Thursday, June 16, 2022
Thursday, June 16, 2022
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Why Do People Get Parkinson’s

What Role Do Genes Play

Why do people get Parkinson’s?

Your genes are like your body’s instruction book. So if you get a change in one of them, it can make your body work in a slightly different way. Sometimes, that means you’re more likely to get a certain disease.

There are several genetic mutations that can raise your risk for Parkinson’s, each by a little bit. They have a part in about 1 in 10 cases.

If you have one or more of these changes, it doesn’t mean you’ll get Parkinson’s. Some people will, but many won’t, and doctors don’t know why. It may have to do with other genes or something in your environment.

Treatment Options For Early Onset Parkinsons Disease

Parkinsons treatment aims to slow the diseases progression. Medication treatment options may include the following:

  • Levodopa is a chemical thats converted to dopamine in the brain. People with early onset Parkinsons may experience more negative side effects, such as involuntary movements.
  • MAO-B inhibitors can help reduce the breakdown of dopamine in the brain.
  • Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors can help extend Levodopas effects on the brain.
  • Anticholinergics can help reduce tremors.
  • Amantadine may be used to improve muscle control and relieve stiffness.

One Of The Most Difficult Neurological Disorder Symptoms Of Parkinsons

Why might this be important to families challenged by PD? Because the biggest source of conflict in families occurs when loved ones fail to recognize that a person with brain changes is not the same person who existed at an earlier time in life. Human beings greatly value continuity in personality but by expecting the person to be the same as they once were, loved ones are unfair to the person with brain insult. This person could no more return to an earlier personality state than he or she can will away tremors or rigidity. Energy expended in any way other than coming to terms with this new person is fruitless. There is actually some fascinating research in this area and it is likely to be a topic for a great deal more discussion in future blogs.

Because of the greater likelihood for executive dysfunction and dementia, personality change is easier to see among individuals with more advanced PD. Motivation is frequently affected, resulting in apathy that diminishes how actively an individual interacts with other people and with the world . Thinking or cognition changes can cause the person to process information more slowly and with less focus and concentration . A previously methodical, consistent individual often becomes increasingly chaotic in their response to their environment . One easily becomes less interested and hopeful about the future .

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One Of The First Studies To Look At Human Cells

The researchers used stem cells from patients with Parkinsons disease who had a mutation in the gene responsible for encoding the -synuclein protein.

At least 30 alterations in this gene have been associated with Parkinsons, and -synuclein protein clumps are a well-documented, albeit poorly understood, hallmark of the disease.

For the new research, the scientists also worked with normal embryonic cells that they modified using genetic editing to replicate the -synuclein genetic mutation.

Prof. Ryan explains why using human cells makes this study particularly valuable. Until now, he says, the link between pesticides and Parkinsons disease was based primarily on animal studies as well as epidemiological research that demonstrated an increased risk among farmers and others exposed to agricultural chemicals.

We are one of the first to investigate what is happening inside human cells, explains Prof. Ryan.

Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that go on to individualize into specific types of cells. Prof. Ryan and his colleagues used the two types of stem cells to derive dopamine-producing nerve cells from them.

Then, they exposed these dopaminergic neurons which are known to be affected the most by Parkinsons disease to the two pesticides.

Drug Therapy And Research

How Do People Get Parkinson

If the disease progresses beyond minor symptoms, drug treatment may be indicated. Drug therapy for Parkinsonâs typically provides relief for 10â15 years or more. The most commonly prescribed medication is L-dopa , and this helps replenish some of the depleted dopamine in the brain. Sinemet, a combination of levodopa and carbidopa, is the drug most doctors use to treat Parkinsonâs disease. Recent clinical studies have suggested, in the younger person, the class of drugs called âdopamine agonistsâ should be used prior to levodopa-carpidopa except in patients with cognitive problems or hallucinations. In those older than 75, dopamine agonists should be used cautiously because of an added risk of hallucinations.

Other drugs are also used, and new drugs are continually being tested. It is common for multiple drugs to be prescribed because many of them work well together to control symptoms and reduce side effects. Contrary to past beliefs, starting Sinemet in newly diagnosed people does not lead to early symptoms of dyskinesia . Current knowledge is that the disease progression causes dyskinesias, not a âresistanceâ to the drug.

Quality of life studies show that early treatment with dopaminergic medications improves daily functioning, prevents falls, and improves a personâs sense of well-being.

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How Were These Figures Calculated

We analysed anonymous medical records of over 2.5 million individuals over the age of 20 registered with GPs in the UK from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink database.

Clinical experts helped us assess the records to work out how many patients had a definite diagnosis of Parkinsons and then we adjusted the numbers to make sure they matched the UK population in terms of age profile and gender.

Finally, we used projected population figures from the Office of National Statistics, to estimate how many people have Parkinsons in 2018 and how many will go on to be diagnosed in 2025 and beyond.

The UK population is growing and people are living longer, which means that the number of people of people living with Parkinsons is expected to rise.

For more information, you can

What Are The Symptoms Of Parkinson Disease

Parkinson disease symptoms usually start out mild, and then progressively get much worse. The first signs are often so subtle that many people don’t seek medical attention at first. These are common symptoms of Parkinson disease:

  • Tremors that affect the face and jaw, legs, arms, and hands
  • Slow, stiff walking

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Take Care Of Yourself

Probably one of the most important, and sometimes difficult, things caregivers can do is to take care of themselves. This includes maintaining mental and physical health by making and keeping your own medical and dental appointments. As a caregiver, it is important to keep your job whenever possible as it provides not only financial help and possibly insurance coverage, but also a sense of self-esteem. Join a support group;for caregivers;if possible. Support groups help you meet people who are going through what you are going though, vent frustrations, give and receive mutual support, and exchange resource information and coping strategies. Whenever possible get your sleep, take breaks, make and keep social activities, and try to keep your sense of humor.

What Does It Mean To Have Parkinsons Disease

Movement Tips for People with Parkinson’s Disease

If your diagnosis turns positive for the Parkinsons disease, then do not worry, as you still have the chance to lead a productive life by making a alterations. If Parkinsons disease is detected in the early stages, then it is possible to keep the symptoms in check by controlling the food that you eat and with the aid of medicines. However, the effectiveness of the medication ceases over a period and produces side effects. There is a surgical method, called as deep brain stimulation , to cure the condition of Parkinsons disease. But, due to the high risks involved with the procedure, many patients or for that reason, a neurologist, never prefers the same to any patient. Choosing the operation is only useful for patients when the medicines do not show any effect, and the symptoms are worsening over the period.

After from controlling the food and consuming medicines, it is likewise meaningful to add exercises to the daily routine. It will help in keeping a check on the symptoms of Parkinsons disease.

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Potential Ways To Reduce Excessive Daytime Sleepiness

  • Assess the underlying cause
  • Improve nocturnal sleep through medications, cognitive behavioral therapy, diet, light therapy and more
  • Evaluate all medicines being takensome have hypersomnia as a side effectand adjust as needed
  • If taking dopaminergic medications, consider dose adjustment
  • Watch consumption of alcohol or sleep-inducing foods/ingredients
  • Experiment with caffeine

Meds That Improve Some Symptoms Can Exacerbate Others

SAN ANTONIO Roughly three out of four people living with Parkinsons disease also have sleep disorders, and there is growing recognition that sleep problems are greatly complicated by the disease, its symptoms, and the many medications used to treat it.

Sleep disorders are among the most common non-motor symptoms in PD, and sleep is something clinicians have to continually monitor when considering medication dosing, Scott Kutscher, MD, of Stanford School of Medicine in California, told MedPage Today.

Sleep issues can appear years before the classic motor symptoms of Parkinsons, but it has only been relatively recently that sleep has become part of the diagnostic workup of the disorder, he added.

Insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep fragmentation, circadian rhythm disorders, restless leg syndrome, and rapid eye movement behavior disorder are all common in patients with Parkinsons disease.

Whats The Relationship Between Parkinsons And Sleep

Parkinsons Sleep Problems: Diagnosis And Treatment

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Referral To A Specialist

If your GP suspects Parkinson’s disease, you’ll be referred to a specialist.

This will usually be:

  • a neurologist, a specialist in conditions affecting the brain and nervous system
  • a geriatrician, a specialist in problems affecting elderly people

The specialist will most likely ask you to perform a number of physical exercises so they can assess whether you have any problems with movement.

A diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease is likely if you have at least 2 of the 3 following symptoms:

  • shaking or tremor in a part of your body that usually only occurs at rest
  • slowness of movement
  • muscle stiffness

If your symptoms improve after taking a medication called levodopa, it’s more likely you have Parkinson’s disease.

Special brain scans, such as a;single photon emission computed tomography scan, may also be carried out in some cases;to try to;rule out;other causes of;your symptoms.

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What Raises Someone’s Risk For Parkinson’s

It’s a complex picture, but you may be more likely to get Parkinson’s based on:

Age. Since it mostly affects people 60 and older, your risk goes up as the years go by.

Family history. If your parent, brother, or sister has it, you’re a little more likely to get it.

Job. Some types of work, like farming or factory jobs, can cause you to have contact with chemicals linked to Parkinson’s.

Race. It shows up more often in white people than other groups.

Serious head injury. If you hit your head hard enough to lose consciousness or forget things as a result of it, you may be more likely to get Parkinson’s later in life.

Gender. Men get it more than women. Doctors aren’t sure why.

Where you live. People in rural areas seem to get it more often, which may be tied to chemicals used in farming.

Parkinsons Patients: Be Warned Of Sleep Attacks

Diseases Related to Parkinsons Disease

The sleepiness may begin only after many months of apparently safe and effective treatment, according to a study in the August issue of Movement Disorders. The sleep attacks can come on so fast that patients have been known to fall asleep while eating, standing, speaking, or brushing the dog.

Robert Hauser, MD, tells WebMD that Parkinsons patients should be on the alert, as it were, for this problem and should take it seriously if it occurs.

Patients who begin to have serious daytime sleepiness should see their doctor immediately and should not drive until the problem is resolved, says Hauser, the author of the study and director of the Parkinsons Disease and Movement Disorders Center at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Problems with anti-Parkinsons drugs were first reported last year and involved two relatively new drugs Miraplex and Requip . At that time, Stanley Fahn, MD, scientific director of the Parkinsons Disease Foundation in New York City, issued an advisory saying, Because it is impossible to ascertain in advance which patients will experience this side effect, it is preferable that users of avoid driving altogether.

Seven of 14 patients with moderate or severe sleepiness fell asleep while driving, and two had auto accidents as a consequence.

A Day In The Life Of A Parkinsons Disease Sufferer

A Typical Morning

What is Parkinsons disease?

Treatment for Parkinsons

Getting Help

Evaluation Of Sleep Hygiene Program: Sleep Diary

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Theories About What Causes Parkinsons

The cause of Parkinsons disease is still unknown, although there is some evidence for the role of genetics, environmental factors, or a combination of both. It is also possible that there may be more than one cause of the disease. Scientists generally believe that both genetics and environment interact to cause Parkinsons disease in most people who have it.

Currently, there is an enormous amount of research directed at producing more answers about what causes Parkinsons disease and how it might be prevented or cured. When physicians diagnose Parkinsons, they often describe it as idiopathic . This simply means that the cause of the;disease is not known.

How Is Parkinson Disease Treated

Parkinson disease can’t be cured. But there are different therapies that can help control symptoms. Many of the medicines used to treat Parkinson disease help to offset the loss of the chemical dopamine in the brain. Most of these medicines help manage symptoms quite successfully.

A procedure called deep brain stimulation may also be used to treat Parkinson disease. It sends electrical impulses into the brain to help control tremors and twitching movements. Some people may need surgery to manage Parkinson disease symptoms. Surgery may involve destroying small areas of brain tissue responsible for the symptoms. However, these surgeries are rarely done since deep brain stimulation is now available.

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Exercise And Healthy Eating

Regular exercise is particularly important in helping relieve muscle stiffness, improving your mood, and relieving stress.

There are many activities you can do to help keep yourself fit, ranging from more active sports like tennis and cycling, to less strenuous activities such as walking, gardening and yoga.

You should also try to eat a balanced diet containing all the food groups to give your body the nutrition it needs to stay healthy.

Fatigue In Parkinsons Disease

Why You Need Balls to Beat Parkinson’s Disease

Fatigue is a common but under-recognized problem for people with Parkinsons disease . Fatigue can be defined as an unpleasant sensation of lacking energy, making the performance of routine activities, physical or mental, a strain. People with PD may experience physical fatigue, mental fatigue, or both. Fatigue in PD is not the same as the feeling you might get at the end of a hard days work. It is not necessarily something that goes away with rest. When people with PD are asked about fatigue, they use phrases such as, I feel run down, I am out of energy, I am unable to do anything, I cant get motivated.

Fatigue in Parkinsons;Brochure

No time to finish the article? Download the brochure as a PDF to take this information with you, or share with someone you know.

Fatigue is common in PD

Fatigue and Depression

There is a large overlap between fatigue and other problems in PD, especially depression and sleep disorders. People with fatigue are more likely to be depressed and people who are depressed are more likely to be fatigued, but there is nonetheless a large group of PD patients who are fatigued but not depressed. Depression in PD typically responds to antidepressant treatment, and depression-related fatigue may improve with such treatment.

Introducing an easier way to track your symptoms and manage your care.

Dont want to download the app? Use the non-mobile version here.

Fatigue and Sleep disorders

Causes of Fatigue

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How Is Parkinson Disease Diagnosed

Parkinson disease can be hard to diagnose. No single test can identify it. Parkinson can be easily mistaken for another health condition. A healthcare provider will usually take a medical history, including a family history to find out if anyone else in your family has Parkinson’s disease. He or she will also do a neurological exam. Sometimes, an MRI or CT scan, or some other imaging scan of the brain can identify other problems or rule out other diseases.

What Are The Ways To Prevent Parkinsons Disease In A Patient

According to the research done so far, doctors and scientists believe that Parkinsons disease is triggered through a combination of genetic factors and exposure to factors like trauma and certain kinds of toxins and illness. Thus, the Parkinsons disease cannot be prevented as of now since proper etiology is yet to be discovered.

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Symptoms Of Parkinson’s Disease

The symptoms and rate of progression of Parkinsons are different among individuals. Effects of normal aging are sometimes confused for Parkinsons. It is difficult to accurately diagnose this disease because there is not a test that can accurately do it.

There are physical and non-physical symptoms that could indicate someone has Parkinsons disease:

Physical symptoms

Early stage symptoms

Parkinson’s disease occurs gradually. At first, the symptoms might not even be noticeable. Early symptoms can include feeling mild tremors or having difficulty getting out of bed or a chair. The person might start to notice that they are speaking softer than usual, or that their handwriting looks different.

Usually, it is friends or family members who are the first to notice changes in someone with early Parkinson’s. For example, they may notice that the person’s face lacks expression and animation, or that the person does not move an arm or leg normally.

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