Thursday, June 16, 2022
Thursday, June 16, 2022
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How To Deal With Parkinson Patient

How Is Psychosis Managed

Dealing with Dementia in Parkinson’s Disease

The urgency of treatment will depend on the type and characteristics of psychosis. Sometimes, when the hallucinations are mild and benign, and insight is retained, it is best that the Parkinson regimen be kept as is. However, when a patient is experiencing more threatening paranoid delusions, then more aggressive treatment is warranted .

The management of psychosis includes:

  • Ruling out the possible reversible causes
  • Simplifying the Parkinsons disease medication regimen
  • Adding a new or second generation antipsychotic
  • If psychosis occurs in a Parkinsons disease patient with cognitive impairment or dementia, a cholinesterase inhibitor may be considered
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    Deep Brain Stimulation For Parkinson’s: Am I A Candidate

    Deep brain stimulation is not a cure, but it can relieve your symptoms from Parkinson’s disease when medications are not an option. Only you and your doctor can decide if this surgical procedure is right for you. You may be a candidate for deep brain stimulation if:

    • You have idiopathic Parkinson’s disease. Patients with atypical parkinsonism are not candidates.
    • You have good motor function and independence during your best “on” state when taking the drug Sinemet.

    The Symptoms To Watch For

    Individuals with Parkinson’s disease will often experience symptoms differently. However, there are similarities in the main types of symptoms seen in this condition. These symptoms include tremors, slowness of movement , the stiffness of the trunk and limbs , and impaired coordination and balance . Patients may also experience the loss of automatic movements and changes in writing and speech.

    Tremors usually begin in the patient’s fingers or hands even when at rest. Their forefinger and thumb may rub each other in a ‘pill-rolling’ tremor. Bradykinesia results in tasks feeling more challenging and taking much longer to do. An individual’s steps may shorten, and their feet may drag. Stiff muscles can reduce the range of motion and cause pain. The patient’s posture may stoop, and balance may weaken when standing or walking. Speech changes may result in reduced volume, slurring, hesitating, or speaking too quickly. Writing may become difficult.

    Recommended Reading: What Are The Four Cardinal Signs Of Parkinson’s Disease

    Home Remedyfor Parkinsons #5 Vitamin D & Vitamin E:

    Inflammation and low immunity are two powerful factorsthat contribute to the development and worsening of Parkinsons disease. Bothvitamin D and vitamin E are strong anti-inflammatories and immune boosters. VitaminD & E also protect our brain cells and can even help damaged neurons regenerate. A deficiency of these key vitamins has also been linked to brain difficultiessuch as poor memory and recall attainability.

    In regards to PD, a study of 157 Parkinsons patientsfound that the vast majority of them had severe to chronic vitamin Ddeficiencies. The findings, published in the Archives of Neurology in March of 2011, revealed a strong linkbetween inadequate levels of vitamin D and the onset of early Parkinson’sdisease.4

    Back in 2002, another study was published in the Archives of Neurology which tracked themental decline of 3,000 men and women diagnosed with Parkinsons disease over a period of 7 years. The study found the participants whose supplemental vitamin E intakewas higher experienced a 36% reduction in theseverity of their symptoms compared to the rest of the group. Another study, whichappeared in the Lancet Neurology onlinemagazine in 2005, showed that vitamin E may actually prevent Parkinsonsdisease from developing in the first place! 8

    Where to Get Your Vitamin D and Vitamin E From?

    Related Diagnosis: Lewy Body Dementia

    Dealing with Parkinsons Disease

    Current research is helping to differentiate dementia related conditions in relationship to Parkinsonâs disease. Doctorâs use a 12-month arbitrary rule to aid in diagnosis. When dementia is present before or within 1 year of Parkinsonâs motor symptoms developing, an individual is diagnosed with DLB. Those who have an existing diagnosis of Parkinsonâs for more than a year, and later develop dementia, are diagnosed with PDD.

    In the simplest terms, Lewy bodies are abnormal clumps of proteins that develop in nerve cells. Cholinesterase inhibitors, medications originally developed for Alzheimerâs disease, are the standard treatment today for cognitive DLB and PDD symptoms. Early diagnosis is important, as DLB patients may respond differently than Alzheimerâs disease patients to certain drug, behavioral, and dementia care treatments.

    This challenging, multi-system disorder involving movement, cognition, behavior, sleep, and autonomic function requires a comprehensive treatment approach to maximize the quality of life for both the care recipient and their caregiver. It is very important to pay attention to symptoms of dementia and to search for an expert clinician who can diagnose the condition accurately.

    Also Check: Can Parkinson’s Run In The Family

    Learn More About How Parkinsons Affects Families & Relationships

    Much more can be found in a powerful new edition of Davis Phinney Foundations free Every Victory Counts® manual. The Every Victory Counts manual has an entire section on Parkinsons and the family along with tools care partners may find useful along their caregiving journey.

    Its jam-packed with up-to-date information about everything Parkinsons, plus an expanded worksheets and resources section to help you put what youve learned into action. Color coding and engaging graphics help guide you through the written material and point you to complementary videos, podcasts and other materials on the Every Victory Counts companion website. And, it is still free of charge thanks to the generosity of our sponsors.

    Request your copy of the new Every Victory Counts manual by clicking the button below.

    What Types Of Help Are Available For Parkinson’s Disease

    There are many types of help available for people with Parkinson’s disease. Among them are:

    • Support groups: Support groups are very useful for sharing experiences. They provide an environment where you can learn new ways of dealing with your illness. You may want to share approaches you have discovered with others. You will also gain strength in knowing that you are not facing hardships alone.
    • Individual counseling: Sometimes people have problems that are better addressed in a one-on-one atmosphere. By participating in individual counseling, you may more effectively express sensitive or private feelings you have about your illness and its impact on your lifestyle and relationships.

    Recommended Reading: What Is The Life Expectancy Of Someone With Parkinson’s Disease

    Dealing With Parkinson’s Disease: A Guide For Patients And Families

    Parkinson’s disease is an ongoing, progressive disease of the nervous system that affects a patient’s movement. Millions of individuals worldwide are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. The cause of Parkinson’s disease is presently not known. However, research attributes the disease to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Age also plays a role. Most cases of Parkinson’s disease beginning after an individual is sixty years old.

    Unfortunately, there is currently no Parkinson’s disease cure. There are, however, treatments for Parkinson’s disease. Many patients take Parkinson’s disease medications to control their symptoms. Occupational therapy is also a huge part of treating Parkinson’s disease. Overall, this condition requires intense treatment and symptom management for patients to live a full life.

    Diagnosis Of Parkinsons Disease

    Parkinson Power: Deal with Depression

    A number of disorders can cause symptoms similar to those of Parkinson’s disease. People with Parkinson’s-like symptoms that result from other causes are sometimes said to have parkinsonism. While these disorders initially may be misdiagnosed as Parkinson’s, certain medical tests, as well as response to drug treatment, may help to distinguish them from Parkinson’s. Since many other diseases have similar features but require different treatments, it is important to make an exact diagnosis as soon as possible.

    There are currently no blood or laboratory tests to diagnose nongenetic cases of Parkinson’s disease. Diagnosis is based on a person’s medical history and a neurological examination. Improvement after initiating medication is another important hallmark of Parkinson’s disease.

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    How Is Parkinsons Disease Treated

    There is no cure for Parkinsons disease. However, medications and other treatments can help relieve some of your symptoms. Exercise can help your Parkinsons symptoms significantly. In addition, physical therapy, occupational therapy and speech-language therapy can help with walking and balance problems, eating and swallowing challenges and speech problems. Surgery is an option for some patients.

    Lifestyle And Home Treatments

    Doctors will help patients find an appropriate treatment plan, often involving medication, that helps relieve symptoms with the fewest side effects. However, living with Parkinson’s disease can be made quite a bit easier with specific lifestyle changes. A healthy, balanced diet high in fiber and fluids can help relieve symptoms such as constipation. Omega-3 fatty acids may also beneficial for Parkinson’s disease patients. Exercising will help reduce emotional disturbances, such as depression and anxiety, and help improve balance.

    Daily living activities can be difficult for individuals dealing with Parkinson’s disease. Thus, they should see an occupational therapist who can teach them techniques to help make life easier. Lifestyle changes, furthermore, are also something family members can also join in on with no worries as to side effects. However, they must follow the recommended guidelines from doctors as well. This kind of participation can provide invaluable support to the Parkinson’s disease patient.

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    How Parkinsons Could Affect Your Partner/spouse

    When you are married or involved in a committed relationship, Parkinsons disease is something that happens to both of you.

    Having Parkinsons can change the dynamics of the relationship, the family, and both partners career roles and responsibilities.

    In addition to the movement symptoms associated with Parkinsons, non-motor symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and sexual dysfunction can occur. It is not unusual for relationships to become strained due to the stress of being diagnosed or living with PD. Sometimes, the biggest challenge is to remain open to one another at a time when you may feel more inclined to shut down. If you can find the courage to be honest and vulnerable with one another about your fears and worries both now and in the future, your partnership may become stronger than before.

    If you find that you are having trouble communicating about the changes that may be occurring in your life and your relationship, it may be wise to work with a relationship counselor who can help you identify new or better ways of communicating and problem-solving together. Visit our new Young Onset Resource Guide for information and organizations that may be able to help you address relationship issues.

    APDA Publications

    Home Safety Considerations For Parkinsons Disease

    Dealing With Parkinson

    Mobility problems are common symptoms of Parkinsons disease, therefore maximizing the safety and accessibility of a patients home is a top priority. Since seniors with PD often use mobility aids like canes, walkers, rollators or wheelchairs, wide, clear pathways in rooms and hallways are important. The following home elements can make it difficult for a person with limited mobility to get around their home safely.

    Read Also: Can Parkinson’s Run In The Family

    Medicines For Parkinson’s Disease

    Medicines prescribed for Parkinson’s include:

    • Drugs that increase the level of dopamine in the brain
    • Drugs that affect other brain chemicals in the body
    • Drugs that help control nonmotor symptoms

    The main therapy for Parkinson’s is levodopa, also called L-dopa. Nerve cells use levodopa to make dopamine to replenish the brain’s dwindling supply. Usually, people take levodopa along with another medication called carbidopa. Carbidopa prevents or reduces some of the side effects of levodopa therapysuch as nausea, vomiting, low blood pressure, and restlessnessand reduces the amount of levodopa needed to improve symptoms.

    People with Parkinson’s should never stop taking levodopa without telling their doctor. Suddenly stopping the drug may have serious side effects, such as being unable to move or having difficulty breathing.

    Other medicines used to treat Parkinsons symptoms include:

    • Dopamine agonists to mimic the role of dopamine in the brain
    • MAO-B inhibitors to slow down an enzyme that breaks down dopamine in the brain
    • COMT inhibitors to help break down dopamine
    • Amantadine, an old antiviral drug, to reduce involuntary movements
    • Anticholinergic drugs to reduce tremors and muscle rigidity

    What Is The Outlook For Persons With Parkinsons Disease

    Although there is no cure or absolute evidence of ways to prevent Parkinsons disease, scientists are working hard to learn more about the disease and find innovative ways to better manage it, prevent it from progressing and ultimately curing it.

    Currently, you and your healthcare teams efforts are focused on medical management of your symptoms along with general health and lifestyle improvement recommendations . By identifying individual symptoms and adjusting the course of action based on changes in symptoms, most people with Parkinsons disease can live fulfilling lives.

    The future is hopeful. Some of the research underway includes:

    • Using stem cells to produce new neurons, which would produce dopamine.
    • Producing a dopamine-producing enzyme that is delivered to a gene in the brain that controls movement.
    • Using a naturally occurring human protein glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor, GDNF to protect dopamine-releasing nerve cells.

    Many other investigations are underway too. Much has been learned, much progress has been made and additional discoveries are likely to come.

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    Bathing And Personal Care Tips

    For someone with Parkinsons disease, showering is typically preferred to taking baths because getting in and out of the tub becomes increasingly difficult. However, some people with PD may eventually experience changes in the brain that affect memory, judgement and focus. The Alzheimers Association estimates that 50 to 80 percent of Parkinsons patients experience these and other symptoms of dementia. Individuals living with Parkinsons disease dementia and Lewy body dementia may benefit from some adaptations, assistive devices and caregiving techniques that are used in dementia care.

    For example, many dementia patients are confused or even frightened by the sound and feel of running water while showering. If your loved one requires assistance with bathing, be sure to give them time to adapt to the situation and understand what is happening. Gently talk them through the process, ensure they are warm and comfortable, and start by cleansing less sensitive areas of the body, such as the feet and hands, before proceeding to other areas.

    Read:Bathing Tips and Techniques for Dementia Caregivers

    What Is Parkinson’s Disease

    Parkinson Power How to Deal with Speech & Swallowing Problems

    Parkinsons disease occurs when brain cells that make dopamine, a chemical that coordinates movement, stop working or die. Because PD can cause tremor, slowness, stiffness, and walking and balance problems, it is called a movement disorder. But constipation, depression, memory problems and other non-movement symptoms also can be part of Parkinsons. PD is a lifelong and progressive disease, which means that symptoms slowly worsen over time.

    The experience of living with Parkinson’s over the course of a lifetime is unique to each person. As symptoms and progression vary from person to person, neither you nor your doctor can predict which symptoms you will get, when you will get them or how severe they will be. Even though broad paths of similarity are observed among individuals with PD as the disease progresses, there is no guarantee you will experience what you see in others.

    Parkinsons affects nearly 1 million people in the United States and more than 6 million people worldwide.

    For an in-depth guide to navigating Parkinsons disease and living well as the disease progresses, check out our Parkinsons 360 toolkit.

    What Is Parkinson’s Disease?

    Dr. Rachel Dolhun, a movement disorder specialist and vice president of medical communications at The Michael J. Fox Foundation, breaks down the basics of Parkinson’s.

    Read Also: What Is The Life Expectancy Of Someone With Parkinson’s Disease

    How Do I Prevent Falls From Common Hazards

    • Floors: Remove all loose wires, cords, and throw rugs. Minimize clutter. Make sure rugs are anchored and smooth. Keep furniture in its usual place.
    • Bathroom: Install grab bars and non-skid tape in the tub or shower. Use non-skid bath mats on the floor or install wall-to-wall carpeting.
    • Lighting: Make sure halls, stairways, and entrances are well-lit. Install a night light in your bathroom or hallway and staircase. Turn lights on if you get up in the middle of the night. Make sure lamps or light switches are within reach of the bed if you have to get up during the night.
    • Kitchen: Install non-skid rubber mats near the sink and stove. Clean spills immediately.
    • Stairs: Make sure treads, rails, and rugs are secure. Install a rail on both sides of the stairs. If stairs are a threat, it might be helpful to arrange most of your activities on the lower level to reduce the number of times you must climb the stairs.
    • Entrances and doorways: Install metal handles on the walls adjacent to the doorknobs of all doors to make it more secure as you travel through the doorway.

    Impulsive And Compulsive Behaviour

    Some patients who take dopamine agonists can experience problems controlling impulsive or compulsive behaviour .

    Impulsive behaviour refers to the inability of patients to resist carrying out certain activities, some of these activities could be harmful to themselves or others. In many cases, this behaviour is out of character.

    Compulsive behaviour refers to an overwhelming urge to act in a certain way to reduce the worry or tension this urge produces. This behaviour can be expressed in a number of ways, including addictive gambling, impulsive shopping, binge eating and hypersexuality.

    Nurses who suspect a patient might be experiencing compulsive or impulsive behaviour should discuss the issue with the patient and the patients neurologist or GP as soon as possible.

    Read Also: 10 Early Signs Of Parkinson’s Disease That Doctors Often Miss

    Naturaltreatment For Parkinsons #6 Magnesium & Iodine:

    Magnesium is vital for the health of the entire nervoussystem, especially the protective layer that surrounds the nerves . Magnesiumis also essential for the production of dopamine and helps protect dopaminergicneurons in the substantia nigra from degeneration. In addition to this, new evidence is showing that low levels of magnesium in the brain causes a build-up ofheavy metals a major factor in the development of Parkinsons, Alzheimers,epilepsy and MS. In a recent trial, 30 epileptics were given 450 mg ofmagnesium daily and this successfully controlled their seizures. Ifmagnesium can help epilepsy patients, it can certainly help Parkinsons sufferers. Worldrenowned magnesium expert and author, Dr Carolyn Dean, has both Parkinsons andAlzheimers disease in her top 55 health conditions caused by amagnesium deficiency list and says that magnesium is 100% essential for the preventionand treatment of both of these diseases Dr Carolyn Dean Interview

    In regards to iodine, well-known researcher and author,Dr James Howenstein, says

    Iodineis found in large quantities in the brain and the ciliary body of the eye. A lackof iodine may be involved in the production of Parkinson’s disease andglaucoma.

    Inthe brain, iodine concentrates in the substantia nigra, an area of the brainthat has been associated with Parkinson’s disease.

    David Brownstein M.D. 9

    Best Sources of Magnesium and Iodine

    -What Youll Need

    1 cup of Magnesium Chloride Flakes

    1 cup of Distilled Water

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