we bring a collapsible wheelchair along or make sure one is available. I also use a cane. I dont know how many more places we will get to visit as my disease continues to progress, but we have made some wonderful memories that we wouldnt have if we had let my Parkinsons dictate every aspect of our lives. Nicholas, diagnosed at 52, still traveling at 72

      Many people with Parkinsons disease are not allowing the condition to take over their lives. Despite the everyday setbacks they face, they are still creating fulfilling lives for themselves by redirecting their attention to people and activities that bring them joy. You can do the same. Try building a few hobbies into your routine that will give you a break from dwelling on the disease. Find some activities that help you forget about Parkinsons for a while. That may be painting, writing, gardening, or reading to your grandchildren. ;

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      If You Develop A Tremor

      Urgent medical care isn’t needed if you’ve had a tremorâshaking or tremblingâfor some time. But you should discuss the tremor at your next doctor’s appointment.

      If a tremor is affecting your daily activities or if it’s a new symptom, see your doctor sooner.

      A written description will help your doctor make a correct diagnosis. In writing your description, consider the following questions:

      • Did the tremor start suddenly or gradually?
      • What makes it worse or better?
      • What parts of your body are affected?
      • Have there been any recent changes in the medicines you take or how much you take?

      How Will Parkinson’s Disease Affect Your Life

      Finding out that you have a long-term, progressive disease can lead to a wide range of feelings. You may feel angry, afraid, sad, or worried about what lies ahead. It may help to keep a few things in mind:

      • Usually this disease progresses slowly. Some people live for many years with only minor symptoms.
      • Many people are able to keep working for years. As the disease gets worse, you may need to change how you work.
      • It is important to take an active role in your health care. Find a doctor you trust and can work with.
      • Depression is common in people who have Parkinson’s. If you feel very sad or hopeless, talk to your doctor or see a counselor.
      • It can make a big difference to know that you’re not alone. Ask your doctor about Parkinson’s support groups, or look for online groups or message boards.
      • Parkinson’s affects more than just the person who has it. It also affects your loved ones. Be sure to include them in your decisions.

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      What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

      Each person with Parkinsons disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinsons disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms; others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

      In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

      Early stage

      Early symptoms of Parkinsons disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

      Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

      Mid stage

      Mid-late stage

      Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

      Advanced stage

      What Is Parkinson’s Disease Its A Movement Disorder

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      Parkinson’s disease is a progressive brain illness that affects the way you move. In more clinical terms, Parkinsons disease is a neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system.

      Normally, there are cells in the brain that produce a chemical called dopamine. Dopamine sends signals to the parts of your brain that control movement. When approximately 60-80% of the dopamine-producing brain cells are damaged, symptoms of Parkinson’s disease appear, and you may have trouble moving the way you want.

      Parkinson’s disease is a chronic illness and it slowly progresses over time. While there is no therapy or medicine that cures Parkinsons disease, there are good treatment options available that can help you live a full life.

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