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How Many People In Us Have Parkinsons

How Many Canadians Live With Parkinsonism And How Many Are Newly Diagnosed Each Year

What are the different stages of Parkinson’s disease?

Based on the latest estimates available , in 20132014, approximately 84,000 Canadians aged 40 years and older were living with diagnosed parkinsonism and 10,000 Canadians were newly diagnosed with this condition . The age-standardized prevalence was 1.5Footnote i;times higher among males than among females , and similarly the age-standardized incidence was 1.7Footnote i;times higher among males than females . The epidemiological burden of parkinsonism increases with age. In 20132014, when comparing estimates among Canadians aged 85 years and older vs. those aged 40-44 years, the prevalence of the condition was 169Footnote i;times higher in the older age group , while the incidence was 48Footnote i;times higher in the older age group .

Figure 1: Prevalence of diagnosed parkinsonism, including Parkinsons disease, by sex and age group, Canada, 20132014

Figure 1: Prevalence of diagnosed parkinsonism, including Parkinsons disease, by sex and age group, Canada, 20132014

Age group
44.7 55.1

Note: The 95% confidence interval shows an estimated range of values which is likely to include the true value 19 times out of 20. Data source: Public Health Agency of Canada, using Canadian Chronic Disease Surveillance System data files contributed by provinces and territories, July 2017.

Maurice White: A Performer With Parkinson’s

One of the founding members of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White noted the first symptoms of Parkinson’s disease in the 1980s while the band’s popularity was going strong. Although he was diagnosed in 1992 at age 50, he kept quiet about his disease for eight years. In a 2000 interview with Rolling Stone, he discussed his diagnosis, saying, “I traveled with the band for five years with Parkinson’s. I was treating it with medication then, and I still have it under control. It’s not taking anything away from me.”

White died in 2016;at age 74.

New Study Shows 12 Million People In The United States Estimated To Be Living With Parkinsons Disease By 2030

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Parkinsons Foundation Reveals Most Comprehensive Estimate ofParkinsons Prevalence in North America since the 1970s

NEW YORK & MIAMI, July 10, 2018 A Parkinsons Foundation study recently published in the scientific journal, npj Parkinsons Disease, reveals findings from the most comprehensive estimate of Parkinsons disease in the United States and Canada to date. The Foundations Parkinsons Prevalence Project estimates that 930,000 people in the United States will be living with the disease by 2020, further increasing to 1.2 million people by 2030.

“Our knowledge of Parkinsons has evolved significantly and so should our understanding of the population that has this disease, said James Beck, PhD, Parkinsons Foundation Chief Scientific Officer and contributing author on the study. These findings will help attract the attention of federal and state government as well as the pharmaceutical industry to the growing need and urgency in addressing Parkinsons disease.

Connie Marras, MD, PhD, lead author on the study and movement disorder neurologist at the Movement Disorders Centre at Toronto Western Hospital, a Parkinsons Foundation Center of Excellence and the Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinsons research said, Like Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons affects primarily older individuals and poses a significant health care burden, as well as a real challenge on how to care for the aging population over the coming decades.

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Can We Turn The Tide

The study authors believe that the key to transforming this seemingly inevitable rise in Parkinsons disease is activism.

Conditions such as HIV and breast cancer have benefited widely from this approach. For example, many focus on raising awareness, amassing funds, improving treatments, and changing policy.

Stopping the production and use of certain chemicals that may increase the risk of Parkinsons is essential. As the authors write:

We have the means to prevent potentially millions from ever experiencing the debilitating effects of Parkinson disease.

Also crucial, as ever, is financial backing. More research is needed to understand why the condition appears and how it progresses, and this type of scientific investigation is never cheap.

In particular, scientists need to develop better medications. Currently, the most effective therapy is levodopa, which is 50 years old and not without its issues, including both psychological and physical side effects.

While this recent analysis is worrying, the authors leave the reader with some positivity, concluding that he Parkinson pandemic is preventable, not inevitable.

Ozzy Osbourne: Coming To Terms With His Diagnosis

The Rise of Parkinson

Former Black Sabbath front man Ozzy Osbourne revealed the news of his Parkinsons disease diagnosis in an emotional interview with Robin Roberts on Good Morning America. Accompanied by his wife, Sharon, Osbourne confirmed that hed been diagnosed with Parkinsons in February 2019 following a series of health issues though his case is mild and, as Sharon emphasized, its not a death sentence by any stretch of the imagination.

Im no good with secrets, the rock star confessed. I cannot walk around with it anymore cause its like Im running out of excuses.

The diagnosis coincided with a bad fall and subsequent surgery on his neck, as Osbourne began to experience numbness and chills in one arm and both legs. I dont know if thats the Parkinsons or what, he said. Thats the problem … its a weird feeling. Hes now taking Parkinsons medication along with nerve pills and has planned a trip to see a specialist in Switzerland in April 2020.

I feel better now Ive owned up to the fact that I have a case of Parkinsons, Osbourne said. And I hope hang around, because I need them.

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Mortality From Parkinsons Disease

With treatment, the life expectancy of people with PD is similar to that of the general population. However, dementia seems to largely impact life expectancy among people with PD, and about 50 percent to 80 percent of people with PD develop dementia in their lifetime. Risk factors for mortality include later age of onset, male sex, severity of motor impairment, presence of psychotic symptoms, and dementia. Early detection of disease, prevention of motor symptom progression, and treatment of dementia can increase life expectancy.8,9

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Who Gets Parkinson’s Disease

About 1 million people in the United States have Parkinson’s disease, and both men and women can get it. Symptoms usually appear when someone is older than 50 and it becomes more common as people get older.

Many people wonder if you’re more likely to get Parkinson’s disease if you have a relative who has it. Although the role that heredity plays isn’t completely understood, we do know that if a close relative like a parent, brother, or sister has Parkinson’s, there is a greater chance of developing the disease. But Parkinson’s disease is not contagious. You can’t get it by simply being around someone who has it.

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How Is Parkinsons Diagnosed

Doctors use your medical history and physical examination to diagnose Parkinson’s disease . No blood test, brain scan or other test can be used to make a definitive diagnosis of PD.

Researchers believe that in most people, Parkinson’s is caused by a;combination of;environmental and genetic;factors. Certain environmental exposures, such as pesticides and head injury, are associated with an increased risk of PD. Still, most people have no clear exposure that doctors can point to as a straightforward cause. The same goes for genetics.;Certain genetic mutations are linked to an increased risk of PD. But in the vast majority of people, Parkinsons is not directly related to a single genetic mutation. Learning more about the genetics of Parkinsons is one of our best chances to understand more about the disease and discover how to slow or stop its progression.

Aging is the greatest risk factor;for Parkinsons, and the average age at diagnosis is 60.;Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

Men are diagnosed with Parkinsons at a higher rate than women and whites more than other races. Researchers are studying these disparities to understand more about the disease and health care access and to improve inclusivity across care and research.;

Aging is the greatest risk factor;for Parkinsons, and the average age at diagnosis is 60.;Still, some people get PD at 40 or younger.

The Michael J. Fox Foundation has made finding a test for Parkinsons disease one of our top priorities.

Projected Estimates Of Parkinsons Disease With Aging Population

Faces of Parkinson’s

As the life expectancy has increased worldwide, it is expected that the burden of chronic diseases, like PD, will continue to grow. It is estimated that the number of people with PD in 2005 totaled between 4.1 million and 4.6 million and that number will more than double by 2030 to between 8.7 million and 9.3 million.7

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Linda Ronstadt: Parkinson’s Took Her Voice But Not Her Spirit

Known for her rich soprano vocals as the lead singer of the 1960s band the Stone Poneys, Linda Ronstadt opened up about her Parkinson’s disease diagnosis to AARP The Magazine in 2013. After two very bad tick bites in the 1980s, Ronstadt says her health never fully recovered but she didn’t visit a neurologist until she was no longer able to sing.

“I didn’t know why I couldn’t sing all I knew was that it was muscular or mechanical. Then when I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s, I was finally given the reason. I now understand that no one can sing with Parkinson’s disease. No matter how hard you try. And in my case, I can’t sing a note,” she told AARP.

Brian Grant: Staying Positive With Parkinson’s

Brian Grant spent 12 seasons as a National Basketball Association player, playing for the Sacramento Kings, the Portland Trail Blazers, the Miami Heat, the Los Angeles Lakers, and the Phoenix Suns. As an NBA player, he was known for his positive team commitment as well as his work with disadvantaged children. According to an interview with ESPN, he was diagnosed with early-onset Parkinson’s disease in January 2009, following his retirement from professional basketball. He went on to found the Brian Grant Foundation, which is dedicated to raising awareness and inspiring those living with Parkinson’s disease to include exercise as medicine.

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Parkinson’s ‘wasn’t Anything We Had Considered’

Getting an earlier diagnosis would have helped Melbourne woman Sheenagh Bottrell.

One of the first signs something was amiss was when her friend noticed she was limping while they were out on their regular walks.

“I had already had problems with my shoulder, but I really didn’t worry about it very much,” Ms Bottrell said.

“But my friend was constantly at me to go and see the doctor.”

After seeing a neurologist, Ms Bottrell, 47, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2011.

“It was a shock. It wasn’t anything we had considered,” she said.

Ms Bottrell said if she had been diagnosed earlier, she might have done things differently.

“I am fortunate that I have mild symptoms, but for people who have tremors, earlier detection and getting onto good treatment early would be much better,” she said.

Doctors advised Ms Bottrell not to let the illness take over her life and her thinking.

“I have tried to get on with life and not let it get in the way,” she said.

The Florey Institute has applied to the Federal Government’s Medical Research Future Fund for a grant to move to the next phase of testing the smell screening tool.

What Causes Parkinsons Disease

New Numbers in on Parkinson

Parkinsons disease develops when there is a loss of nerve cells in the brain which produce a chemical called dopamine. ;Dopamine is a chemical messenger that transmits impulses between nerve cells in the brain to control body movements. ;Without enough dopamine, nerves in the brain which control muscle action do not work properly. ;When the loss of nerve cells reaches 80%, Parkinsons disease symptoms begin to appear. ;The disease progresses over time as dopamine levels in the brain gradually fall.

The reason for the nerve damage is currently unknown, although two areas currently being researched as possible causes are genetics and environmental factors.

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Ben Petrick: The Major League With Parkinson’s

Ben Petrick dreamed of a stellar baseball career as a catcher with the Colorado Rockies. He played in 240 Major League games, the majority of which came after Parkinson’s disease struck him at age 22 in 2000. He retired from baseball in 2004.

He’s since authored Forty Thousand to One, a book whose title in part references the 40,000 Americans diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease every year. The book also recounts his experiences in Major League Baseball while coping with Parkinson’s disease. According to an ESPN interview, Petrick’s father was also diagnosed with the condition but maintains a positive attitude, saying that although he has Parkinson’s, Parkinson’s doesn’t have him.

How Many People Does Parkinsons Disease Affect

Parkinsons disease affects 1 in every 500 people in Canada.; Over 100,000 Canadians are living with Parkinsons today and approximately 6,600 new cases of PD are diagnosed each year in Canada .; Most are diagnosed over the age of 60; however, at least 10% of the Parkinsons population develops symptoms before the age of 50.; Approximately four million people worldwide are living with the condition.

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Parkinson’s Prevalence Facts And Stats

Parkinson’s is the fastest growing neurological condition in the world, and currently there is no cure.;

1 in 37 people alive today in the UK will be diagnosed with Parkinson’s in their lifetime.

Our estimates show that around 145,000 people live with a Parkinson’s diagnosis in the UK in 2020.

Broken down within the UK, for 2020, that’s:

  • England:;121,000
  • Wales:;7,600
  • Northern Ireland:;3,900;

With population growth and ageing, this is likely to increase by a fifth, to around 172,000 people in the UK, by 2030.

Every hour, 2 more people are diagnosed. That’s the same as 18,000 people every year.;

Muhammad Ali: A Fighter For Parkinson’s Awareness

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The beloved boxer Muhammad Ali coped with shaking hands and mobility challenges long before he retired from the sport in 1981. In 1984, doctors diagnosed Ali with Parkinson’s disease. Ali, the philanthropist Jimmy Walker, and Abraham Lieberman, MD, established the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center for movement disorders, a Parkinson’s Foundation Center of Excellence at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix. It serves as a resource center for Parkinson’s and other movement disorders, including Huntington’s disease and essential tremor, for both patients and their families.

Ali was long associated with the annual gala fundraising event for Barrow Neurological Institute, Celebrity Fight Night, where he was the featured guest. Awareness-building runs in the family: His daughter Rasheda Ali wrote a book for children about Parkinson’s disease, I’ll Hold Your Hand so You Won’t Fall: A Child’s Guide to Parkinson’s Disease.

Muhammad Ali died in June 2016 at age 74.

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Prevalence Of Parkinsons State

Western and Southern states appear to have lower rates of Parkinsons disease, while Northeastern and many Midwestern states have higher rates . Mississippi and Montana have the lowest rates of Parkinsons, at 5.1 per 10,000. Vermont has the highest rate of Parkinsons at 9.9 per 10,000.

Exhibit 2: Prevalence of Parkinsons Disease, by geography

What Is It And How Does It Affect Those Whove Been Diagnosed

Parkinsons disease is a type of movement disorder that can affect the ability to perform common, daily activities. It is a chronic and progressive disease, meaning that the symptoms become worse over time. It is characterized by its most common of motor symptomstremors , stiffness or rigidity of the muscles, and slowness of movement but also manifests in non-motor symptoms including sleep problems, constipation, anxiety, depression, and fatigue, among others.

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The Impact Of Parkinsons Disease On Overall Health

Based on the Blue Cross Blue Shield Health Index, the overall health of those affected by Parkinsons is significantly lower than the general population. In 2017, the average BCBS Health Index for someone aged 30-64 with Parkinsons was 57, compared to 88 for the entire commercially insured population in this age range. This translates to an average of 10.7 years of healthy life lost for those with the condition compared to 3.4 years for the 30-64 population as a whole.4

Caring for someone with Parkinsons Disease

The majority of Parkinsons patients are cared for by informal caregivers, such as a family member. The physical, mental and emotional work this requires can be significant. The Impact of Caregiving on Mental and Physical Health found that caregivers have 26% poorer health compared to a benchmark population, as measured by the BCBS Health Index. In addition, a national survey conducted by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association found that 1 in 4 unpaid caregivers are feeling more stress trying to balance work and family due to COVID-19.5

Surgery For People With Parkinsons Disease

The Rise of Parkinson

Deep brain stimulation surgery is an option to treat Parkinsons disease symptoms, but it is not suitable for everyone. There are strict criteria and guidelines on who can be a candidate for surgery, and this is something that only your doctor and you can decide. Surgery may be considered early or late in the progression of Parkinsons.;When performing deep-brain stimulation surgery, the surgeon places an electrode in the part of the brain most effected by Parkinsons disease. Electrical impulses are introduced to the brain, which has the effect of normalising the brains electrical activity reducing the symptoms of Parkinsons disease. The electrical impulse is introduced using a pacemaker-like device called a stimulator.;Thalamotomy and pallidotomy are operations where the surgeon makes an incision on part of the brain. These surgeries aim to alleviate some forms of tremor or unusual movement, but they are rarely performed now.

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