Wednesday, November 30, 2022
Wednesday, November 30, 2022
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Does Parkinson’s Disease Shorten Your Life

What Is Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

New Frontiers in Parkinson’s Disease Research and Care

Progressive supranuclear palsy or Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder that damages your brain and affects how you walk, think, swallow and move your eyes. It may also cause a number of other symptoms. PSP is often confused with Parkinsons disease. There is no proven cure or disease-modifying treatment.

Neurodegenerative refers to the collapse of your nervous system, especially the death of neurons and gia in your brain. Progressive means that the symptoms get worse over time and palsy means that the disorder impairs your eye movements. Supranuclear refers to the damage localized above the eye-moving centers in your brain.

How Old Do You Have To Be To Get Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons disease is known as an older persons disease since it is most often diagnosed in people over age 60. Only 4 percent of all cases are diagnosed before age 50. PD is the second most common age-related nerve degenerating disease after Alzheimers. The incidence of PD is 1 percent of the population over the age of 60.

What Can I Expect If Ive Been Diagnosed With Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Your symptoms will slowly worsen with time. PSP cant be reversed, and it cant be cured. However, the sooner the diagnosis is made and a treatment plan is put into place, the better your quality of life will be.

Most patients with PSP become wheelchair-bound. They may need part or full time care as early as three to four years into the disease. This depends on the person.

Unfortunately, in the long-term, complications of the disease can be fatal. PSP wont directly kill you, but it is deadly. Common complications include choking, pneumonia, fractures and head injuries .

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Identifying Risk Factors For Parkinson’s

The risk for early death increased by about 40% for every 10-year increase in age at diagnosis.

Parkinsonâs researcher Tobias Kurth, MD, agrees that identifying risk factors for early death could help clinicians better manage the disease.

Kurth is an adjunct associate professor of epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health.

âThis is important research that adds to our understanding of the impact of specific features of Parkinsonâs disease on outcomes,â he tells WebMD.

His own study of Parkinsonâs-associated death matched Parkinsonâs patients with people without the disease who had similar non-Parkinsonâs-related illnesses.

Like the newly reported study, patients who were older when their Parkinsonâs disease was diagnosed had a greater risk for early death.

Parkinson’s Disease Diet And Nutrition

Does Parkinsons affect life expectancy? After learning ...

Maintaining Your Weight With Parkinson’s Disease

Malnutrition and weight maintenance is often an issue for people with Parkinson’s disease. Here are some tips to help you maintain a healthy weight.

  • Weigh yourself once or twice a week, unless your doctor recommends weighing yourself often. If you are taking diuretics or steroids, such as prednisone, you should weigh yourself daily.
  • If you have an unexplained weight gain or loss , contact your doctor. He or she may want to modify your food or fluid intake to help manage your condition.
  • Avoid low-fat or low-calorie products. . Use whole milk, whole milk cheese, and yogurt.

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The 5 Stages Of Parkinsons Disease

Getting older is underrated by most. Its a joyful experience to sit back, relax and watch the people in your life grow up, have kids of their own and flourish. Age can be a beautiful thing, even as our bodies begin to slow down. We spoke with David Shprecher, DO, movement disorders director at Banner Sun Health Research Institute about a well-known illness which afflicts as many as 2% of people older than 65, Parkinsons Disease.

Caregiving For People Living With Parkinsons

Caring for a loved one with PD can be a challenging job, especially as the disease progresses. Former caregivers of a loved one with PD suggest doing the following : Get prepared, Take care of yourself, Get help , Work to maintain a good relationship with your loved one, and Encourage the person with PD for whom you care, to stay active.

Preparing for caregiving starts with education. Reading this fact sheet is a good start. More resources are available to you in theResources section of this fact sheet. Early Parkinsonâs disease usually requires more emotional support and less hands-on care. It is a good time for family members/caregivers to educate themselves about the disease.

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What Is The Difference Between Progressive Supranuclear Palsy And Parkinsons Disease

PSP frequently resembles Parkinsons disease, often making it difficult to distinguish these conditions from one another. Both cause difficulty with stiffness and clumsiness. Both cause slow movement and start later in life. And both show damage to the same areas of the brain that affect movement. In particular, PSP-P can be nearly indistinguishable from Parkinsons disease by clinical examination.

But, PSP and Parkinsons disease are different in several ways. On average, PSP gets worse quicker than Parkinsons and doesnt respond as well to medications. People with Parkinsons usually bend forward, while people with PSP stand very straight, or even slightly backwards. Problems with swallowing and with speaking appear early with PSP and they are far more severe. A tremor is rare with people who have PSP and common in people who have Parkinsons. Motor symptoms, such as slowing and loss of dexterity, typically start very asymmetrically in Parkinsons disease .

Additionally, their underlying pathological processes differ at the molecular level. Abnormalities relating to the protein tau and its effect on brain cells is central to PSP pathology. And, when looked at through a microscope, the damaged brain cells in someone with PSP look different than those of people who have Parkinsons.

Complementary And Supportive Therapies

Parkinson Disease: Treatment by a Physical Therapist

A wide variety of complementary and supportive therapies may be used for PD, including:

A healthy diet. At this time there are no specific vitamins, minerals, or other nutrients that have any proven therapeutic value in PD. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and other components of the National Institutes of Health are funding research to determine if caffeine, antioxidants, and other dietary factors may be beneficial for preventing or treating PD. A normal, healthy diet can promote overall well-being for people with PD just as it would for anyone else. Eating a fiber-rich diet and drinking plenty of fluids also can help alleviate constipation. A high protein diet, however, may limit levodopas absorption.

Exercise. Exercise can help people with PD improve their mobility, flexibility, and body strength. It also can improve well-being, balance, minimize gait problems, and strengthen certain muscles so that people can speak and swallow better. General physical activity, such as walking, gardening, swimming, calisthenics, and using exercise machines, can have other benefit. People with PD should always check with their doctors before beginning a new exercise program.

Alternative approaches that are used by some individuals with PD include:

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Overview Of The Problem

Parkinsons disease indicates a progressive disease and it means it will become worse with the passage of time. In fact, it is a type of neurological disorder and it starts with a few tremors and movement slowness, but it gradually leads to postural instability. During the later stages of the problem, tremors and various other similar symptoms become debilitating to a huge extent.

While the exact cause of Parkinsons disease is unknown among doctors, they perceive the disease has its roots in combination of varying genetics and fluctuations in different environmental factors. However, doctors are aware with two main aspects associated with the problem i.e. it takes place at onset of 60 years and more than 5 millions of people worldwide succeed to stay alive even by suffering from mild or moderate Parkinsons problem, while a few of them even leading a good life with advanced stage of the disease.

The Role Of Dementia And Age

Dementia also plays an important role in survival with Parkinson’s. By the end of the above study, nearly 70% of the population with Parkinson’s had been diagnosed with dementia, and those with dementia had a lower survival rate as compared to those without.

This means that those with dementia were more likely to die during the six-year period than those without dementia. In addition, scientific studies have shown that increasing age is linked to an increased risk of death.

It’s important to remember that how a person’s Parkinson’s disease manifests and progresses is variable, and a person’s neurologist cannot accurately predict individual life expectancy.

There are simply no key signs or symptoms that allow a doctor to perfectly predict longevity. An older age and the presence of dementia are simply associated with an increased risk of dying.

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Parkinsons Disease Is A Progressive Disorder

Parkinsons Disease is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects movement and, in some cases, cognition. Individuals with PD may have a slightly shorter life span compared to healthy individuals of the same age group. According to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinsons Research, patients usually begin developing Parkinsons symptoms around age 60. Many people with PD live between 10 and 20 years after being diagnosed. However, a patients age and general health status factor into the accuracy of this estimate.

While there is no cure for Parkinsons disease, many patients are only mildly affected and need no treatment for several years after their initial diagnosis. However, PD is both chronic, meaning it persists over a long period of time, and progressive, meaning its symptoms grow worse over time. This progression occurs more quickly in some people than in others.

Pharmaceutical and surgical interventions can help manage some of the symptoms, like bradykinesia , rigidity or tremor , but not much can be done to slow the overall progression of the disease. Over time, shaking, which affects most PD patients, may begin to interfere with daily activities and ones quality of life.

Quality Of Life Problems

Parkinson

While talking about quality of life, we should say that Parkinsons disease patients deal with the biggest health issue in the form of depression. This problem detracts patients from their abilities to lead a full and a happy life. Only thing that family members of depressed Parkinsons disease patients should do is to keep a proper track on different depression signs and make sure to schedule appointment with a doctor on a regular basis for necessary treatments.

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What Are The Symptoms Of The Disease

The four primary symptoms of PD are:

  • Tremor. Tremor often begins in a hand, although sometimes a foot or the jaw is affected first. The tremor associated with PD has a characteristic rhythmic back-and-forth motion that may involve the thumb and forefinger and appear as a pill rolling. It is most obvious when the hand is at rest or when a person is under stress. This tremor usually disappears during sleep or improves with a purposeful, intended movement.
  • Rigidity. Rigidity , or a resistance to movement, affects most people with PD. The muscles remain constantly tense and contracted so that the person aches or feels stiff. The rigidity becomes obvious when another person tries to move the individuals arm, which will move only in ratchet-like or short, jerky movements known as cogwheel rigidity.
  • Bradykinesia. This slowing down of spontaneous and automatic movement is particularly frustrating because it may make simple tasks difficult. The person cannot rapidly perform routine movements. Activities once performed quickly and easilysuch as washing or dressingmay take much longer. There is often a decrease in facial expressions.
  • Postural instability. Impaired balance and changes in posture can increase the risk of falls.

How Can People Cope With Parkinson’s Disease

While PD usually progresses slowly, eventually daily routines may be affectedfrom socializing with friends to earning a living and taking care of a home. These changes can be difficult to accept. Support groups can help people cope with the diseases emotional impact. These groups also can provide valuable information, advice, and experience to help people with PD, their families, and their caregivers deal with a wide range of issues, including locating doctors familiar with the disease and coping with physical limitations. A list of national organizations that can help people locate support groups in their communities appears at the end of this information. Individual or family counseling may also help people find ways to cope with PD.

People with PD may also benefit from being proactive and finding out as much as possible about the disease in order to alleviate fear of the unknown and to take a positive role in maintaining their health. Many people with PD continue to work either full- or part-time, although they may need to adjust their schedule and working environment to accommodate their symptoms.

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Effects Of Mini Stroke Can Shorten Life Expectancy

Date:
American Heart Association
Summary:
Having a transient ischemic attack , or mini stroke, could lower your life expectancy, according to new research. Survival rates after TIA were 20 percent lower than expected nine years later, compared to the general population. The long-term effects of TIA were most serious for patients older than 65 and for patients with previous history of stroke and heart problems.

Having a transient ischemic attack , or mini stroke, can reduce your life expectancy by 20 percent, according to a new study in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

People experiencing a TIA wont die from it, but they will have a high risk of early stroke and also an increased risk of future problems that may reduce life expectancy, said Melina Gattellari, Ph.D., senior lecturer at the School of Public Health and Community Medicine in The University of New South Wales, Sydney and Ingham Institute in Liverpool, Australia.

Our findings suggest that patients and doctors should be careful to intensely manage lifestyle and medical risk factors for years after a transient ischemic attack.

The statistical analysis is the first to comprehensively quantify the impact of hospital-diagnosed TIA on life expectancy.

Researchers also examined TIA patients medical records for other common health risks:

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How Serious Is Parkinsons

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Parkinsons disease does not directly cause people to die, but the condition can place great strain on the body, and can make some people more vulnerable to serious and life-threatening infections. But with advances in treatment, most people with Parkinsons disease now have a normal or near-normal life expectancy.

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Who Gets Parkinsons Disease

Risk factors for PD include:

  • Age. The average age of onset is about 70 years, and the incidence rises significantly with advancing age. However, a small percent of people with PD have early-onset disease that begins before the age of 50.
  • Sex. PD affects more men than women.
  • Heredity. People with one or more close relatives who have PD have an increased risk of developing the disease themselves. An estimated 15 to 25 percent of people with PD have a known relative with the disease. Some cases of the disease can be traced to specific genetic mutations.
  • Exposure to pesticides. Studies show an increased risk of PD in people who live in rural areas with increased pesticide use.

Using The Gds To Measure Dementia Progression

As the disease progresses, different signs and symptoms will become increasingly obvious. While there are several scales to measure the progression of dementia, the most common scale is the Global Deterioration Scale for Assessment of Primary Degenerative Dementia . The scale is also known as the Reisberg Scale. According to the GDS, there are seven different stages of Alzheimers disease correlating with four distinct categories: no Alzheimers, mild Alzheimers , moderate Alzheimers , and severe Alzheimers .

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Sex Differences: How Men And Women Experience Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons has not typically been thought of as being different for men and women, but the medical community is starting to recognize some possible sex differences in terms of symptoms and your overall experience with the condition. Motor and movement symptoms are generally the same for all genders. However, women may experience more anxiety, depression and other non-motor symptoms and may experience changes in their menstrual cycle with PD symptoms.10 Women may also experience some different side effects to medications.4 Theres still a lot physicians dont yet understand about sex differences, and more research is needed.

What Diseases And Conditions Resemble Parkinsons Disease

What Is Parkinsons Disease

PD is the most common form of parkinsonism, in which disorders of other causes produce features and symptoms that closely resemble Parkinsons disease. Many disorders can cause symptoms similar to those of PD, including:

Several diseases, including MSA, CBD, and PSP, are sometimes referred to as Parkinsons-plus diseases because they have the symptoms of PD plus additional features.

In very rare cases, parkinsonian symptoms may appear in people before the age of 20. This condition is called juvenile parkinsonism. It often begins with dystonia and bradykinesia, and the symptoms often improve with levodopa medication.

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What Is Parkinsons Disease Symptoms Causes Diagnosis Treatment And Prevention

The causes and symptoms of Parkinsons disease can vary from person to person. While there is no cure, there are medications and treatments to help manage the condition.

Parkinsons disease is a movement disorder that happens when nerve cells in a certain part of the brain are no longer making the chemical dopamine.

The condition is also sometimes known as paralysis agitans or shaking palsy.

The Parkinsons Foundation estimates that 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinsons every year. However, the true number of people who develop the disease may be much higher.

Do Symptoms Get Worse

PD does not affect everyone the same way. The rate of progression and the particular symptoms differ among individuals.

PD symptoms typically begin on one side of the body. However, the disease eventually affects both sides, although symptoms are often less severe on one side than on the other.

Early symptoms of PD may be subtle and occur gradually. Affected people may feel mild tremors or have difficulty getting out of a chair. Activities may take longer to complete than in the past. Muscles stiffen and movement may be slower. The persons face may lack expression and animation . People may notice that they speak too softly or with hesitation, or that their handwriting is slow and looks cramped or small. This very early period may last a long time before the more classical and obvious motor symptoms appear.

As the disease progresses, symptoms may begin to interfere with daily activities. Affected individuals may not be able to hold utensils steady or they may find that the shaking makes reading a newspaper difficult.

People with PD often develop a so-called parkinsonian gait that includes a tendency to lean forward, taking small quick steps as if hurrying , and reduced swinging in one or both arms. They may have trouble initiating movement , and they may stop suddenly as they walk .

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