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Thursday, June 16, 2022
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How My Parkinson’s Started

What Causes Parkinsons Disease

My Parkinsons Story: Atypical

Parkinsons disease occurs when nerve cells in an area of the brain called the substantia nigra become impaired or die. These cells normally produce dopamine, a chemical that helps the cells of the brain communicate . When these nerve cells become impaired or die, they produce less dopamine. Dopamine is especially important for the operation of another area of the brain called the basal ganglia. This area of the brain is responsible for organizing the brains commands for body movement. The loss of dopamine causes the movement symptoms seen in people with Parkinsons disease.

People with Parkinsons disease also lose another neurotransmitter called norepinephrine. This chemical is needed for proper functioning of the sympathetic nervous system. This system controls some of the bodys autonomic functions such as digestion, heart rate, blood pressure and breathing. Loss of norepinephrine causes some of the non-movement-related symptoms of Parkinsons disease.

Scientists arent sure what causes the neurons that produce these neurotransmitter chemicals to die.

What Are The Different Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

Each person with Parkinsons disease experiences symptoms in in their own unique way. Not everyone experiences all symptoms of Parkinsons disease. You may not experience symptoms in the same order as others. Some people may have mild symptoms; others may have intense symptoms. How quickly symptoms worsen also varies from individual to individual and is difficult to impossible to predict at the outset.

In general, the disease progresses from early stage to mid-stage to mid-late-stage to advanced stage. This is what typically occurs during each of these stages:

Early stage

Early symptoms of Parkinsons disease are usually mild and typically occur slowly and do not interfere with daily activities. Sometimes early symptoms are not easy to detect or you may think early symptoms are simply normal signs of aging. You may have fatigue or a general sense of uneasiness. You may feel a slight tremor or have difficulty standing.

Often, a family member or friend notices some of the subtle signs before you do. They may notice things like body stiffness or lack of normal movement slow or small handwriting, lack of expression in your face, or difficulty getting out of a chair.

Mid stage

Mid-late stage

Standing and walking are becoming more difficult and may require assistance with a walker. You may need full time help to continue to live at home.

Advanced stage

Parkinson’s Disease Is Difficult To Diagnose

Parkinson’s is a challenge to diagnose since there is no definitive test for it. Blood tests and scans are usually run just to rule out other causes of the symptoms.

If a GP suspects a patient could have Parkinson’s, they may refer them to a neurologist who can make a diagnosis based on medical history, a review of the signs and symptoms and a physical examination. It can help to keep a diary of symptoms leading up to the appointment.

Diagnosing Parkinson’s disease in some people can be a long process.

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Can You Die From Parkinson’s

Advanced symptoms of a long-term condition like Parkinsons can make people more vulnerable to poor health and increased disability. These complications can sometimes result in someone dying. When this happens, Parkinsons can be recorded as a cause of death.

Complications can include:

  • aspiration pneumonia
  • falls
  • chest infections and pneumonia;

This is one of the reasons why its important to manage your condition as well as you can, with the support of specialist healthcare professionals.; ;

Trouble Moving Or Walking

World Parkinson

Do you feel stiff in your body, arms or legs? Have others noticed that your arms dont swing like they used to when you walk? Sometimes stiffness goes away as you move. If it does not, it can be a sign of Parkinson’s disease. An early sign might be stiffness or pain in your shoulder or hips. People sometimes say their feet seem stuck to the floor.

What is normal?If you have injured your arm or shoulder, you may not be able to use it as well until it is healed, or another illness like arthritis might cause the same symptom.

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Who Gets Early Onset Parkinsons Disease

About 10%-20% of those diagnosed with Parkinsons disease are under age 50, and about half of those are diagnosed before age 40. Approximately 60,000 new cases of Parkinsons are diagnosed each year in the United States, meaning somewhere around 6,000 12,000 are young onset patients.

Is it genetic or hereditary?

The cause of Parkinsons disease is not yet known. However, Parkinsons disease has appeared across several generations of some families, which could indicate that certain forms of the disease are hereditary or genetic. Many researchers think that Parkinsons disease may be caused by genetic factors combined with other external factors. The field of genetics is playing an ever greater role in Parkinsons disease research, and scientists are continually working towards determining the cause or causes of PD.

Do People Actually Lose Their Sense Of Smell With Parkinson’s

A: Yes. It’s a condition called anosmia, and if you have it with no other disease , you have at least a 50 percent chance of developing Parkinson’s disease in the next five to 10 years. What happens is that alpha-synuclein, the protein that clumps in the part of the brain that regulates dopamine and leads to Parkinson’s disease, also aggregates in the olfactory bulb, the part of the brain responsible for your sense of smell. This happens well before the protein accumulations cause motor symptoms.

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Early Onset/young Onset Parkinson’s

Parkinsons can occur at any;age. Early onset Parkinson’s, also known as young onset Parkinsons , is defined as occurring in someone below the age of 40. Research suggests that genetics may play more of a role in early or young onset than in people who are diagnosed over the age of 40.

In early or young onset Parkinson’s,;the symptoms you experience and how you respond to medication may differ slightly from older onset, although for some people these can be very similar.

Motor symptoms generally respond well to medication in both young;and older onset Parkinsons. In early or young onset,;motor fluctuations such as;dyskinesia; and;wearing off; tend to occur earlier but they generally progress more slowly. This is thought to be due to the most commonly prescribed medication, levodopa, and for this reason, young onset;is usually treated initially with alternatives to levodopa such as MAO-B inhibitors or dopamine agonists.;Levodopa is generally only added in when other medications do not provide adequate symptom control.;

Dystonia; is also a more common early motor symptom in early or young onset, whereas some of the non-motor symptoms that occur in older onset Parkinsons, such as memory problems, are less common.

Deep brain stimulation has also been shown to be effective at an earlier stage of Parkinsons if medication no longer controls motor symptoms so well, and you may want to discuss this option with your care team. See;Deep brain stimulation.

Fighting Parkinson’s Drug Free

Faces of Parkinson’s

Fighting Parkinson’s Drug Free shares with you what I did to recover from Parkinson’s Disease without medications or supplements by using a holistic approach that I developed. My story is chronicled on my web site. Since Mar 2010 Also infightingparkinsonsdrugfree.c.. 690 256 1 post / week View Latest PostsGet Email Contact

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At That Point I Had A Running List Of Symptoms That Got Longer Each Day

My face felt stiff and I slurred my words and blanked out in the middle of sentences. I felt off-balance, rigid, and slow-moving. Sometimes I froze between steps. I could feel my body trembling inside and out. I was extremely fatigued, but I struggled to fall and stay asleep at night. I lost my sense of taste and smell. According to a cardiologist, I also had orthostatic hypotension, a form of low blood pressure that makes you feel dizzy when you stand up and can sometimes indicate deeper health issues.

Id always been such a happy person, but people around me were starting to notice something was wrong. My employer at the time even told me Id lost my sparkle and had slowed down too much at school. Hearing this broke my heart.

After doing my own research, I feared I may have Parkinsons disease , a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects dopamine-producing neurons in a part of the brain that affects multiple functions, including movement and cognition. I couldnt fathom how this could be possible when so few young women were diagnosed with Parkinsons, but I needed to know why I had so little energy I could no longer go on field trips with my youngest son.

Early Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive disease of the nervous system that affects movement. Approximately 1 million people in the U.S. are living with the disease. This year, about 60,000 more will be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.

Many people associate Parkinson’s disease with tremors or shaking of their hands. While this is a common symptom, other important symptoms include stiffness of muscles and slowing of movement.

Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease usually start on one side of the body. They usually remain worse on that side even after symptoms begin to affect both sides.

The early signs and symptoms are different for each person. The symptoms may be mild enough to go unnoticed for months or years.

Here are early symptoms that can raise concern for Parkinson’s disease:

  • Smaller handwriting
  • Family members may observe that one arm swings less on one side when walking.
  • Soft or low voice Again, it is family members or friends who may ask one to speak louder. The speech may be more of a monotone without the usual inflections.

It is the combination of several symptoms that would raise suspicion for Parkinson’s disease. A single symptom is not enough to make a diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease.

It is important to talk with your health care provider if you have any of the symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease. This is to properly diagnose the condition and rule out other conditions with similar symptoms.

Leonardo Fugoso, M.D., is a neurologist;in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

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The American Parkinson Disease Association

The American Parkinson Disease Association is the largest grassroots network dedicated to fighting Parkinson’s disease . A Closer Look by Dr. Rebecca Gilbert aims to address both timely and timeless topics related to Parkinson’s disease . In addition, we focus on practical, take-home tips that can be gleaned from the information discussed. We encourage you to subscribe to the blog and suggest blog topics. apdaparkinson.org/doctor-blo.. 13.8K 3.2K 1 post / week View Latest PostsGet Email Contact

Parkinsons Recovery is a clearinghouse of information about treatments and therapies for persons diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. This blog is to provide support, information and resources to families with a member currently experiencing the symptoms of Parkinsons. blog.parkinsonsrecovery.com 288 2 posts / month View Latest PostsGet Email Contact

A blog for Parkinson’s education, research advances, new treatment strategies, and personal reflection: the goal is to provide support and information/resources to anyone with Parkinson’s. journeywithparkinsons.com 443 2 posts / week View Latest PostsGet Email Contact

What You Can Do

How to get rid of Parkinsons Disease?

As of 2021, there is no definite cure for Parkinsons disease. There is also no definite known cause. Its likely due to a combination of an individuals susceptibility and environmental factors. Most cases of Parkinsons disease happen without a genetic link.

According to research published in 2012, only report having a family member with the disease. Many toxins are suspected and have been studied, but no single substance can be reliably linked to Parkinsons.

However, research is ongoing. Its estimated that

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What Helps Parkinsons Disease

There is no official cure for Parkinsons Disease.

As the disease progresses, patients often suffer from cognitive decline. Existing treatments can help ease symptoms, but over time, the drugs themselves can cause debilitating side effects.

Carbidopa is most commonly used for Parkinsons disease. However, there can be a number of negative side effects and problems associated with the administration of carbidopa during treatment of Parkinsons disease. This is thought to be because the administration of carbidopa will deplete the body of vitamin B-6, l-tyrosine, l-tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan , serotonin, and sulfur amino acids.

The properly balanced administration of Mucuna pruriens , and not carbidopa, in conjunction with 5-HTP, l-tyrosine, l-cysteine, and other supportive nutritional supplements can improve symptoms.

A research study, led by Dr. Marty Hinz and printed in the International Journal of Internal Medicine, was done with 254 Parkinsons patients who were newly diagnosed with no previous treatment and those who were diagnosed more than 20 years before and had tried many other medical treatment options. It showed that these supplements were helpful in the treatment of Parkinsons Disease.

How Do Symptoms Progress

The most common symptoms of;Parkinson’s are tremor, rigidity and slowness of movement.

Not everyone with Parkinson’s experiences the same combination of symptoms they vary from person to person.

Also, how Parkinson’s affects someone can change from day to day, and even from hour to hour. Symptoms that may be noticeable one day may not be a problem the next.

Many of the symptoms can be treated or managed with medication and therapies.

Many people with Parkinson’s lead active and fulfilling lives. An important part of coping with Parkinson’s is understanding how it affects you and how to work around it.

It may not always be easy to maintain a positive outlook, especially immediately after diagnosis. But we can give you help and support.

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Caregiving For People Living With Parkinsons

Caring for a loved one with PD can be a challenging job, especially as the disease progresses. Former caregivers of a loved one with PD suggest doing the following : Get prepared, Take care of yourself, Get help , Work to maintain a good relationship with your loved one, and Encourage the person with PD for whom you care, to stay active.

Preparing for caregiving starts with education. Reading this fact sheet is a good start. More resources are available to you in theResources section of this fact sheet. Early Parkinson√Ęs disease usually requires more emotional support and less hands-on care. It is a good time for family members/caregivers to educate themselves about the disease.

Im 35 With Two Young Children And Parkinsons

People over the world talk about their Parkinson’s

At 29, Ellie Finch Hulme was diagnosed with a condition often associated with much older people – Parkinson’s disease. She decided it wasn’t going to stop her living her life the way she wanted to.

Ellie doesn’t fit the stereotype of someone with Parkinson’s disease, as one of her recent tweets makes clear.

One 35-year-oldTwo kids, aged 4 and 2Three different medicationsFive years living with #parkinsonsAnd I don’t even look like your neighbour’s friend’s gran.

People are often shocked when they meet her for the first time, she says.

“I volunteer in a local charity shop occasionally around the kids and around my work and if I’m trembling, if I have to wrap something up – because anything can set off your tremor – someone will say something like, ‘Is it your first day here?’ And I’ll be like, ‘No, I’ve got Parkinson’s.'”

They expect someone with Parkinson’s to be white-haired and stooping, but Ellie, who lives in Farnham in Surrey, has young onset Parkinson’s disease, and was diagnosed before she was 30.

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What If You Have Parkinson’s

After Parkinson’s is diagnosed, your doctor will help you develop an individualized plan to address the symptoms that have the biggest impact on your everyday life and help slow down the progression of the disease. The first step is getting a referral to a neurologist for expert care especially one who is trained in movement disorders.

Studies Of Patients With Non

The Parkinsons Associated Risk Study is an ongoing large study whose goal is to evaluate specific tests for their ability to predict an increased risk of PD.; The ultimate goal is to find a set of tests that can predict the future development of PD. The study has evaluated smell tests, questionnaires that probe mood, bowel habits and sleep disorders, as well as the dopamine transporter imaging test, commonly referred to as DaTscan.

A DaTscan involves injecting a small amount of a radioactive tracer into the bloodstream. The tracer makes its way into the brain and binds to the dopamine transporters, which are molecules on the surface of the dopamine neurons. In PD, there are fewer of these neurons and therefore there is less uptake of the tracer in the brain. A brain scan then determines if the amount of uptake of the tracer is normal or decreased. Currently, this test is approved to distinguish between PD and a neurologic condition known as essential tremor, a tremor disorder which is not caused by an abnormality of the dopamine system.

DaTscan is not yet approved to determine if patients who are experiencing only the non-motor symptoms of PD, in fact have PD. However, it is known that a DaTscan can be abnormal even before motor symptoms are present. The PARS study is investigating whether in the future, a DaTscan can be part of an algorithm to determine who is at risk of developing PD.

Tips and takeaways

Dr. Rebecca Gilbert

APDA Vice President and Chief Scientific Officer

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Consideration #: What’s Your Personality

Physical Therapy & Personal Training – You prefer 1-on-1, individualized attention. Here you get feedback about your form and guidance on an intensity level that’s specific to you, your body, and your health status.

Group Fitness Classes – You prefer the “tribal” feel and camaraderie of working out in a group. You’re okay with general guidance on form and intensity.

Online Programs – You like to be able to workout on your own schedule or from home . You’re relatively self-motivated and don’t feel like you need individual support.

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